Who Was Sitting Bull?: And Other Questions about the Battle of Little Bighorn

Overview

By the mid-1800s, thousands of white settlers were traveling westward through the Great Plains. Pioneers built farms and ranches, and companies laid railroads and dug mines. But the plains were the homeland and hunting grounds for many Native Americans. To protect their traditional lands, Native American warriors attacked white homes and settlements. The U.S. government tried to keep the peace by promising to keep white settlers and soldiers out of Native American territories. But the government broke its promise...

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Overview

By the mid-1800s, thousands of white settlers were traveling westward through the Great Plains. Pioneers built farms and ranches, and companies laid railroads and dug mines. But the plains were the homeland and hunting grounds for many Native Americans. To protect their traditional lands, Native American warriors attacked white homes and settlements. The U.S. government tried to keep the peace by promising to keep white settlers and soldiers out of Native American territories. But the government broke its promise in treaty after treaty. The conflict between the U.S. Army and Native American nations peaked in 1876 in Montana at the Battle of Little Bighorn the last great battle of the American West.

So What Native American Groups were Involved in the Battle?

Who Led the U.S. Soldiers?

How did the Battle Change Life for Native Americans Living on the Great Plains?

Discover the facts about the Battle of Little Bighorn and learn more about the westward expansion of the United States.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761352303
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/2011
  • Series: Six Questions of American History Series
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 1,178,989
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 820L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction 4

1 Trouble Brewing 6

2 Broken Promises 12

3 A Great Gathering 18

4 A Bad Omen 22

5 The Battle Begins 28

6 Defeat From Victory 34

Primary Source: Survivors' Stories 42

Tell Your Little Bighorn Story 43

Timeline 44

Source Notes 46

Selected Bibliography 46

Further Reading and Websites 47

Index 48

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2011

    This is a fascinating, informative overview of "the last great battle of the American West," the Battle of Little Big Horn ...

    In the mid-1800s men were anxious to head to the western parts of the United States for an assortment of reasons, some more pressing than others. The open lands drew those who wanted to farm, while the gold of the Black Hills appealed to those who wanted a chance at securing their fortune by mining. There were "tens of thousands of miles of open land," yet there remained one problem . . . it was a land that already belonged to another group of people, the Native Americans. They soon found themselves resenting the white intruders. The Lakota were comprised of "seven Native American groups" whose cultures were similar. The Black Hills Lakota "felt close to `Wakan Tanka, the Great Spirit." When they hunted the buffalo there was no waste as they used every part of the animal after they "offered prayers to its spirit."

    The Native Americans would soon discover that the white newcomers had little respect for their culture or the buffalo, an animal they wantonly slaughtered. Several Native American Leaders, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, and Crazy Horse were respected leaders of powerful tribes. One of the most powerful, Sitting Bull, "wanted a peaceful life, but he did not want to live among white people. Peace soon became out of the question when U. S. soldiers massacred "more than 150 people," most of them women and children, at Sand Creek in 1864. The Indians began to strike back as the government tried to force their people into reservations. Treaties were set forth, but as Sitting Bull claimed, "What treaty has the white man ever kept? Not one." In this book you will find out what happened as a result of their discontent. You will learn what happened when the Native Americans encountered Colonel George Armstrong Custer and his troops at the Battle of Little Big Horn.

    This is a fascinating, informative overview of "the last great battle of the American West," the Battle of Little Big Horn. This book sequentially answers six questions about the battle. For example, the lead in for the fourth chapter asks, "When would the battle take place." This well researched text has an excellent flow to it, something that even the most reluctant reader will be attracted to. One of the things I was most drawn to were the sidebars that were presented in the shape of a small notebook. They added many interesting historical vignettes on such subjects as the Ghost Dance, Custer's soldiers, and Kate Bighead's eyewitness account of the battle. Unfamiliar words such as "encampment" are boxed (they do not detract from the reading) and are defined on the side of the text. There are numerous photographs, Indian art reproductions, and maps interspersed throughout the book. In the back of the book is an index, a page on primary sources, a suggested writing activity, a timeline, source notes, a bibliography, and additional recommended book and website resources to explore. There are free downloadable educational resources on the publishers website.

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