BN.com Gift Guide

Who Won the War?

( 13 )

Overview

Who will win as the curtain closes on the war between the girls and the boys?
Summer vacation is almost over and after one year in Buckman it looks like the Malloy girls will be going home to Ohio. The Hatford boys are relieved to finally be rid of Eddie, Beth and Caroline, also known as the Womper, the Weirdo and the Crazy.

As the clock ticks away at their final days, Jake and Eddie keep up the competing, tricking and scheming until Eddie puts...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $2.84   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Who Won the War?

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Who will win as the curtain closes on the war between the girls and the boys?
Summer vacation is almost over and after one year in Buckman it looks like the Malloy girls will be going home to Ohio. The Hatford boys are relieved to finally be rid of Eddie, Beth and Caroline, also known as the Womper, the Weirdo and the Crazy.

As the clock ticks away at their final days, Jake and Eddie keep up the competing, tricking and scheming until Eddie puts Jake up to the biggest dare of the year. She wants to prove once and for all that the girls are in charge. Jake can't back away and let the girls declare victory. The wacky war that began the day the girls arrived isn't over yet!

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The characters are well developed through their dialogue, actions, and relationships with one another. Fans of the earlier books will want to read this engaging novel to decide for themselves who really won the war.”
—School Library Journal
Children's Literature - Valerie O. Patterson
In this tenth book in the series of girl-boy battle books, summer is coming to an end and so is the year that the three Malloy girls have been living next to the four Hatford boys in Buckman, West Virginia. In the few weeks before they are to return to Ohio, where their father will be teaching again, Eddie leads Beth and Caroline in the charge to prove to the boys that the girls have won the war. She challenges the boys to show them Knob Hill, Smuggler's Cove, and, riskiest of all, the abandoned coal mine that is strictly off limits. When a record heat wave shuts down electricity in Ohio on the eve of their move, the girls and their mother end up staying temporarily with the Hartfords, to the boys' and the girls' dismay. More antics ensue as the war escalates, and the visit to the coal mine on a dare lands them in more trouble than any of them bargained for. Newbery-winning author Phyllis Reynolds Naylor ends the series with a flourish. As for who won the war, that is a matter of debate.
VOYA - Julie Watkins
It's official: After an adventurous year in Buckman, West Virginia, the three Malloy sisters will be returning to their Ohio home at summer's end. Although they will miss many things about Buckman, their sworn enemies, the Hatford boys, are not among them. For their part, the boys are ecstatic. At long last, they will be rid of the annoying girls who have challenged and competed with them all year. Neither side will concede that it has been one of the most exciting times of their lives, largely because of the rivalry. Before the Malloys' departure, the girls and boys have a few more tricks up their sleeves. In the war that has raged since the day they met, both sides are determined to emerge triumphant. In their quest for victory, will they carry the dares and pranks too far? Young fans will revel in the final escapades of the Hatfords and Malloys. As in the earlier novels, the tone is lighthearted and amusing. Beloved author Naylor has a knack for creating characters who appeal to her audience and keep them coming back for more fun. The lively pace and ongoing banter among the characters helps to compensate for the plot, which tends to be redundant. Public and school librarians will want to order several copies of this last adventure in the battle of girls versus boys.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-The battle began when the Malloy girls moved from Ohio to West Virginia for a year, staying in a house across the river from the Hatford boys. In this final volume of the series, a power failure in Ohio causes the girls to remain in Buckman longer than expected, and they move in with the Hatfords. Rivalry, silliness, and pranks occur during the big underwear switcheroo, the invasion of the ladybugs, and the frying of eggs on the sidewalk. When the girls and boys secretly explore an abandoned coal mine on a double-dare, they become witnesses to an explosion caused by a stranger and ultimately aid the police in solving the mystery. The characters are well developed through their dialogue, actions, and relationships with one another. Fans of the earlier books will want to read this engaging novel to decide for themselves who really wins the war.-Rebecca Sheridan, Easttown Library & Information Center, Berwyn, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440419914
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 7/8/2008
  • Series: Boy/Girl Battle Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 295,833
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor has written over a hundred books, many taking place in West Virginia. The author lives in Bethesda, MD.

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

One

The News

It was official: they were going back.

After Mrs. Malloy put down the phone, Caroline sneaked a look at her two older sisters. Was either of them going to cry?

It certainly wouldn’t be Eddie, the oldest. Beth? Possible, but not likely. No, if anyone was going to get emotional about leaving Buckman, it would be Caroline herself. She swallowed.

“Well,” said their mother. “I guess that’s that.”

“Goodbye, West Virginia! Hello, Ohio!” said Eddie.

When Mr. Malloy had taken a job at the college in Buckman on a teacher-exchange program, they’d all known that it would only be for a year. He had been offered other jobs too in Buckman, however, and the girls—and even their mother—had wondered if he might decide to stay.

But now he was back in Ohio, he’d signed the contract, and the Malloys would be moving on August 24. The Bensons, whose house the Malloys had been renting, would be back on August 31.

