BN.com Gift Guide

Whole Child: Developmental Education for the Early Years / Edition 7

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 97%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $50.00   
  • Used (20) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

The seventh edition of The Whole Child gives readers the specific skills they need to function effectively with the children in their care. The t4ext focuses on the whole child and the five developmental selves—emotional, creative, physical, social, and cognitive.

The seventh edition:

  • Incorporates groundbreaking information about brain development and its implication for early childhood education.
  • Includes information about the philosophy of Reggio Emilia.
  • Adds new information on asthma and obesity.
  • Extends coverage of Piaget and Vygotsky.
  • Compares the emergent and conventional approaches to instruction.
  • Features a text-specific companion website.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130226068
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
  • Publication date: 6/5/2000
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 611
  • Product dimensions: 7.76 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Joanne Hendrick is professor emerita of early childhood education from the University of Oklahoma. In addition to raising four children of her own, her practical experience includes working with children at the Stanford Speech and Hearing Clinic, directing a parent-child workshop, working in Head Start, and chairing the early childhood areas at Santa Barbara City College and the University of Oklahoma. She holds an undergraduate degree from Stanford University in disorders of speech and hearing and graduate degrees from the University of California in counseling and early childhood education. She is past president of the California Association for the Education of Young Children.

Her current interests include gardening, photography, traveling to exotic places, writing about young children, and enjoying her ten grandchildren.

Dr. Patricia Weissman is co-author with Joanne Hendrick of two renowned early childhood college textbooks: The Whole Child: Developmental Education for the First Early Years (Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2006) and Total Learning: Developmental Curriculum for the Young Child (Merrill/Prentice Hall, 2007). She began her early childhood career as a family care provider for two infants. Having found her calling, she studied early childhood education in the master’s program at San Francisco State University and received a doctorate of education from the University of San Francisco. During the past 30 years, she has worked as an infant caregiver, preprimary teacher, children’s center director, Child Development Associate (CDA) advisor, professor of early childhood education, and a research associate in early childhood development at the Merrill-Palmer Institute of Wayne State University. She was the founding editor of the journal Innovations in Early Education: The International Reggio Exchange. Dr. Weissman also designed and consulted on the production of the Public Broadcasting Service video series entitled The Whole Child: A Caregiver’s Guide to the First Five Years. Dr. Weissman is the mother of two adult children whom she feels turned out "quite well."

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

Overview

The Whole Child is a practical methods book that explains how to teach young children in ways that foster healthy development. It shifts the attention of the teacher away from "art" or "science" to what the child is and what he needs from the learning environment in order to thrive. For that reason, it focuses on the child and pictures him as composed of a number of selves: the physical self, the emotional self, the social self, the creative self, and the cognitive self.

The physical self includes not only large and fine muscle development but also the handling of routines because such things as eating, resting, and toileting contribute much to physical comfort and well-being. For the emotional self, the book considers ways to increase and sustain mental health, to cope with crises, to use discipline to foster self-control, to cope with aggression, and to foster self-esteem. Included for the social self are ways to build social concern and kindliness and learning to value the cultures of other people. The creative self covers the areas of self-expression through the use of art materials and creativity as expressed in play and applied in thought. Finally, the cognitive, or intellectual, self is considered in terms of language and literacy development; the development of reasoning and thinking skills via the emergent approach, and the development of specific reasoning abilities.

The Whole Child is based on the premises that physical and emotional health are fundamental to the well-being of children, that education must be developmentally appropriate if that well-being is to prosper, andthat children need time to be children—time to be themselves, to do nothing, to stand and watch, to repeat again what they did before—in short, they need time to live in their childhood rather than through it. If we offer the young children we teach rich and appropriate learning opportunities combined with enough time for them to enjoy and experience those opportunities to the fullest, we will enhance childhood, not violate it.

Inviting Features of This Textbook

New to This Edition

  • New information on the development of the brain and the implications of those findings for early childhood education is included in relevant chapters.


  • Additional new material is as diverse as discussions of asthma, obesity, and universal precautions and revised charts on the development of block play and Reggio-inspired examples of emergent curriculum.


  • The basic tenets of Vygotsky's and Piaget's theories are explained, as well as their implications for early childhood education.


  • The chapters on cognition have been reformulated to provide an even greater emphasis on the development of reasoning and thinking skills via the emergent approach.


