Whoa, Baby, Whoa!

Overview

Baby's on the move! Exploring the kitchen, finding out what things taste like, making a splash in the bathtub, this crawling cutie is ready to try everything! "Whoa, baby, whoa!" say Baby's family. They aren't sure Baby is big enough to be so adventurous. But when Baby gets ready for the biggest challenge of all-those very first steps-there's a warm welcome waiting when the whole family finally cheers, "Go, baby, go!"

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Overview

Baby's on the move! Exploring the kitchen, finding out what things taste like, making a splash in the bathtub, this crawling cutie is ready to try everything! "Whoa, baby, whoa!" say Baby's family. They aren't sure Baby is big enough to be so adventurous. But when Baby gets ready for the biggest challenge of all-those very first steps-there's a warm welcome waiting when the whole family finally cheers, "Go, baby, go!"

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Being an adventurous baby means having to hear the title phrase again and again. “Creeping to the kitchen to see what’s cooking,” writes Nichols, as Taylor, working in a style reminiscent of Helen Oxenbury, shows Baby stalking the dog’s food bowls. “Up goes the gate and Daddy comes running... ‘Whoa, Baby, Whoa! Hot things can burn you in the kitchen.’ ” But Baby never misses a beat (a relentlessness nicely conveyed in the typography’s comically wobbled kerning)—after all, there’s work to be done, whether it’s eating the newspaper, mangling Grandpa’s glasses, or flooding the bathroom. Even very young readers will note that the members of Baby’s mixed-race family are acting out of love, which may be why Baby never loses that sweet, knowing smile; this is a kid who knows a lot of people have his back. The tables turn nicely at the end, when Baby reasons that one way to put an end to his “Whoa” is to “try something new with myself” and take those long-anticipated first steps—prompting the onlookers to cheer “Go, Baby, Go!” Up to age 3. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Jayme Derbyshire
It's tough being little, especially when everything one seems to get into at the toddler age is off limits. The adorable little boy in this book is very busy practicing his new skills. Crawling, splashing in the tub, eating paper, and climbing on furniture tends to occupy this baby's day. With each new task comes a caring and protective family member lending a hand and a loving word pleading for the busy little guy to be careful. Despite the family members constantly telling the little boy to slow down, this little tyke motors on. Eventually the baby becomes more and more proficient with each skill set until he finally masters the biggest milestone of all...his first steps. With those first steps the baby no longer hears the words heeding him to be careful, but instead he hears words of encouragement and overwhelming pride. The illustrations are made up of beautiful soft watercolors. The family depicted by the illustrator is always pictured smiling and happy while in the presence of one another. The biracial family makes this book a wonderful lesson on how diverse families are these days and provides a family dynamic that many families can relate to. In general this cute story has an engaging storyline and diction that make it fun to read to oneself, or to share and read aloud.
Kirkus Reviews
An irrepressible, biracial baby crawls toward trouble at every turn, only to hear the titular refrain from safety-conscious family members. Translucent watercolors and loose lines capture the postures and behaviors of this busy child in a most convincing manner. The cycle of mild tension and relief repeats itself as he dumps and explores the contents of mother's purse, ascends the bookcase or proceeds toward the dog food. Each time, the tot's trajectory is diverted before disaster strikes. Nichols' blend of informal and precise rhymes--within a pattern of gerunds describing the baby's actions, followed by declarative sentences voicing the reprimands--yields a lively patter that scans reasonably well (if not always perfectly): "Climbing / up Grandpa / like a / mountaineer / Grabbing / at those glasses / he likes to wear… ‘Whoa, / Baby, whoa! / You sure like doing that / but without my glasses / I'm blind as a bat.' " Humor is transmitted through the images as visually challenged Grandpa addresses the dog, while Baby sports the senior's spectacles. The rhythm is supported through the use of a larger and darker type for accented beats. Words wobble, and letters are formed unevenly, mirroring the endless motion of the protagonist. Readers will be delighted to hear a new response when Baby takes his first steps. As in Helen Oxenbury's world, this home offers a stimulating environment where an endearing explorer employs his senses to learn and grow. (Picture book. 1-3)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599907420
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 2/28/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 467,503
  • Age range: 3 months - 3 years
  • Product dimensions: 10.90 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Grace Nichols was born in Georgetown, Guyana, where she worked as a teacher and journalist before moving to the UK in 1977. Grace was the first poet in residence at the Tate Gallery, and she has won a number of book awards.

Eleanor Taylor is the creator of Beep, Beep, Let's Go, as well as the artist of No Trouble At All, written by Sally Grindley.

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