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Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand: 200 Delicious, Healthful, Simple Recipes

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Overview

"Possibly the best such bread book on the market . . . every recipe a winner."-New York Times

This accessible book gives new and experienced bakers the freedom and flexibility they need to make excellent homemade loaves, with more than 190 recipes that range from a simple Sourdough Bread to a fancy Finnish Cardamom Coffee Braid. Celebrated as a "reliable and inventive recipe writer" by Publishers Weekly, Beatrice Ojakangas shares four ways to make each delicious whole-grain recipe step by step: by hand, mixer, ...

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Overview

"Possibly the best such bread book on the market . . . every recipe a winner."-New York Times

This accessible book gives new and experienced bakers the freedom and flexibility they need to make excellent homemade loaves, with more than 190 recipes that range from a simple Sourdough Bread to a fancy Finnish Cardamom Coffee Braid. Celebrated as a "reliable and inventive recipe writer" by Publishers Weekly, Beatrice Ojakangas shares four ways to make each delicious whole-grain recipe step by step: by hand, mixer, food processor, and bread machine.

Beatrice Ojakangas (Duluth, MN) is a well-known food writer, author, and consultant whose articles have appeared in Gourmet, Bon Appetit, Redbook, and other magazines. Her many books include the James Beard Award—winning Light and Easy Baking. She has been a guest on radio and television, including CNN, Martha Stewart Living, and Baking with Julia.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764538254
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 1/5/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 428,978
  • Product dimensions: 7.25 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

One: Basic Breads.

Two: Multigrain Breads.

Three: Whole Grain Breads with Fruits and Nuts.

Four: Breads with Whole Grains and Vegetables.

Five: Whole Grain Breads with Herbs, Spices, and Seeds.

Six: Sourdough Bread and Sourdough Starters.

Seven: Breads Made with Sponges.

Eight: Holiday and Coffee Breads.

Nine: Nonwheat Breads.

Mail-Order Sources.

Index.

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First Chapter

Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand

200 Delicious, Healthful, Simple Recipes
By Beatrice Ojakangas

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-3825-X


Chapter One

WHOLE GRAIN BREADS WITH HERBS, SPICES, AND SEEDS

In European and Scandinavian traditions, whole grain breads are made festive by the addition of seeds and spices. Fennel seed in a buttermilk rye, caraway in a molasses rye bread, cinnamon in whole wheat bread, and chili peppers in a cornmeal bread are all based on very natural flavor affinities. Poppy, sesame, and sunflower seeds not only add mild flavor but also are visually attractive and make handsome toppings for breads.

The breads themselves are delicious and basic. The addition of seeds and spices simply embellishes what already is very good. I like to turn to the breads in this chapter when I want an attractive, yet delicious loaf go to with a buffet meal or a soup supper. Bread on a board with a sharp serrated knife, so guests can cut their own slices, next to a hunk of some good cheese is often the appetizer course as people gather at our house. Here are many wonderful breads for you to choose from.

BUTTERMILK - FENNEL SEED RYE

* * *

The licorice flavor of fennel is pleasant in this Scandinavian-style rye bread.

Sampler Loaf Regular Loaf Large Loaf

2/3 cup buttermilk 1 cup buttermilk 1 1/3 cups buttermilk 1 teaspoon packed brown sugar 2 teaspoons packed brown sugar 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar 2 teaspoons butter 1tablespoon butter 1 1/2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon fennel seeds 2 teaspoon fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fennel seeds 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup dark rye flour 1/2 cup dark rye flour 1 cup dark rye flour 1 3/4 cups bread flour 2 1/2 cups bread flour 3 cups bread flour 1 teaspoon rapid-rising or active 1 1/2 teaspoon rapid-rising or 2 teaspoons rapid-rising or active dry yeast active dry yeast dry yeast

TO MIX THE DOUGH BY HAND Heat the buttermilk, brown sugar, and butter, until the butter melts; cool until warm, between 105° and 115°F. Pour the mixture into a large, warmed bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Stir in the fennel seeds, salt, and rye flour. Beat well. Slowly add half of the bread flour and beat until a smooth dough forms. Cover, and let stand 15 minutes. Turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured board, and knead, adding the remaining flour as necessary, until smooth and springy, about 5 minutes. Wash the bowl and grease it; place the dough back in the bowl, and turn it over to grease the top. Cover, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH WITH A HEAVY-DUTY MIXER Heat the buttermilk, brown sugar, and butter, until the butter melts; cool until warm, between 105° and 115°F. Pour the mixture into the warmed mixing bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Add the fennel seeds, salt, and rye flour. Beat well. Slowly add half of the bread flour and beat until a smooth dough forms. Cover, and let stand 15 minutes. Knead the dough in the mixer with the dough hook, on medium to high speed, adding the remaining flour as necessary, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and is smooth and springy but still soft to the touch. Remove the dough hook, cover the bowl, and let the dough rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH IN THE FOOD PROCESSOR Place the plastic dough blade into the work bowl. Heat the buttermilk, brown sugar, and butter, until the butter melts; cool until very warm, between 120° and 130°F; set aside. Place the remaining ingredients into the work bowl. Turn the processor on, and slowly pour the buttermilk mixture through the feed tube, processing until the dough is smooth and pulls away from the sides of the bowl. If the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time, and process until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. Cover the work bowl, and let the dough rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Or remove the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH IN THE BREAD MACHINE Pour the buttermilk (at room temperature) into the pan. Add the remaining ingredients, in the order listed. Make an indentation in the dry ingredients and add the yeast. Select Dough, and press Start. If the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 teaspoon of water at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. The machine will stop when the dough is ready to shape and bake.