  • Annotated references have been completely revised and updated, including a new feature, "Pick of the Litter," that identifies especially interesting and perhaps offbeat references.


  • The Whole Child is coordinated with the popular television series based on The Whole Child, funded by the Annenberg CPB Project. This series, available in Spanish and English, was produced under the guidance of an Advisory Committee that included Lilian Katz, Joan Costley, Irving Siegel, Carol Phillips, Ruby Burgess, Eli and Rosaline Saltz, Barbara Ferguson-Kamara, Frederick Goodman, and Jane Squires.

Continuing Features

  • Material is presented in a warm, practical approach based on more than 30 years of experience teaching adult students and young children.
  • Emphasis is on teaching methods that focus on children and their developmental needs rather than on science or art per se.
  • The author, who recently edited First Steps Toward Teaching the Reggio Way, includes explanations of the Reggio Emilia approach and suggestions for integrating aspects of that philosophy.
  • Entire chapters are included on multicultural, nonsexist education (Chapter 13) and welcoming children who may have special educational requirements into the life of the school (Chapter 9).
  • An expanded Instructor's Manual is available at no charge to instructors which includes transparency masters describing "predicaments" for class discussion, suggested assignments, and a variety of test questions.

Acknowledgments

I owe so much to so many people that it is a well-nigh impossible task to mention them all. The contributions of students and parents to my knowledge and point of view have been considerable, as have the contributions of the members of my staff. In addition, I am forever in the debt of my mother, Alma Berg Green, who not only began some of the first parent education classes in Los Angeles but also taught me a great deal about young children and their families.

I am also indebted to Sarah Foot and her wonderful Starr King Parent/Child Workshop, which convinced me that my future lay in early childhood education, and to my own children, who bore with me with such goodwill while I was learning the real truth about bringing up young people.

The seventh edition has moved with the times and includes much new material. For their many suggestions in this regard, I would like to thank Susan Gomez, California State University at Sacramento; Peggy O. Jessee, University of Alabama; Janie H. Humphries, Louisiana Tech University; Mary Virginia Peaslee, Florida Southern College; Pauline Davey Zeece, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

As far as the book itself is concerned, I would like to thank Murray Thomas for teaching me, among other things, how to write and John Wilson for convincing me that some things remained to be said and changed in early education. To Chester and Peggy Harris, I am forever indebted for a certain realistic attitude toward research, particularly in the area of cognitive development.

The people at Merrill/Prentice Hall have, as always, been of great assistance. In particular I want to thank Ann Davis and Pat Grogg for their encouragement. The contributions of Linda Poderski, freelance copy editor; and Sheryl Langner, production editor, also deserve grateful notice. Without their careful help, the book would not exist.

Nor would my photographs be nearly as attractive without the advice and services provided by Color Chrome Photographic Laboratories. Along this same line I am indebted to the staff and children from several centers for making their schools and lives available for me to portray. These schools are The Children's Place at Integris Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City; The Institute of Child Development, University of Oklahoma; The Oaks Parent/Child Workshop, San Marcos Parent/Child Workshop, Starr/King Parent/Child Workshop and Discoveries (all of Santa Barbara, California); and East Tinker Air Force Base Child Development Center, Midwest City, Oklahoma.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.)

I. BEGINNING TO TEACH.

1. How to Survive While Teaching: Suggestions and Guidelines for the First Few Weeks.
Some Thoughts about Getting Started. Implications for the Profession: What Do These Facts Have to Do with Me? Research Study: Who Is Caring for America's Young Children. Some Comforting Thoughts. Basic Professional Ethics. Some Recommendations for Starting Out. Practical Things to Do to Increase Competence. Recognize Stress and Deal with It as Effectively as Possible. Some Special Problems. The Way to Your Mentor's Heart. Summary.

2. What Makes a Good Day for Children?
Can Early Education Make a Difference? Do Different Educational Approaches Produce Different Results? Underlying Philosophy of This Book. Basic Premises of This Book. Putting Premises into Practice: Planning a Good Day for Children. Putting the Elements Together. Summary.

