BN.com Gift Guide

Who Took My Hairy Toe?

( 2 )

Overview

Old Tar Pockets was a greedy old man, always taking things that weren't his. One Halloween, while digging for sweet potatoes in his neighbor's garden, he dug up a huge hairy toe! "Finders, keepers!" he said to himself as he stuffed the toe into his pocket.But also in his pocket was a glob of tar he had stolen, and soon the toe was stuck to the tar and his hand was stuck to the toe! And then that night something big ans scary came in search of its missing toe. "Who took my hairy toe?" the creature's voice kept ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $4.79   
  • New (1) from $147.54   
  • Used (4) from $4.79   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$147.54
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(196)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Old Tar Pockets was a greedy old man, always taking things that weren't his. One Halloween, while digging for sweet potatoes in his neighbor's garden, he dug up a huge hairy toe! "Finders, keepers!" he said to himself as he stuffed the toe into his pocket.But also in his pocket was a glob of tar he had stolen, and soon the toe was stuck to the tar and his hand was stuck to the toe! And then that night something big ans scary came in search of its missing toe. "Who took my hairy toe?" the creature's voice kept calling, growing louder and louder, closer and closer...Katya Krenina's rich illustrations lend just the right spooky note to Shutta Crum's vivid retelling of this popular folk tale.

An old man known for taking what isn't his picks up the wrong thing one Halloween night, and its owner wants it back.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
...a smooth and lively retelling that will send shivers down the listener's spine.
Booklist
Ages 4-8. Opening with a riveting first sentence, this spine-tingling rendition of a familiar folktale recounts the "ruination" of sticky-fingered Old Tar Pockets after he digs up a monster's furry toe in his neighbor's garden one Halloween. Like Crum's language, Krenina's illustrations give the tale a country setting, and though they're not going to register as strongly on the "scream-o-meter" as the story itself (the huge russet creature with the bandaged foot seems more comical than terrifying), they do have a supportively gloomy atmosphere. Crum ends the tale with a detailed source note and an apothegm: "Just as long as what's in your pockets is yours . . .
DeAnn Tabuchi
K-Gr 3-In the same vein as "Teeny Tiny" and "The Golden Arm," this retelling of a popular Southern folktale will delight, if not frighten, the storyhour crowd. The language begs to be read aloud, with a bit of a drawl, with just the right touch of spookiness. On All Hallows' Eve, a greedy old man steals some tar from his neighbor and puts it in his pocket. Next he is digging in his neighbor's garden and finds a big hairy toe, covered in fur. He puts that into his pocket, too, and heads home. Unfortunately for him, when he goes to retrieve his goods, he finds his hand stuck to the hardened tar that, in turn, is stuck to the digit. A creature comes looking for it, repeating the refrain, "Who took my hairy toe?" The beast ends up taking the old man along with the missing part. The muted, earthy, gouache illustrations are appropriately creepy. The dark, hairy, red-eyed ogre may be too much for the youngest readers, but the older children will love it.
San Anselmo Public Library, CA
Children's Literature
An appropriate addition to any collection of scary stories told around the campfire—especially at Halloween—Crum's retold fable may have come to America with its earliest settlers. Selfish Old Tar Pockets tries to grab anything from his neighbors that might prove useful to him later. But when he steals tar from one neighbor and hides it in his pocket, the stage is set for his downfall. Digging for sweet potatoes in another neighbor's garden, he comes across a big, hairy toe. That, too, follows the tar into his pocket, and that same night the adventure begins. The frightful creature whose toe is missing hunts down the thief to claim it back. Krenina's illustrations bring the whole situation to life—almost too realistically. Undoubtedly the tale is an effective tool for teaching young children to keep their hands to themselves, but in the process it may also scare the living daylights out of them so that on every wind they hear screams. And if a child inadvertently takes something that doesn't belong to him, he may be afraid of being carried off in the night. Perhaps the book should carry a label for parents—"Read to kids at your own risk." 2001, Albert Whitman, $15.95. Ages 8 up. Reviewer: Earlene Viano
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-In the same vein as "Teeny Tiny" and "The Golden Arm," this retelling of a popular Southern folktale will delight, if not frighten, the storyhour crowd. The language begs to be read aloud, with a bit of a drawl, with just the right touch of spookiness. On All Hallows' Eve, a greedy old man steals some tar from his neighbor and puts it in his pocket. Next he is digging in his neighbor's garden and finds a big hairy toe, covered in fur. He puts that into his pocket, too, and heads home. Unfortunately for him, when he goes to retrieve his goods, he finds his hand stuck to the hardened tar that, in turn, is stuck to the digit. A creature comes looking for it, repeating the refrain, "Who took my hairy toe?" The beast ends up taking the old man along with the missing part. The muted, earthy, gouache illustrations are appropriately creepy. The dark, hairy, red-eyed ogre may be too much for the youngest readers, but the older children will love it.-DeAnn Tabuchi, San Anselmo Public Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This folktale has been a favorite for many storytellers and Crum, a storyteller herself, provides a smooth and lively retelling that will send shivers down the listener's spine. Old Tar Pockets is a truly greedy man who steals warm, soft tar from a neighbor's bucket and sticks it in his pocket as it is the only thing he has to carry it back home. He also digs up "sweet taters" for supper-but in the process he finds a big, hairy toe. He sticks the toe in the same pocket as the tar, and it sticks tight. That night, he hears a voice crying, "WHO TOOK MY HAIRY TOE?" so he crawls under the quilt to escape, but the voice keeps asking the question. At last, he answers, begging the beast to take it, but, since it is stuck in his pocket, the beast carries Old Tar Pockets away. The tale ends with the folk saying, " ‘Pay that no nevermind! It's just Old Tar Pockets getting his due.' I say, ‘Just as long as what's in your pocket is yours . . . I wouldn't worry about it.' " Illustrations begin with bright and sunny rural landscapes, but soon become somber, dark, and scary as the telling gets progressively scarier. The beast is suitably ghostly until the last two spreads, where he is depicted as huge and furry as he carts Tar Pockets off. An author's note cites sources for the tale and the variants, which include the British "Teeny Tiny Bone" and the Midwestern "Tailipoo." (Folktale. 5-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807559727
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 9/28/2001
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Lexile: 550L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Shutta Crum