TO MIX AND BAKE THE BREAD IN THE BREAD MACHINE Pour the buttermilk (at room temperature) into the pan. Add the remaining ingredients, in the order listed. Make an indentation in the dry ingredients and add the yeast. Select the Basic cycle, set the crust on Medium, and press Start. During the mixing cycle, if the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 teaspoon of water at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch.

TO SHAPE AND BAKE IN THE OVEN Lightly grease a baking sheet. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board or lightly oiled surface. Punch the dough down, and shape it into a round loaf. Place the loaf, with the smooth side up, onto the baking sheet. Cover and let rise in a warm place until almost doubled, 45 to 60 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Bake 35 to 40 minutes, until the loaf is golden and a wooden skewer inserted into the loaf comes out clean and dry. Brush the top of the loaf while it's still hot with melted butter, if desired. Remove from the pan and cool on a wire rack.

CARAWAY RYE BREAD

* * *

Rye flour itself doesn't darken a bread very much, so most bakeries add black bread coloring made from burned sugar. I rather like the paleness of the crumb and the mild molasses and caraway flavor of this loaf. Although the bread is great for sandwiches, I usually go for just a slathering of butter.

Sampler Loaf Regular Loaf Large Loaf

2/3 cup water 1 cup water 1 1/3 cups water 1 tablespoon dark molasses 2 tablespoons dark molasses 3 tablespoons dark molasses 2 teaspoons butter 1 tablespoon butter 1 1/2 tablespoons butter 3/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon caraway seeds 2 teaspoons caraway seeds 1 tablespoon caraway seeds 1/2 cup pumpernickel rye flour 3/4 cup pumpernickel rye flour 1 cup pumpernickel rye flour 1 1/2 cups bread flour 2 1/4 cups bread flour 3 cups bread flour 1 teaspoon rapid-rising or active 1 1/2 teaspoons rapid-rising or 2 teaspoons rapid-rising or active dry yeast active dry yeast dry yeast

TO MIX THE DOUGH BY HAND Heat the water until warm, between 105° and 115°F; pour it into a large, warmed bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Stir in the molasses, butter, salt, caraway seed, and rye flour. Beat well. Cover, and let stand 15 minutes. Slowly add the bread flour, and beat until a smooth dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured board, and knead, adding flour if necessary, until smooth and springy, about 5 minutes. Wash the bowl and grease it; place the dough back in the bowl, and turn it over to grease the top. Cover, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH WITH A HEAVY-DUTY MIXER Heat the water until warm, between 105° and 115°F; pour it into the warmed mixing bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Add the molasses, butter, salt, caraway seeds, and rye flour. Beat well. Cover, and let stand 15 minutes. Slowly add the bread flour, and beat until a smooth dough forms. Knead the dough in the mixer with the dough hook, on medium to high speed, adding flour as necessary, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and is smooth and springy but still soft to the touch. Remove the dough hook, cover the bowl, and let the dough rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH IN THE FOOD PROCESSOR Place the plastic dough blade into the work bowl. Heat the water until very warm, between 120° and 130°F; set aside. Place the remaining ingredients into the work bowl. Turn the processor on, and slowly pour the water through the feed tube, processing until the dough is smooth and pulls away from the sides of the bowl. If the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time, and process until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. Cover the work bowl, and let the dough rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Or remove the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH IN THE BREAD MACHINE Pour the water (at room temperature) into the pan. Add the remaining ingredients, in the order listed. Make an indentation in the dry ingredients and add the yeast. Select Dough, and press Start. If the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 teaspoon of water at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. The machine will stop when the dough is ready to shape and bake.

TO MIX AND BAKE THE BREAD IN THE BREAD MACHINE Pour the water (at room temperature) into the pan. Add the remaining ingredients, in the order listed. Make an indentation in the dry ingredients and add the yeast. Select the Basic or Whole Wheat cycle, set the crust on Medium, and press Start. During the mixing cycle, if the dough is wet and sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch. If the dough is not soft to the touch but is very firm, add 1 teaspoon of water at a time, until the dough is smooth yet soft to the touch.