3. What Parents Need.
Problems That Interfere with Good Communication. Suggestions for Establishing a Good Relationship between Parent and Teacher. What If the Relationship Is Not Good? Maintaining Good Relationships: Keeping the Lines of Communication Open. Counseling with Parents. Research Study: Which Kinds of Children's Centers Are Likely to Do the Best Job Communicating with Parents? Practical Pointers about Conducting a Parent Conference. Limits to Guidance Work. Summary.

II. FOSTERINGPHYSICAL WELL-BEING.

4. Handling Daily Routines.
Schedules and Transitions into Routines. Research Study: Intentions Versus Reality. Routines of Arrival and Departure. Routines That Center around Eating. The Process of Toileting. Handling Nap Times. Summary.

5. Development of the Physical Self.
Promotion of Health and Safety in the Children's Center. Basic Principles of Physical Development. Fostering Large Muscle Development in Young Children. Research Study: Can a Little Instruction Make a Big Difference? Use of Perceptual-Motor Activities to Enhance Physical Development. Fostering Sensory Experience. Summary.

III. NOURISHING AND MAINTAINING EMOTIONAL HEALTH.

6. Fostering Mental Health in Young Children.
Importance of Developing Basic Attitudes of Trust, Autonomy, and Initiative in Young Children. Hallmarks of an Emotionally Healthy Young Child. Personal Qualities That Will Help the Teacher Establish an Emotionally Positive Climate in the Children's Center. Practical Ways to Help Young Children Achieve Healthy Emotional Development. Summary.

7. Developing Self-Esteem in Young Children.
Relationship of Self-Esteem to Self-Concept. Research Study: Is Positive Self-Esteem Related to Positive Social Behavior Toward Other People? Sources of Self-Esteem. Common School Practices Likely to Reduce Self-Esteem: Self-Esteem is Like a Balloon. Positive Methods of Enhancing Self-Esteem. Helping the Child Achieve Competence. Summary.

8. Tender Topics: Helping Children Master Emotional Crises.
What Constitutes a Crisis? Some General Principles for Helping Families Deal with Crises. Some General Principles for Helping the Child Deal with Crises. Helping Children Cope with Specific Crises. Research Study: Would You Do It? Summary.

9. Welcoming Children Who Have Special Educational Requirements into the Life of the School.
Identifying Children Who Have Special Needs and Finding Help for Them: The Preschool Teacher as a Screening Agent. Including Children Who Have Disabilities. Learning to Work as a Member of the Team. Getting Started with a Child Who Has a Disability. General Recommendations for Working with Children Who Have Disabilities. Research Study: Do Preschool Children Recognize Disabilities in their Peers? Identifying and Helping Children Who Have Physical Handicaps. Identifying and Helping Children Who Have Emotional Difficulties. Identifying and Helping Children Who Have Delayed or Advanced Mental Ability. Summary.

IV. FOSTERING SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT.

10. Developing Social Competence in Young Children.
Developmental Trends in Social Growth. Research Study: Learning the Secret Passwords for Group Inclusion. Helping Children Become Socially Competent: Suggestions for Teaching Appropriate Social Skills. Summary.

11. Helping Young Children Establish Self-Discipline and Self-Control: But What if She Won't Do What I Say?
Two Basic Goals of Discipline. Establishing Inner Controls: Ego Strength and Moral Development. Practical Things to Do to Make It Easier for Children to Behave in Acceptable Ways. Research Study: Who's to Blame? Teachers' Reactions to Children's Misbehavior. Summary.

12. Aggression: What to Do about It?
Undesirable Ways to Cope with Aggression. Desirable Ways to Cope with Aggression. Research Study: What Kinds of Things Make Young Children Angry, and What Do They Do in Response? Summary.

13. Providing Cross-Cultural, Nonsexist Education.
Examples of Teacher Prejudice. Can Such Attitudes Be Changed? Suggestions for Controlling and Overcoming the Expression of Prejudice. Is Preschool Too Soon to Begin Cross-Cultural, Nonsexist Education? What Do Cross-Cultural and Nonsexist Education Have in Common? Principles of Cross-Cultural Education. Emphasizing the Similarities as Well as Valuing the Uniqueness of People. Can Teaching about Cultural Uniqueness and Similarity of Needs Be Combined? Encouraging Equity by Providing a Nonsexist Education and Helping Children Value Their Own Sexuality. Research Study: The Changing World of Picture Books. Summary.

