Who Reached the South Pole First?

Who Reached the South Pole First?

by Sheila Griffin Llanas
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott push across the dangerous Antarctic land. Both players are driven to be the first to reach the South Pole. But only one player can win the race. Who reached the South Pole first?

History is full of amazing discoveries and inventions. But it's not always clear who should get the credit. Period photographs and colorful maps

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott push across the dangerous Antarctic land. Both players are driven to be the first to reach the South Pole. But only one player can win the race. Who reached the South Pole first?

History is full of amazing discoveries and inventions. But it's not always clear who should get the credit. Period photographs and colorful maps take you on an amazing race through time and around the world. Find out who claimed victory in some of history's most intriguing races.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Danielle Williams
Throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, explorers turned their attentions to the North and South Poles. The number of explorers seeking to reach the poles, as well as a surge in national pride, turned many expeditions into races. Any journey into the extreme conditions found at either pole was fraught with danger that was only intensified by the lack of understanding and preparedness regarding travel to the poles. In 1909, two explorers set out to be the first to reach the South Pole. Roald Amundsen was an experienced explorer and Robert Falcon Scott was an experienced navel officer, but their lack of understanding of the extreme conditions at the poles made their journeys perilous. Leaving within months of each other, Amundsen and Scott spent the long winter in Antarctica at separate camps before beginning their separate journeys to the pole the following spring. Llanas alternates telling the story of Scott and Amundsen, managing to add tension to the tales of both explorers' expeditions to the pole despite the slow pace of the actual expeditions. Filled with images of the explorers on their journeys, the text will whet the appetite of children anxious to learn about adventurers. Part of the "Fact Finders. Race for History" series. Reviewer: Danielle Williams
School Library Journal
Gr 3�6—Sometimes it takes a unique method to present history in a way that is fresh and interesting to children. Pitting historical figures against one another in a contest to see who legitimately accomplished famous achievements is such a device. This series uses clear language, colorful pictures, and primary sources to debunk potentially inaccurate perceptions of historical events. For example, readers learn in America that Christopher Columbus might have been preceded to these shores by Vikings or ancient Siberians, and will be kept in suspense until the "winner" is revealed at the end. Vocabulary definitions are provided on each page, with a separate glossary in the back. History-loving readers will find this series engaging, exciting, and informative.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429633444
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
12/01/2010
Series:
Race for History Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
710L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >