Who Uses This?

Who Uses This?

by Margaret Miller
     
 

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A Hammer. A Rolling pin. A watering can. A paintbrush...Guess who uses these and other tools of the trades, and join grown-ups at work and children at play with each one.

Overview

A Hammer. A Rolling pin. A watering can. A paintbrush...Guess who uses these and other tools of the trades, and join grown-ups at work and children at play with each one.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Miller, the creator of the recent Whose Hat? , has produced another pleasing, full-color photo-essay for the youngest child. The book devotes four pages to each of its nine ``subjects,'' first asking ``Who uses this?'' as a photo of the object is shown on the facing page. The following spread depicts adults employing the object on the left page, while a child makes use of it in a simpler, frequently humorous, fashion on the right. The objects--including a hammer, paintbrush, rolling pin and watering can--are shown again and labeled on the last page. Miller has carefully chosen and posed her models, achieving a non-sexist and racially inclusive mix. (Parents might enjoy picking out Mitch Miller and Chuck Close in the photos.) This is a handsome and useful vehicle to reinforce object recognition skills. Ages 2-up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Joni Lucas
Professions such as barber, conductor, baker and football player are introduced in this enjoyable picture book. Full-color photographs of tools such as a hammer, watering can and paint brush that are used on the job are featured with the question, "Who uses this?" On subsequent pages, the professionals using the tools are pictured along with children using the tools themselves. This book is a great way to help children explore their expanding world, to learn about some common jobs and see that they can paint, juggle, build and bake, too. It also offers opportunities to let children think about future careers and do a little daydreaming. If a parent's career is one of the ones depicted, it offers a perfect way to teach their children about how they earn a living. 1999 (orig.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-- A photographic concept book that employs the same format as its companion, Whose Hat? (Greenwillow, 1988). Bold, black type asks ``Who uses this?'' The next page shows a single item (a hammer, a football, a paintbrush, scissors, etc.). The following two pages depict an adult using the item at work and a child or children using the item at play. Most of the objects can be easily identified by young children, with the exceptions of a leash (professional dogwalker) and a baton (orchestra conductor). The young models are attractive and energetic, without seeming too precious. The full-page photographs are topnotch--clear, bright, inviting, and void of gender and racial stereotypes. While not an essential purchase, this will be an entertaining addition to preschool collections. Two similar titles, Roy's Whose Hat Is That? (1987) and Whose Shoes Are These? (1988, both Clarion) offer more text but less appealing black-and-white photographs. --Heide Piehler, Shorewood Public Library, WI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688170578
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/28/1999
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.71(w) x 7.99(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

In Her Own Words...

"When I was growing up, my mother was the family photographer. Often I would stand at her side in the darkroom watching the image mysteriously appear in the developer. I thought it was magic.

"After college I worked in children's book publishing for eight years and then took time off to be at home with our two children, Kate and Jacob. Like my mother, I became the selfappointed family photographer, and I quickly discovered how Much I enjoyed taking pictures. I loved the pursuit of my subject; the tension of waiting to press the shutter; and the thrill of realizing that I had captured a special moment.

"I went back into the darkroom with my mother, but this time as her student. I took courses and I read about photography, but mostly I practiced with my camera, taking pictures everywhere—from family gatherings to grade school portraits.

"My ideas for my books have been inspired by my experiences with our children. My son's love of hats, the silly guessing games we played on long trips, and my daughter's delight when she learned to tie her shoe are the starting points for my books.

"Working as a photographer with young children is challenging because it is so unpredictable. A three-year-old may cooperate for five minutes or two hours. It's my job to make the photo session into a play date because if the child is having fun, the pictures will be natural and full of life. I photograph the children in my neighborhood, not professional models, because I want them to look like the everyday kids who read my books.

"I feel very lucky to be a writer and photographer of children's books. Through my camera I am blessed with a strong connection to my past as well, and each book is a brand new adventure in the future."

In Her Own Words...

"When I was growing up, my mother was the family photographer. Often I would stand at her side in the darkroom watching the image mysteriously appear in the developer. I thought it was magic.

"After college I worked in children's book publishing for eight years and then took time off to be at home with our two children, Kate and Jacob. Like my mother, I became the selfappointed family photographer, and I quickly discovered how Much I enjoyed taking pictures. I loved the pursuit of my subject; the tension of waiting to press the shutter; and the thrill of realizing that I had captured a special moment.

"I went back into the darkroom with my mother, but this time as her student. I took courses and I read about photography, but mostly I practiced with my camera, taking pictures everywhere—from family gatherings to grade school portraits.

"My ideas for my books have been inspired by my experiences with our children. My son's love of hats, the silly guessing games we played on long trips, and my daughter's delight when she learned to tie her shoe are the starting points for my books.

"Working as a photographer with young children is challenging because it is so unpredictable. A three-year-old may cooperate for five minutes or two hours. It's my job to make the photo session into a play date because if the child is having fun, the pictures will be natural and full of life. I photograph the children in my neighborhood, not professional models, because I want them to look like the everyday kids who read my books.

"I feel very lucky to be a writer and photographer of children's books. Through my camera I am blessed with a strong connection to my past as well, and each book is a brand new adventure in the future."

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