V. ENHANCING CREATIVITY.

14. Fostering Creativity by Means of Self-Expressive Materials.
Definition of Creativity. Importance of Creativity. Stages of Development. General Recommendations about Creativity. Use of Self-Expressive Materials to Foster the Creative Self. Practical Ways to Encourage the Creative Aspect of Self-Expressive Materials. Presentation of Specific Materials. Summary.

15. Fostering Creativity in Play.
Purposes of Play. Research Study: Games Babies Play. Developmental Stages of Play. Factors Likely to Facilitate Creative Play. Some Practical Ways to Stimulate and Extend Play. Specific Activities to Encourage Creativity in Play. Summary.

VI. DEVELOPING LANGUAGE SKILLS.

16. Fostering the Development of Language Skills.
How Language Is Acquired. Developmental Milestones. Basic Ways to Foster Language Development. Language and Dialectical Differences. Research Study: Does Learning a Second Language Mean Losing the First One? Children Who Have Special Disabilities Related to Speech and Hearing. Summary.

17. Fostering the Emergence of Literacy.
Does Fostering Literacy Mean Teaching Reading? Some Fundamental Principles to Keep in Mind. Research Study: Promoting Literacy in a Developmentally Appropriate Way. Even Very Young Children Can and Should Be Involved in Producing the Written Word. Suggestions for Presenting a Language-Rich Group Time Experience. Using the Computer as a Method of Preschool Instruction. Summary.

VII. FOSTERING COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT.

18. Developing Thinking and Reasoning Skills: Using the Emergent Approach to Foster Creativity in Thought.
New Knowledge about Brain Development Supports the Vital Role Early Childhood Experiences Play in Fostering Its Growth. Selecting Values and Priorities in the Cognitive Realm. What Are the Most Valuable Priorities? Putting These Basic Principles into Practice: Two Approaches to Learning. Implementing the Emergent Curriculum. Some Basic Concepts of Vygotskian Psychology. Getting Started with Emergent Curriculum. Research Study: Going Down the Road to Learning—Which Path Is Best to Take? Some Basic Principles to Remember When Using the Emergent Approach. An Example of How American Teachers Collaborated with the Children to Develop an Emergent Pathway Using the School's Ducklings for Inspiration. Summary.

19. Developing Thinking and Reasoning Skills: Using the Conventional Approach to Build Midlevel Mental Abilities.
Basic Concepts of Piagetian Psychology. How to Provide Opportunities for Practicing Concept Formation Skills. Some Practical Suggestions about Presenting Midlevel Thinking and Reasoning Skills in the Curriculum. An Example of How Midlevel Mental Ability Skills Can Be Included as Part of an Emergent Approach. Summary.

Appendix A. Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment.
Appendix B. Summary of Communicable Diseases.
Appendix C. Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule.
Appendix D. Chart of Normal Development.
Appendix E. 10 Quick Ways to Analyze Children's Books for Racism and Sexism.
Appendix F. A Beginning List of Free and Recyclable Materials.
Appendix G. Activities to Develop Auditory Discrimination.
Appendix H. Educational Organizations, Newsletters, and Journals Associated with Early Childhood.
References.
Acknowledgements for Chapter-Opening Quotations.
Index.
Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

Overview

The Whole Child is a practical methods book that explains how to teach young children in ways that foster healthy development. It shifts the attention of the teacher away from "art" or "science" to what the child is and what he needs from the learning environment in order to thrive. For that reason, it focuses on the child and pictures him as composed of a number of selves: the physical self, the emotional self, the social self, the creative self, and the cognitive self.

The physical self includes not only large and fine muscle development but also the handling of routines because such things as eating, resting, and toileting contribute much to physical comfort and well-being. For the emotional self, the book considers ways to increase and sustain mental health, to cope with crises, to use discipline to foster self-control, to cope with aggression, and to foster self-esteem. Included for the social self are ways to build social concern and kindliness and learning to value the cultures of other people. The creative self covers the areas of self-expression through the use of art materials and creativity as expressed in play and applied in thought. Finally, the cognitive, or intellectual, self is considered in terms of language and literacy development; the development of reasoning and thinking skills via the emergent approach, and the development of specific reasoning abilities.