Poet and storyteller Shutta Crum has published a number of picture books for children, including Who Took My Hairy Toe, Fox and Fluff, and All on a Sleepy Night. Shutta lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she has been a youth librarian for over twenty years.

Artist John Beder is the illustrator of Mama Loves to Mambo, Mole and Shrew the Whole Year Through, and Grizzly Pete and the Ghosts. He has also created art for movies, animation, and greeting cards. John lives in Comox, British Columbia.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2008

    My Class Loved It!

    I teach a special ed class and decided to read the book to them and have them use a communication device to participate in the story. This was one of the few stories that held all of my students captive. We read it to some of our regular ed buddy classes and had them spellbound as well. It was not to scary for my younger elementary students, but each child who hears it will remember the lesson of the story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2001

    CHILDREN WILL LIKE IT, PARENTS & TEACHERS ENJOY IT TOO!

    Crum's first book is a refreshing retelling of a folkstory about a tad-bit shady or spooky character (Old Tar Pockets),in a halloween-like setting in the countryside, with a 'what will happen next?' hook. Crum's delightfuly and scary (not frightening) tale draws in children from 2-5 and older. Crum, a dedicated storyteller and librarian, craves out a new version of what she may have heard as a youngster in the South. In this book, with the aid of eye-catching illustrations by Krenina, Crum gives life to a fascinating character who swipes a monster's hairy toe. An experienced writer and storyteller, Crum's style is both polished and readable by parents, teachers, storytellers, and librarians. This is but a promising first of several children's books forthcoming from Crum. This one is receiveing acclaim, and this reader is looking forward to the next. Give it as a gift, and read it to youngsters as soon as possible; they'll enjoy it too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)