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Whitey Ford Sings the Blues
     

Whitey Ford Sings the Blues

by Everlast
 

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Saying that Everlast showed a great deal of artistic growth between his first and second solo albums would be a understatement. While 1989/1990's Forever Everlasting was a decent, if uneven, debut, Everlast's second solo album, Whitey Ford Sings the Blues is an amazingly eclectic gem that finds him really pushing himself

Overview

Saying that Everlast showed a great deal of artistic growth between his first and second solo albums would be a understatement. While 1989/1990's Forever Everlasting was a decent, if uneven, debut, Everlast's second solo album, Whitey Ford Sings the Blues is an amazingly eclectic gem that finds him really pushing himself creatively. Between those two albums, Everlast joined and left House of Pain, which evolved into one of the most distinctive rap groups of the 1990s. While Pain's albums thrived on wildness for its own sake, Whitey Ford has a much more introspective and serious tone. Everlast, who was born with a heart defect, was in the process of recording the album when he needed life-saving open-heart surgery; in fact, he was lucky that he was around to see Whitey Ford completed and released. Though not without its share of hardcore b-boy rap, Whitey Ford also finds Everlast playing acoustic guitar, doing some singing, and exploring folk-rock, Memphis soul, and heavy metal. As a singer, Everlast has a relaxed style that sounds a bit like Gil Scott-Heron. "Today (Watch Me Shine)," "Ends," and "What It's Like" venture into Neil Young/Bob Dylan territory, while "Hot to Death" is blistering metal with industrial touches. And the plot thickens -- on "The Letter," he raps over a jazz-influenced piano. Given how rap's hardcore tends to frown on rappers crossing over to rock, it took guts for Everlast to be so diverse. But it's a good thing that he did, for his risk-taking pays off handsomely on this outstanding release. [Whitey Ford Sings the Blues was also released in a clean version, with all vulgarities removed.]

Product Details

Release Date:
05/07/1999
Label:
Tommy Boy
UPC:
0016998129029
catalogNumber:
1290

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Everlast   Primary Artist,Guitar,scratching,Keyboards
Bronx Style Bob   Background Vocals,Track Performer
Keith Ciancia   Keyboards,Track Performer
Kia Jeffries   Vocals,Track Performer
Norwood Fisher   Bass,Track Performer
Human Beat Box   Track Performer
Dante Ross   Bass,Piano,scratching,Strings,Track Performer
Jacqueline Suzuki   Violin,Track Performer
John Wang   Viola,Track Performer
Elizabeth Wright   Cello,Track Performer
Todd M. Simon   Track Performer
Ben Boccardo   Bass
Alen C. Agadhzhanyan   Violin
Stephen Cullo   Keyboards
Geoffrey Gallegos   Tenor (Vocal)
Giovanni Loria   Bass
Nightrain Merlot   Bass
Dan Osterman   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Everlast   Producer,Executive Producer
E-Swift   Producer
John Gamble   Producer,Engineer
Jason Rand   Art Direction
Dante Ross   Producer,Executive Producer
Carl Stubner   Executive Producer
Geoffrey Gallegos   Horn Arrangements
Giovanni Loria   Horn Arrangements

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