The Whole Child is based on the premises that physical and emotional health are fundamental to the well-being of children, that education must be developmentally appropriate if that well-being is to prosper, and that childrenneed time to be children—time to be themselves, to do nothing, to stand and watch, to repeat again what they did before—in short, they need time to live in their childhood rather than through it. If we offer the young children we teach rich and appropriate learning opportunities combined with enough time for them to enjoy and experience those opportunities to the fullest, we will enhance childhood, not violate it.

Inviting Features of This Textbook

New to This Edition

  • New information on the development of the brain and the implications of those findings for early childhood education is included in relevant chapters.


  • Additional new material is as diverse as discussions of asthma, obesity, and universal precautions and revised charts on the development of block play and Reggio-inspired examples of emergent curriculum.


  • The basic tenets of Vygotsky's and Piaget's theories are explained, as well as their implications for early childhood education.


  • The chapters on cognition have been reformulated to provide an even greater emphasis on the development of reasoning and thinking skills via the emergent approach.


  • Annotated references have been completely revised and updated, including a new feature, "Pick of the Litter," that identifies especially interesting and perhaps offbeat references.


  • The Whole Child is coordinated with the popular television series based on The Whole Child, funded by the Annenberg CPB Project. This series, available in Spanish and English, was produced under the guidance of an Advisory Committee that included Lilian Katz, Joan Costley, Irving Siegel, Carol Phillips, Ruby Burgess, Eli and Rosaline Saltz, Barbara Ferguson-Kamara, Frederick Goodman, and Jane Squires.

Continuing Features

  • Material is presented in a warm, practical approach based on more than 30 years of experience teaching adult students and young children.
  • Emphasis is on teaching methods that focus on children and their developmental needs rather than on science or art per se.
  • The author, who recently edited First Steps Toward Teaching the Reggio Way, includes explanations of the Reggio Emilia approach and suggestions for integrating aspects of that philosophy.
  • Entire chapters are included on multicultural, nonsexist education (Chapter 13) and welcoming children who may have special educational requirements into the life of the school (Chapter 9).
  • An expanded Instructor's Manual is available at no charge to instructors which includes transparency masters describing "predicaments" for class discussion, suggested assignments, and a variety of test questions.

Acknowledgments

I owe so much to so many people that it is a well-nigh impossible task to mention them all. The contributions of students and parents to my knowledge and point of view have been considerable, as have the contributions of the members of my staff. In addition, I am forever in the debt of my mother, Alma Berg Green, who not only began some of the first parent education classes in Los Angeles but also taught me a great deal about young children and their families.

I am also indebted to Sarah Foot and her wonderful Starr King Parent/Child Workshop, which convinced me that my future lay in early childhood education, and to my own children, who bore with me with such goodwill while I was learning the real truth about bringing up young people.

The seventh edition has moved with the times and includes much new material. For their many suggestions in this regard, I would like to thank Susan Gomez, California State University at Sacramento; Peggy O. Jessee, University of Alabama; Janie H. Humphries, Louisiana Tech University; Mary Virginia Peaslee, Florida Southern College; Pauline Davey Zeece, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

As far as the book itself is concerned, I would like to thank Murray Thomas for teaching me, among other things, how to write and John Wilson for convincing me that some things remained to be said and changed in early education. To Chester and Peggy Harris, I am forever indebted for a certain realistic attitude toward research, particularly in the area of cognitive development.

The people at Merrill/Prentice Hall have, as always, been of great assistance. In particular I want to thank Ann Davis and Pat Grogg for their encouragement. The contributions of Linda Poderski, freelance copy editor; and Sheryl Langner, production editor, also deserve grateful notice. Without their careful help, the book would not exist.

Nor would my photographs be nearly as attractive without the advice and services provided by Color Chrome Photographic Laboratories. Along this same line I am indebted to the staff and children from several centers for making their schools and lives available for me to portray. These schools are The Children's Place at Integris Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City; The Institute of Child Development, University of Oklahoma; The Oaks Parent/Child Workshop, San Marcos Parent/Child Workshop, Starr/King Parent/Child Workshop and Discoveries (all of Santa Barbara, California); and East Tinker Air Force Base Child Development Center, Midwest City, Oklahoma.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2001

    Excellent for Early Educator

    Don't be mislead by its text book format, this book is excellent not only for the educator but the parent to be. I found it to be well written and very informing

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)