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Who Would Have Thought It?
     

Who Would Have Thought It?

5.0 1
by Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Rosaura Sanchez (Editor), Maria A. Ruiz De Burton
 

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Fiction. Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT IT? (1872) is a historical romance which engages the dominant myths about nationality, race and gender prevalent in society in the United States prior to and during the Civil War. The narrative follows a young Mexican girl as she is delivered from Indian captivity in the Southwest and comes to live in

Overview

Fiction. Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton's WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT IT? (1872) is a historical romance which engages the dominant myths about nationality, race and gender prevalent in society in the United States prior to and during the Civil War. The narrative follows a young Mexican girl as she is delivered from Indian captivity in the Southwest and comes to live in the household of a New England family. Culture and perspectives on national history and identity clash as the novel criticizes the dominant society's opportunism and hypocrisy, and indicts northern racism.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The insights into class and race in this clever satire set during and after the Civil War give it a thoroughly contemporary feel. It is even more astounding, then, to learn that it was first published in 1872, and that the author was not even a native English speaker. Burton (The Squatter and the Don) was a Baja California native who married a colonel in the Union Army, and here she combines to good effect both solid insider information and her perspective as an outsider. Dr. Norval returns to New England from a trip west carrying more than luggage. While in an Indian camp, Norval rescued a ten-year-old girl, whose mother was a kidnapped Mexican woman desperate to return Lola to the girl's father. Lola is scorned both by the local gentry, who believe she is either black or Indian, and by the doctor's wife-at least until Dr. Norval reveals that she was accompanied by a lot of gold. When word of her wealth gets out, Lola is treated like a lady as the townspeople begin complex plans to get close to her and her money. The details are exquisite. Burton excels at picking names for these supposedly good Christians, from Mrs. Cackle to the Reverends Hackwell and Hammerhard. In short chapters with titles like ``Potations, Plotting and Propriety,'' Burton details the intricate mess of love and proposals-both honest and contrived. A thorough introduction traces specific themes like the novel's precocious portrayal of women entering the public sphere, and footnotes lend helpful historical background. In the end it is the story that counts, though, and this is a fully entertaining read that stands on its own against much of today's fiction. (Dec.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
This 1872 title was the author's first novel. Set in the post-Civil War United States, the story deals with the prejudice faced by a young Mexican girl rescued from Indian captivity who comes to live with a New England family.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558850811
Publisher:
Arte Publico Press
Publication date:
11/28/1995
Series:
Recovering the U. S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
298
Sales rank:
1,033,773
Product dimensions:
5.42(w) x 8.51(h) x 1.09(d)

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Who Would Have Thought It? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago