Who Is Going to School Today?

Who Is Going to School Today?

by Karl Ruhmann, K Ruhmann, M Monnier, Miriam Monnier
     
 

One day Sam decides he does not want to go to school. He comes up with the idea of sending his stuffed monkey in his place. As he dresses the monkey in his own school clothes, tells him how to behave, and describes kindergarten, Sam realizes how bored he'll be at home. Sam decides that they will both go to school today. Whether it's first-day jitters or

Overview

One day Sam decides he does not want to go to school. He comes up with the idea of sending his stuffed monkey in his place. As he dresses the monkey in his own school clothes, tells him how to behave, and describes kindergarten, Sam realizes how bored he'll be at home. Sam decides that they will both go to school today. Whether it's first-day jitters or middle-of-term blahs, here's the perfect solution for children who don't want to go to school.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Young Sam's answer to the title question is an emphatic "Not me" and he plots to send his stuffed monkey, Timbo, in his place. It won't be an easy ruse to pull off: "Oh, but your ears are much too big. And so are your feet. Mother will guess right away," the boy says. But the more pointers Sam gives Timbo on fitting in at school (how to choose from all the terrific activities, what to do at circle time, the pleasures of eating a snack, etc.) and the more Sam realizes just how humdrum life as a left-behind toy can be, the better school sounds. Ruhmann captures the eagerness and self-satisfied excitement of Sam's scheming, as well as the humor of his necessarily one-sided conversations with Timbo: "`What do you eat for your snack?' Sam asked his friend. `What? Nothing?' Sam sighed." But the somber palette of Monnier's full-bleed acrylic spreads, while elegantly composed and populated with happy children, give off a strangely muted energy. Her scenes between boy and toy are more convincing than the allegedly attractive school setting. Ages 3-6. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
As Sam snuggles back under his blankets, he thinks about how nice it would be to stay at home and let his stuffed monkey Timbo go to school for him. He decides to give Timbo some pointers about getting ready and about what to expect at school. He then asks Timbo some questions about what he does at home all day. He discovers that Timbo's day is pretty boring. If Sam stays home alone he will have no breakfast, no friends, no games, no snack, and no ice cream. He decides he will go to school and take Timbo along. Sam and Timbo appear cozy and happy in the bright, bold illustrations. Sam's descriptions of his day at school portray the action and joy of preschoolers at play. First published in Switzerland, this story has universal appeal for young children. 2002, North-South Books,
— Phyllis Kennemer
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-One morning, Sam does not want to go to school, and grooms his stuffed monkey Timbo to be his replacement. However, as he prepares his toy for his day by describing circle time, playing outside, and eating snacks, he reconsiders. Thinking about how dull a day home alone would be, he decides to go to school after all, taking Timbo along to share in the fun. Monnier's dreamy full-page illustrations convey both the comforting environment and exciting activities of the child's day. Paired with R hmann's engaging descriptions, they make school enticing to children. The large, lively pictures make this an ideal choice for storytime, especially on days when class enthusiasm is waning.-Shara Alpern, The Free Library of Philadelphia Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A reluctant preschooler decides to play hooky from school. Young Sam awakens one morning with the notion to spend the day at home; visions of lounging in bed and idly playing with toys convince him to send his stuffed monkey, Timbo, in his place. Sam's ingenious stratagems will delight persnickety preschoolers, as he executes a well-thought-out disguise for his impersonator-right down to a hat and socks to cover big monkey ears and feet. In preparation for the switch, Sam describes a typical school day for the apprehensive toy. To his amazement, Sam discovers a morning full of school is much more exciting than staying home masquerading as a stuffed animal. Rühmann's tale achieves the right tone for youngsters firmly rooted in Sam's "no school" camp. Sam's dawning realization that school is pretty terrific is handled with a smooth subtlety, skillfully drawing readers along to the same conclusion. Monnier's (The Great Golden Thing, p. 100, etc.) full-page illustrations are liberally coated in color. Shifting tones artfully express the lively allure of school; the at-home pictures are awash in subdued hues while the schoolhouse is a medley of vivid pigments. Just the thing to entice aspiring truants back to the classroom. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735816237
Publisher:
North-South Books, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2002
Edition description:
Library Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.68(w) x 11.52(h) x 0.31(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Karl Ruhmann was born in the former Yugoslavia and now lives in Switzerland. His previous books for North-South include Who Will Go to School Today? Filbert Flies, and But I Want To!

Monnier was born in Hamburg, Germany, where she still lives. She studied graphic design and worked as a freelance designer for a woman's magazine.

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