There was silence around the dinner table. The shrimp salad sat half eaten on their plates, the lemon slices undisturbed in the iced tea.

“Well, at least I get to finish out summer baseball,” Eddie said at last. She’d be entering middle school when they got back home.

“I think I’m going to be sad,” said Beth, who was a year younger. “I’ll miss the library—being able to walk to it, I mean.”

“I’ll miss the river and the swinging footbridge,” said Caroline, age nine. She had a dark ponytail, while her two older sisters were blond.

More silence.

Then Eddie started to grin. “What I won’t miss . . . ,” she began, glancing at the others, and the three girls chimed together, “the Hatfords!” They laughed, but Caroline knew it wasn’t true. They would miss the boys.

“Do you remember the day we moved in here?” Eddie asked her sisters.

“How could we forget?” said Beth. “We caught them up on the roof of their house, watching us from across the river.”

“And they dumped dead birds and squirrels on our side to make us think the river was polluted, just so we’d go back to Ohio,” said Caroline.

“Why, you never told me that!” said her mother.

“Ha!” said Eddie. “We never told you half the stuff those stupid guys did!”

Caroline knew, of course, that the Hatford brothers—Jake and Josh and Wally and Peter—weren’t stupid in the least. Annoying, disgusting, and conniving, yes, but they had outwitted the girls on several occasions and entertained them on others, and though Eddie might not admit it, the girls had never had so much fun in their lives.

Later that evening, when Mrs. Malloy was packing up books in the living room and the girls were doing the dishes, Eddie said, “You know, if we’ve got only three more weeks here, we’d better make them count.”

“Doing what?” asked Beth.

“Showing the Hatford boys once and for all who’s in charge, what else?”

“In charge of what?” asked Caroline. “We’re moving back to Ohio. How can we be in charge of anything?”

“In charge of us! In charge of them! What I mean is, we have to show them we won.”

“I didn’t know we were at war,” said Beth.

“Of course you did,” said Eddie. “War broke out the first day we got here! I just don’t want those guys telling the Benson boys that they led us around by the nose all year. That they tricked us so many times we didn’t know up from down. We’ve got to pull a couple more tricks ourselves.”

“Maybe we could just do something fun with them,” said Beth. “We don’t have to fight.”

“Did I say fight?” asked Eddie. “I simply want them to remember that the Malloys are not to be messed with. We’ll have fun, all right. Trust me.”

Caroline sighed and took the pan Beth handed her, wiped it off, and put it back in the cupboard. Everything was a competition with Eddie—a race, a contest. There had to be winners and losers, first place and second. The champions and the defeated.

All that Caroline, actress-to-be, wanted to do before they left was sneak into the old elementary school auditorium a few more times and act out little scenes up on a real stage. Her elementary school back in Ohio didn’t have an auditorium with plush seats for the audience. It didn’t have a stage with lights and scenery and a velvet curtain to pull when a perfor- mance was over. The only place to put on a production in the school back home was the gym, which also served as a lunchroom and usually smelled of bananas and pizza.

“So,” said Beth to Eddie. “What are we going to do?”

Eddie’s eyes narrowed. In fact, they almost seemed to glow, Caroline thought. Like a wolf’s eyes. Glowing eyes on Eddie were bad news. They meant she was up to something, and whatever it was, Beth and Caroline would get blamed for it too.

“Well, you know how Jake brags about all the wild things they used to do when the Bensons lived here?” Eddie said. “I’ll bet they didn’t do half the stuff he says they did. Knob Hill, the old Indian burial ground where the spirits roam at night? Ha! ‘Okay, Jake, take us there,’ I’m going to tell him. The old coal mine? ‘Hey, let’s go!’ Smuggler’s Cove? ‘I’m up for it!’ ”

Caroline didn’t especially like the sound of roam- ing spirits or an old coal mine. And the one time they had been to Smuggler’s Cove with the boys, she had almost got thrown into the water. But the possibility of Eddie and Beth doing anything without her was unthinkable. So she said what she had to say: “Sure.”

“We’ll tell Jake to put up or shut up,” said Eddie.

“But be nice to Josh,” said Beth. “He’s not so bad. And Peter’s cute. Wally? Wally is just . . .”

“Just Wally,” said Caroline.

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2006

    amazingly incredible

    This book has a great message to young readers and makes them wish they were in the lives of the hatforts or the malloys readers will wish the battle would never end.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Best book

    One of the best books i am going to by some more of this kind of books !!!! : )

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    Awesome book

    I would say it is a book for people in all ages in less you are a picky reader. It is so worth the money.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    What a good book

    Very good book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 7, 2011

    I love the series so much they should have a sequil and this time they are older and the pranks get more wild

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 26, 2010

    best book ever!!!!!!

    this book is very intertaining and a great series to read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    wow

    2006
    wow!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 30, 2011

    KAYLAA- DONTBUYIT

    Takes100dsofcreditcard

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)