Who Wants Pizza?: The Kids' Guide to the History, Science and Culture of Food

Overview

Part of the loosely constructed series by Jan Thornhill, which already includes This Is My Planet and I Found a Dead Bird, Who Wants Pizza? is brimming with no-nonsense facts that illustrate the importance of food choices and the practices surrounding food production. Full of direct, eye-opening information about why we need to eat, where our food comes from, how much of it we have, and why some food choices are wiser than others, the book covers a lot of important ground. Topics are easy to dip into and include ...

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Overview

Part of the loosely constructed series by Jan Thornhill, which already includes This Is My Planet and I Found a Dead Bird, Who Wants Pizza? is brimming with no-nonsense facts that illustrate the importance of food choices and the practices surrounding food production. Full of direct, eye-opening information about why we need to eat, where our food comes from, how much of it we have, and why some food choices are wiser than others, the book covers a lot of important ground. Topics are easy to dip into and include digestion, the domestication of animals, different cultures’ table etiquette, sustainable agriculture, and the evolution of farming and food preservation. Short blocks of bite-sized text, just the right amount of “icky” info that kids love, plus a visually stimulating layout that uses captivating photo-illustration collages all add up to make Who Wants Pizza? a fun, fact-filled look at all things food-related.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Following her books on global warming and life cycles, Thornhill gets the easy question out of the way first ("Who Wants Pizza? I do! And probably you do, too"), before moving onto thornier issues of where food comes from and if there's enough to go around. Amid color photographs and sidebars, Thornhill writes concisely about hunter-gatherers, agriculture, processed foods, globalization, and poverty, among numerous other topics, providing a straightforward and balanced overview of the modern food industry, and the choices readers have when it comes to their own meals. Ages 9–13. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
Written by an award winning writer and illustrator of books for children, this introduction to the wonderful (and wacky) world of food is just what is needed to get youngsters interested in what they put in their mouths and how that effects their bodies. Visually arresting with its myriad of color photos and boxed texts, the book is divided into four sections: Why Eat? which includes how our bodies use food and how we react to food; How It All Started, includes how humans evolved from nomads to farmers to food preservers to chefs; Changing Food, including how food production has changed over the years and Food for Thought, featuring how production is impacting the world and why food choices matter. The variety of issues within this framework is fascinating and should lead to some interesting discussion as well as further research. A brief glossary and sources for further study are included, as well as an index. Reviewer: Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.
From the Publisher

"No child - nor uninformed adult, for that matter - should be able to read Who Wants Pizza? without rethinking their relationship with food."
Quill & Quire, starred review

"No doubt even adult readers will learn something from this engaging book."
ForeWord Reviews

“To truly understand the significance of what we eat, take a look at this book…Nutrition for the mind, a treat for the intellect.”
YA Books Central

ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year, Juvenile Non-Fiction Category, Finalist 2010

Kirkus Reviews

Starting with a lonely slice of pizza pictured on the cover and the first page, Thornhill launches into a wide-ranging study of the history and culture of food—where it comes from, how to eat it and what our food industries are doing to the planet. It's a lot to hang on that slice of pizza, but there are plenty of interesting tidbits here, from Clarence Birdseye's experiments with frozen food to how mad cow disease causes the brain to turn spongy to industrial food production and global warming. Unfortunately, the volume is designed like a bad high-school yearbook. Most pages are laid out in text boxes, each containing a paragraph on a discrete topic, but with little in the way of an organizing theme to tie together the content of the page or spread. Too many colors, too much jumbled-together information and total reliance on snippets of information make this a book for young readers more interested in browsing than reading. Kids at the upper edge of the book's range would be better served by Richie Chevat's adaptation of Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma (2009). (Nonfiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781897349977
  • Publisher: Owlkids Books
  • Publication date: 9/1/2010
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 381,367
  • Age range: 9 - 13 Years
  • Lexile: 1110L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 10.40 (h) x 0.20 (d)

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