Who Is Afraid of the State?: Canada in a World of Multiple Centres of Power

Overview

Is the government becoming less powerful? Is it in retreat vis-a-vis a proliferation of non-governmental agencies, multinational corporations, and international organizations? The essays in this collection argue that - contrary to some private-sector populists - the state is in the best position to lead in making policy in a rapidly changing world and should retain and refine this responsibility. Examining the interaction of government, international organizations, civil society, and the private sector, the ...

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Overview

Is the government becoming less powerful? Is it in retreat vis-a-vis a proliferation of non-governmental agencies, multinational corporations, and international organizations? The essays in this collection argue that - contrary to some private-sector populists - the state is in the best position to lead in making policy in a rapidly changing world and should retain and refine this responsibility. Examining the interaction of government, international organizations, civil society, and the private sector, the contributors show that government, far from being stagnant, is in a constant state of transformation and revitalization. It may work to prepare citizens for changes that often seem inevitable and sometimes it challenges, even resists, the directions or modes of such change. It remains an important - perhaps the most crucial - actor in the governance process.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802083883
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2001
  • Series: Trends Project Series
  • Pages: 370
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Gordon S. Smith is executive director of the Centre for Global Studies, University of Victoria, and chairs the board of the International Development Research Centre.

Daniel Wolfish is currently a Strategic Priorities Analyst for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

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Table of Contents

Figures and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Acronyms
1 Introduction: Conceptualizing Multiple Centres of Power 3
2 Menage a trois: The State between Civil Society and the International System 29
3 Policy Making in a Multicentric World: The Impact of Globalization, Privatization, and Decentralization on Democratic Governance 89
4 Governance of Politics without a Centre 133
5 The Multi-centred State: Canadian Government under Globalizing Pressures 163
6 The Emergence of International Parliamentary Institutions: New Networks of Influence in World Society 201
7 International Convention Secretariats and Canada's Role in Future Environmental Governance 230
8 Rendering unto Caesar: How Legal Pluralism and Regime Theory Help in Understanding Multiple Centres of Power 259
9 Conclusion: Implications for Governance and Policy 311
References 327
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