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Who Owns America's Past?: The Smithsonian and the Problem of History [NOOK Book]

Overview

In 1994, when the National Air and Space Museum announced plans to display the Enola Gay, the B-29 sent to destroy Hiroshima with an atomic bomb, the ensuing political uproar left the museum's parent Smithsonian Institution entirely unprepared. As the largest such complex in the world, the Smithsonian cares for millions of objects and has displayed everything from George Washington's sword to moon rocks to Dorothy’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Why did this particular object arouse such controversy? From ...

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Who Owns America's Past?: The Smithsonian and the Problem of History

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Overview

In 1994, when the National Air and Space Museum announced plans to display the Enola Gay, the B-29 sent to destroy Hiroshima with an atomic bomb, the ensuing political uproar left the museum's parent Smithsonian Institution entirely unprepared. As the largest such complex in the world, the Smithsonian cares for millions of objects and has displayed everything from George Washington's sword to moon rocks to Dorothy’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Why did this particular object arouse such controversy? From an insider’s perspective, Robert C. Post’s Who Owns America’s Past? offers insight into the politics of display and the interpretation of history.

Never before has a book about the Smithsonian detailed the recent and dramatic shift from collection-driven shows, with artifacts meant to speak for themselves, to concept-driven exhibitions, in which objects aim to tell a story, displayed like illustrations in a book. Even more recently, the trend is to show artifacts along with props, sound effects, and interactive elements in order to create an immersive environment. Rather than looking at history, visitors are invited to experience it.

Who Owns America’s Past? examines the different ways that the Smithsonian’s exhibitions have been conceived and designed—whether to educate visitors, celebrate an important historical moment, or satisfy donor demands or partisan agendas. Post gives the reader a behind-the-scenes view of internal tempests as they brewed and how different personalities and experts passionately argued about the best way to present the story of America.

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Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
A pick for any collection strong in museum management and history... The result goes beyond a recommendation for arts holdings, examining how American history itself is documented and presented.
The American Historian - Steven Lubar
The Smithsonian finally gets its Washington insider-tells-all memoir... Who Owns America's Past? documents the value of the Smithsonian's distinctive culture — and also the way it has kept the institution from being all that it might be.
Museums and Social Issues - Nick Sacco
Post... weaves original primary source research, scholarly synthesis, and personal experiences into a highly readable study of the cultural history of America's most popular museum institution.
Choice
Post's thoughtful elucidation of the exhibits and the ensuing controversies demonstrate the complexities of the environment in the national museum in the 20th century. Further, this work documents the shifting priorities of the Smithsonian, revealing the many different actors that took part in the creation of both well-known exhibits and many smaller ones. The book also provides many interesting and important examples of the interconnections between historians of history and technology and the Smithsonian. This excellent work will be valuable to public historians as well as laypersons.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781421411019
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 10/2/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Robert C. Post, now curator emeritus, was employed by the Smithsonian for twenty-three years, beginning in 1973. He was responsible for several technological collections and story-driven exhibits. His books include Urban Mass Transit: The Life Story of a Technology and High Performance: The Culture and Technology of Drag Racing, 1950–2000, both published by Johns Hopkins. He also edited the quarterly journal Technology and Culture, also published by Johns Hopkins. The Society for the History of Technology awarded him the Leonardo da Vinci Medal, its highest honor. Who Owns America’s Past? combines information from hitherto-untapped archival sources, extensive interviews, a thorough review of the secondary literature, and considerable personal experience.

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