TO SHAPE AND BAKE IN THE OVEN Lightly grease an 8- or 9-inch round cake pan or baking sheet. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board or lightly oiled surface. Punch the dough down, and shape it into a round loaf. Place the loaf, with the smooth side up, into the pan. Cover and let rise in a warm place until almost doubled, 45 to 60 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Bake 35 to 40 minutes, until the loaf is golden and a wooden skewer inserted into the loaf comes out clean and dry. Brush the top of the loaf while it's still hot with melted butter, if desired. Remove from the pan and cool on a wire rack.

CHILI MASA CHEDDAR CHEESE BREAD

* * *

Masa harina is a finely ground cornmeal, treated with lime, from which corn tortillas are made. It is widely available in the baking or Mexican foods sections of most markets and whole foods stores. This is a pale, almost white bread with the aroma of cornmeal, a bite of chili flakes, the crunch of toasted pepitas, and the richness of cheese. When mixing this dough in the bread machine, it may seem to be very dry and crumbly at first because the masa really sucks up the liquid; however, after the machine has mixed the dough for a few minutes, it softens. If the dough is still dry, add water according to the directions. When you bake this bread in the bread machine, the character of it changes. The cheese gets mixed into the dough so that it is not distinguishable.

Sampler Loaf Regular Loaf Large Loaf

2/3 cup water 1 cup water 1 1/3 cups water 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice lemon juice lemon juice 1 tablespoon corn oil 2 tablespoons corn oil 3 tablespoons corn oil 3/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar 2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 1/2 teaspoons red pepper flakes 1/2 cup masa harina 3/4 cup masa harina 1 cup masa harina 1 1/2 cups bread flour 2 1/4 cups bread flour 3 cups bread flour 1 teaspoon rapid-rising or active 1 1/2 teaspoons rapid-rising or 2 teaspoons rapid-rising or active dry yeast active dry yeast dry yeast 1/3 cup toasted pepitas 1/2 cup toasted pepitas 3/4 cup toasted pepitas 1/4 cup diced sharp 1/3 cup diced sharp 1/2 cup diced sharp Cheddar cheese Cheddar cheese Cheddar cheese

GLAZE FOR BREAD BAKED CONVENTIONALLY

1 egg 1 tablespoon water

TO MIX THE DOUGH BY HAND Heat the water until warm, between 105° and 115°F; pour it into a large, warmed bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Stir in the lemon juice, oil, salt, sugar, pepper flakes, and masa harina. Beat well. Cover, and let stand 15 minutes. Slowly add the bread flour, and beat until a smooth dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured board, and knead, adding flour if necessary, until smooth and springy, about 5 minutes. Knead in the pepitas and cheese. Wash the bowl and grease it; place the dough back in the bowl, and turn it over to grease the top. Cover, and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.

TO MIX THE DOUGH WITH A HEAVY-DUTY MIXER Heat the water until warm, between 105° and 115°F; pour it into the warmed mixing bowl, and add the yeast. Let stand 5 minutes, until the yeast begins to bubble. Add the lemon juice, oil, salt, sugar, pepper flakes, and masa marina. Beat well.

Continues...


Excerpted from Whole Grain Breads by Machine or Hand by Beatrice Ojakangas Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 31, 2009

    Learning About Life Across the Atlantic

    These are good whole grain recipes. The major drawback of the book is that it is written in British English and you need to constantly refer to the glossary to remember what the American term is for the British ingredient specified. I would also have liked some sweet breads and some savory ones redolent with herbs. There's little of that here. But it is the bread book I use most often as most of the bread I make is whole grain.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2001

    The Best Breadbook

    I think this is the best breadbook you could ever buy. Every recipe I've tried has been great! When I bought this book I didn't know a thing about bread baking. This book has a lot of info that would make anyone a good bread baker. Plus you'll never outgrow it with 200 recipes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2001

    Delicious, healthy wonderful bread

    This is an excellent book for many reasons. Among them are- she gives all methods-bread machine, heavy-duty mixer, processor, and by hand. No other bread book I have seen does that. Ms. Ojakangas also includes good recipes for dishes to serve with these breads, (like some good soups), and she also includes recipes to use up extra bread (a very good dried cinnamon toast, for example). One bonus is the last chapter, which includes some very good sounding recipes for gluten-intolerant people. One of the few (maybe only) drawback(s) is that there are few illustrations. To me, this book is well worth the price. It is accessible for new bread bakers, but challenging enough for those of us who have been baking a while.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 17, 2009

    A must have for making bread in a machine.

    Delicious recipes, easy to follow instructions with a wide variety of recipes.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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