Who Would Like a Christmas Tree?: A Tree for All Seasons [NOOK Book]

Overview



Who would like a Christmas tree?
That all depends on when you ask.
In January, in February, in March, in April . . .
the black-capped chickadees, the field mice, the white-tailed deer, and the woodcock, come to claim the tree.
They want...
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Who Would Like a Christmas Tree?: A Tree for All Seasons

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Overview



Who would like a Christmas tree?
That all depends on when you ask.
In January, in February, in March, in April . . .
the black-capped chickadees, the field mice, the white-tailed deer, and the woodcock, come to claim the tree.
They want it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, for shelter and protection, for a place to start a new family.
Can a Christmas tree be all that?
Yes, and even more . . .
The year has just begun!
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Debby Willett
Life on a Christmas tree farm is busy year round and it is not just the farmer who has things to do. The black-capped chickadees count on the Christmas trees for three meals a day, as do the field mice that never hibernate and nibble the bark under the snow safe from predators. From the white-tailed deer that snacks early in the morning as well as late in the afternoon, and the robins that sit atop the Christmas trees and sing as the sun comes up each day, the tree farm is bustling with life well beyond the farmer and her family. Wild turkeys, wild flowers, monarch butterflies, and even garden spiders depend on the Christmas tree farm for food and protection during the year. But what keeps the Christmas tree farm going? Each December families go to the plantation to choose their special Christmas tree. The farmer provides hot cider and spicy Christmas cookies for each family. This book is a great reminder to every one of the practical resources that trees provide to wildlife. At the end of the book there is a description of how the farmer takes care of her Christmas tree farm. Educationally speaking, this book earns an "A". The colorful watercolor and ink illustrations complete the text, making it a more than just a nonfiction piece—it is also a story-telling gem. Reviewer: Debby Willett
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3–Though presented as a Christmas book, this informative introduction to the different animals inhabiting a Maine tree plantation can be enjoyed year round. For every month of the year, the title question is asked and answered in a couple of simple explanatory paragraphs by the various insects, birds, mammals, and even flowers that benefit from the trees. The charming watercolor and ink illustrations are rendered in naturalistic fashion using nature’s hues and cross-hatching techniques for shading and depth. Of course, in December, it is a family of humans who would like a Christmas tree. They are shown in the final tableau putting the finishing touches on their decorating and enjoying seasonal refreshments, with their pets and some visiting animals nearby. In a concluding spread, the farmer details the month-by-month care of the trees. An excellent resource for getting youngsters enthused about nature.–Linda Israelson, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
A patterned text using the titular question for each month is the structure for this ecologically themed Christmas story. For each month, a particular animal, bird or insect pipes up to describe why a particular Christmas tree is a good home. The first-person narration in the voice of each creature gives some additional information about that animal's environment, food and travels, and a double-page illustration offers close-up views of the animal in relation to the trees at the Christmas tree farm. The page for December shows two children and their father choosing the tree to take home to trim. The concluding pages give the common and scientific names for each animal with notes from the Christmas-tree farmer who served as an advisor for the book. A fine Christmas gift for a budding scientist. (Picture book. 3-7)
From the Publisher
"Hunter’s painterly watercolor and ink illustrations depict the various featured animals—black-capped chickadees, white-tailed deer, monarch butterflies, etc.—against an ever-present grove of fir trees in the background. The final pages show a happy family taking a tree home in December. End matter includes additional information on the ecology of a Christmas tree farm."—The Horn Book 

"Month by month, animal by animal, from aphids to wild turkeys, the whole year of a Christmas tree’s prolific usefulness is revealed. The book remains story-like enough for the very young and meaty enough for the older reader (and for the adult reader, who will learn much)."—Bookpage

"Cross-hatched ink and watercolor drawings create lovely, varied scenes of this special habitat in all seasons, while the text gives voice to the creatures sharing it with the fir trees. An original read-aloud choice for the Christmas season."—Booklist

"Though presented as a Christmas book, this informative introduction to the different animals inhabiting a Maine tree plantation can be enjoyed year round."—School Library Journal

"A patterned text using the titular question for each month is the structure for this ecologically themed Christmas story...The coinciding pages give the common and scientific names for each animal with notes from the Christmas-tree farmer who served as an advisor for the book. A fine Christmas gift for a budding scientist".—Kirkus

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547529431
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/28/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • File size: 38 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author



Ellen Bryan Obed grew up on a six-acre farm in Waterville, Maine, where she and her siblings waited for the first ice as most children wait for summer or Christmas or a birthday.
Ellen now lives with her husband in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine. There they experience many kinds of ice coming each winter to area streams, lakes, and ponds, and to the nearby Piscataquis River.


Anne Hunter lives on a farm in Vermont. Since attending Earlham College and graduating from the University of the Arts, she has worked full-time as an illustrator, well-known for her nature illustrations. Hunter has written and illustrated many children’s books, including Possum's Harvest Moon.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Sorry

    That hunyed, was supposed to be, hunted!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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