Who Belongs Here?: Teacher's Guide

Who Belongs Here?: Teacher's Guide

by Margy Burns Knight, Margy Burns Knight
     
 
Who Belongs Here? tells the story of Nary, a young boy fleeing war-torn Cambodia for the safety of the United States. To some of his new classmates, however, he is a "chink" who should go back where he belongs. But what if everyone whose family came from another place was forced to return to his or her homeland? Who would be left? This story teaches compassion for

Overview

Who Belongs Here? tells the story of Nary, a young boy fleeing war-torn Cambodia for the safety of the United States. To some of his new classmates, however, he is a "chink" who should go back where he belongs. But what if everyone whose family came from another place was forced to return to his or her homeland? Who would be left? This story teaches compassion for recent immigrants while sharing the history of immigration in America and some of the important contributions made by past immigrants. It is used in schools everywhere for units on immigration and tolerance.

The Who Belongs Here? Teacher's Guide, written by Margy Burns Knight and Thomas V. Chan, offers dozens of imaginative ideas for exploring immigration, refugees, and other topics related to diversity.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Following their well-received Talking Walls , Knight and O'Brien again team up for an affectionate if didactic exploration of connections among people world-wide. This time the message is filtered through the experience of Nary, a Cambodian refugee who immigrates to the U.S. with his grandmother after the death of both parents. Hostility toward immigrants and the impetus to work for change are explored. The central question, ``What if everyone . . . whose ancestors came from another country was forced to return to his or her homeland? . . . Who would be left?'' signals the book's design as a vehicle for discussion. The text itself pairs Nary's story with italicized information on immigration to the U.S. This strategy is only intermittently effective; younger readers may not be capable of making the conceptual jumps both Knight and O'Brien require, while older readers may chafe at the picture-book format. These limitations notwithstanding, the volume provides strong starting points for ongoing explorations of multicultural themes. Ages 7-13. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Drawing on her experience as an ESL teacher, Knight introduces the fictional character Nary, a 10-year-old boy from Cambodia. Accompanying his story of leaving his homeland and settling in this country is a parallel text, set in italics, that expands some of the ideas presented. Sometimes it provides background information on U.S. immigration or history; at other times it serves to stimulate discussion, particularly on such topics as intolerance and prejudice. Notes in the back give additional material on individuals (Pol Pot, Dith Pran, Dolores Huerta) and concepts introduced earlier. Three-quarters of each double-page spread is covered with brightly colored, impressionistic pastel illustrations. Unfortunately, the texts do not blend well. Nary's story is choppy; the italicized portions are often superficial and not always relevant. For information strictly on Cambodian immigrants, consult Nancy Graff's Where the River Runs (Little, 1993).-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780884481119
Publisher:
Tilbury House Publishers
Publication date:
06/28/2003
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.49(w) x 11.01(h) x 0.14(d)
Age Range:
8 - 13 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >