Who Are You [Bonus Tracks]

( 5 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richie Unterberger
On the Who's final album with Keith Moon, their trademark honest power started to get diluted by fatigue and a sense that the group's collective vision was beginning to fade. As instrumentalists, their skills were intact. More problematic was the erratic quality of the material, which seemed torn between blustery attempts at contemporary relevance ("Sister Disco," "New Song," "Music Must Change") and bittersweet insecurity ("Love Is Coming Down"). Most problematic of all were the arrangements, heavy on the symphonic synthesizers and strings, which make the record sound cluttered and overanxious. Roger Daltrey's operatic tough-guy braggadocio in particular was ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richie Unterberger
On the Who's final album with Keith Moon, their trademark honest power started to get diluted by fatigue and a sense that the group's collective vision was beginning to fade. As instrumentalists, their skills were intact. More problematic was the erratic quality of the material, which seemed torn between blustery attempts at contemporary relevance ("Sister Disco," "New Song," "Music Must Change") and bittersweet insecurity ("Love Is Coming Down"). Most problematic of all were the arrangements, heavy on the symphonic synthesizers and strings, which make the record sound cluttered and overanxious. Roger Daltrey's operatic tough-guy braggadocio in particular was beginning to sound annoying on several cuts. Yet Pete Townshend's better tunes -- "Music Must Change," "Love Is Coming Down," and the anthemic title track -- continued to explore the contradictions of aging rockers in interesting, effective ways. Whether due to Moon's death or not, it was the last reasonably interesting Who record. The 1996 CD reissue adds five previously unreleased alternate takes and demos.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/19/1996
  • Label: Mca
  • UPC: 008811149222
  • Catalog Number: 11492
  • Sales rank: 26,820

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 New Song (4:13)
  2. 2 Had Enough (4:30)
  3. 3 905 (4:02)
  4. 4 Sister Disco (4:22)
  5. 5 Music Must Change (4:38)
  6. 6 Trick of the Light (4:47)
  7. 7 Guitar and Pen (5:58)
  8. 8 Love Is Coming Down (4:06)
  9. 9 Who Are You (6:21)
  10. 10 No Road Romance (5:05)
  11. 11 Empty Glass (6:23)
  12. 12 Guitar and Pen (6:02)
  13. 13 Love Is Coming Down (4:05)
  14. 14 Who Are You (6:22)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Who Primary Artist
Roger Daltrey Harmonica, Vocals
Pete Townshend Synthesizer, Guitar, Piano, Keyboards, Vocals
Rod Argent Synthesizer, Piano
Andy Fairweather Low Background Vocals
Keith Moon Percussion, Drums, Vocals
John Entwistle Synthesizer, Bass, Bass Guitar, Horn, Keyboards, Vocals
Ted Astley Strings
Technical Credits
Pete Townshend Composer
Jon Astley Producer, Reissue Producer, Remixing, Reissue
Chris Charlesworth Executive Producer
Bill Curbishley Executive Producer
John Entwistle Composer
Glyn Johns Producer
Bob Ludwig Remastering
Andy MacPherson Reissue Producer, Remixing, Reissue
Ted Astley String Arrangements
Bill Smith Cover Design
Martyn Goddard Back Cover
Matt Resnicoff Liner Notes
Robert Rosenberg Executive Producer
Richard Evans Art Direction, Reissue Design
Terry O'Neill Cover Photo
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Keith's last

    The album is all over the place but it does have the great title track and it is the last album Moon made with the group so for those reasons it is an essential Who album. Not everything here is great, but enough of the songs are good enough to make this one worth owning.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Good but Townshend's Heart was out of it

    It has great tracks such as "sister disco" and "who are you" and "new song" and the "music must change". However, those songs were meant for the aborted lifehouse projects which would be compiled later in Pete Townshend's Lifehouse Chronicles which you can buy on his website. Lifehouse was the supposed follow-up to Tommy and has 8 of the 9 songs from Who's next. Of course the songs listed above are the better tracks but during this time Pete kept drinking and gradually leaving the Who so to speak. He just didn't care anymore. If you read the liner notes you'll see why "who are you" is named that way.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Superb Album Before Keith Fought His Way To Heaven

    John Entwistle, the band's bassist, wrote a lot of songs (many of 'em sung by Roger Daltrey) like "Had Enough" and "905." He began experimenting with the synthesizer for the first time as well. I am proud that Keith Moon made sure the Who's audience would give their last hurrahs to this album before his death. "Trick of the Light" (also written by Entwistle) is a wonderful track, because Pete Townshend explained that Entwistle's 8-string bass solo "sounded like a musical Mack truck." "Trick" could have paved references to songs such as Pink's "18 Wheeler" (Pete's quote on John's bass solo--18-wheeler trucks have a big sound) and Supertramp's "Rudy" (although recorded and released four years prior to this album; same quote as above--but, as the bridge begins, the guitar solo, played by Roger Hodgson, sounds like a musical train)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews