Who is Jesus?: Answers to Your Questions about the Historical Jesus

Overview

This fascinating book makes the results of a lifetime of scholarship readily available to nonspecialists who want to meet the historical Jesus. Eminent biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan collaborates with pastor Richard G. Watts to rediscover the life, the work, and the message of the Man from Galilee.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $5.81   
  • Used (21) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

This fascinating book makes the results of a lifetime of scholarship readily available to nonspecialists who want to meet the historical Jesus. Eminent biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan collaborates with pastor Richard G. Watts to rediscover the life, the work, and the message of the Man from Galilee.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780664258429
  • Publisher: Presbyterian Pub Corp
  • Publication date: 10/28/2013
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 726,138
  • Product dimensions: 5.04 (w) x 8.06 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author


John Dominic Crossan is Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. He is the author of many best-selling books, including The Historical Jesus and The Birth of Christianity, which was chosen by Publisher's Weekly as one of the ten best religious books of 1998.

Richard G. Watts is a former pastor of New Covenant Community in Normal, Illinois, a union congregation of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), The Prebyterian Church (U.S.A.), and the United Methodist Church.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Why This Book? ix
Chapter 1 Why Not Just Read the Gospels? 1
Chapter 2 Son of God, Son of the Virgin Mary? 8
Chapter 3 What Does John the Baptist Have to Do with Jesus? 25
Chapter 4 What Did Jesus Teach? 40
Chapter 5 Did Jesus Perform Miracles? 60
Chapter 6 Did Jesus Intend to Start a New Religion? 81
Chapter 7 Who Executed Jesus and Why? 94
Chapter 8 What Happened on Easter Sunday? 118
Chapter 9 How Do You Get from Jesus to Christ? 133
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2007

    Crossan's evidence is lacking

    Crossan begins his work by advocating that the gospels are full of inconsistencies. The problem with Crossan¿s position is that the items he points out as major discrepancies are not major issues at all. The main points of the gospels are not inconsistent. Crossan advocates that since the gospels have inconsistencies, they should not be read as biographical, but rather as the interpretative theology of the gospel writers. However, Crossan fails to deal with the fact that writers can have different theological emphasis in their writing while at the same time writing the absolute truth about a particular situation. Craig Bloomberg pointed out in his interview with Lee Strobel in the book, The Case for Christ, that just because Mark does not cover Jesus¿ early life in his book does not make the gospels suspect. He points out that Mark¿s failure to cover Jesus¿ early life was consistent with the manner in which biographies of this period were written. The writer was not and often times did not tell of a person¿s entire life from birth. They simply wrote about the portions which were historically important. Additionally, Bloomberg points out that Mark had a different theological concentration when he wrote about Christ¿s life. He goes on to point out that Mark believed the most important emphasis in Christ¿s life was the crucifixion, resurrection, and the meaning of those events for humanity. Thus those are the events upon which he spent most of his time writing. It does not mean that the other times in Christ¿s life did not occur or where not important, they are just not what he emphasized. The same can be said of the other gospel authors. This would certainly be a valid counter point to Crossan¿s position, but Crossan never addressed any counter points concerning the historical reliability of the gospels. He simply put forward a position and moved forward as if his position concerning the gospels were accepted mainstream facts of theological scholarship, which they are not. Crossan continues to attempt to criticize the historical reliability of the gospels by using several alternative texts such as ¿Q¿, the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of Peter. Crossan seems to leave the reader with the impression that these so-called gospels are new discoveries and really seem to have shed some new previously undiscovered light on the canonical gospels. What Crossan fails to admit is that these so-called gospels are Gnostic Gospels. Gnosticism came about and was dealt with in the first century by the church. There is nothing new in these gospels that was not reviewed and deemed to be heretical in nature by the first century church. Gnosticism appears to me to have greatly influenced Crossan¿s overall theology and historical analysis. Crossan like the Gnostics specifically denies the divinity of Christ and all of the deeds and actions, such as healings, miracles, and resurrection that would accompany a divine Christ. Crossan also fails to disclose the rigorous process of how the gospels were canonized and also fails to disclose the reason why the other books were not. Along a similar line, Crossan denies that Christ was executed to fulfill the prophecies and to atone for man¿s sin. Crossan advocates that Christ was crucified because of his actions in the temple and was not buried in a tomb, but an unmarked grave. He basically makes Christ out to be a social reformer who sought not by supernatural healings to reunite all of society, but by his actions of challenging and spending time with the outcast of that society. This appears to be further denial of the divinity of Christ, which is consistent with Gnosticism¿s influence in Crossan¿s theology. Crossan believes the writers of the gospel wrote these stories of Christ¿s death and resurrection after his death to make sense of it and to fulfill the prophecies of the Old Testament. If that is the case then why include all the embarrassing issues like the empty tomb being first discovered by

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2002

    Illiterate?

    About the only thing I disagree with is Crossan's implication that Christ was "illiterate." He READ from the Torah fot God's sake! C'mon! Dominic, please, at least READ THE BIBLE BEFORE you go off on your usual wild goose chase.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2002

    Who Is Jesus?: Answers to Your Questions about the Historical Jesus

    This book provides a brief compilation of Crossan's lifelong study of the historical Jesus and the origins of Christianity. It's greatest strength lies in the clarity of the text which may be due mostly to the collaboration of Richard G. Watts. The format is helpful as the book is divided into nine chapters organized around such topics as the miracles attributed to Jesus and the events on Easter Sunday. Within each chapter the authors attempt to answer specific questions. Jesus is described as an eloquent but illiterate peasant who lives in an occupied land. He offers an alternative vision of a community of equals before God and each other. Free healing and shared eating are the hallmarks of the new society. Jesus invites women, children, lepers and the destitute to join him in this experiment and then to take the message to others in an effort to create a Kingdom of God here and now on this earth. Jesus was executed brutally by the Romans but his power was still experienced by his followers after his death. The Kingdom of God of Jesus did not act as a broker between its believers and God. Jesus prevented that from happening by keeping himself constantly on the move and sending forth his followers only as itinerant missionaries. Such an organizational structure or lack of structure contrasted sharply with the design of the rival contemporary factions within Judaism as well as the Christian religion which evolved later from the Jesus movement. The reader may find some of Crossan's theories farfetched but nobody can fault him for not being original in his thinking.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2002

    Who Is Jesus?: Answers to Your Questions about the Historical Jesus

    Each chapter deals with a provocative topic worthy of a separate book. A good example is the chapter on the execution of Jesus. The authors propose that Jesus was arrested during the Passover festival by the Romans as a result of a disturbance in the Temple. He was then summarily crucified and probably was not buried but instead left as food for birds of prey and wild dogs. The theory is certainly not original but the depth of research behind it is impressive. The rest of the book seems to meet this same high standard.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2002

    Who Is Jesus?: Answers to Your Questions about the Historical Jesus

    On many levels Crossan and Watts have given us an amazing book about the life and work of the Man from Galilee. They also have allowed us the opportunity to find God in Jesus and have not rejected the idea that the POWER of God is available to us through Jesus.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2000

    easy 5 star read

    Crossan is great at crafting his historical Jesus in terms that everyone can understand in this very concise history of the man we know as Jesus.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)