A Whole New Ball Game: The Story of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League [NOOK Book]

Overview


"Play ball!" yelled the umpires as the teams of the AAGPBL took the field in the tense, war-torn days of 1943.  Like all professional baseball players, these athletes scrambled to their positions, tossed balls across diamonds, and filled the air with chatter.  But there was something different about them--they all wore skirts, went to charm school, and continually had to answer one question: "What is a woman doing playing baseball?" What were they doing?  Having a great time, playing ...
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A Whole New Ball Game: The Story of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

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Overview


"Play ball!" yelled the umpires as the teams of the AAGPBL took the field in the tense, war-torn days of 1943.  Like all professional baseball players, these athletes scrambled to their positions, tossed balls across diamonds, and filled the air with chatter.  But there was something different about them--they all wore skirts, went to charm school, and continually had to answer one question: "What is a woman doing playing baseball?" What were they doing?  Having a great time, playing top-notch ball, and showing that a woman's place was at home only when she was at bat, behind the plate, or scoring a run.  For twelve seasons, from 1943 to 1954, some of America's best female athletes earned their livings by playing baseball.  This is their story in their own words, a tale of no-hitters and chaperones, stolen bases and practical jokes, home runs and run-ins with fans. Life in the league, however, was not all fun.  Born out of a wartime "manpower" shortage, the AAGPBL ended with the growth of television and the ideal of the suburban home.  Here, too, is the story of America's changing attitudes toward men and women and the roles we expect each to play.  Author Sue Macy spent eleven years tracking down the women of the AAGPBL, interviewing them, and looking at their scrapbooks.  Along the way she found that their odyssey did not end with the collapse of the league. The same courage and spunk the players displayed on the field led them to get back in touch with each other in the 1980s, to remind the world of what they had achieved, and to take their rightful places in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.  Balancing the voices of the women of the league with a lively, insightful overview of the changing patterns of American life, A Whole New Ball Game is a sports story full of telling insights about who we expect to be at home and how women can get back to first base.

Describes the activities of the members of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, the women's professional baseball league that existed between 1943 and 1954.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Macy offers an excellent introduction to one of the least explored areas of baseball history (recently popularized in the film A League of Their Own ). Established by Chicago Cubs owner and chewing-gum magnate Phil Wrigley in 1943 as an entertainment alternative to the war-depleted major leagues, the AAGPBL lasted until 1954--and until very recently was all but forgotten. Macy has wisely chosen to focus not on the trivia of games past (although the appendix offers enough statistics to satisfy the most rabid baseball addict) but on the social history that produced the league and on the experiences of its players. She writes frankly about such problems as alcoholism and unwanted sexual advances from team officials, fans and sportswriters. The book is particularly astute in its observations on the league as a forum for female bonding, something that few women of the time had at their disposal. Perhaps the most affecting passages concern the reluctance of AAGPBL veterans to discuss their experiences until the rise of the women's movement gave them a renewed sense of self-worth. These tough and funny women emerge as heroic figures worthy of admiration and emulation. Archival photographs add to the book's historical value and its sense of fun. A worthy addition to the library of any baseball fan. Ages 12-up. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
During World War II, the nation followed the athletic feats of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, which played from 1943 to 1954. This fascinating history includes numerous photographs that give a sense of the women's personalities and prowess.
School Library Journal
Gr 5 UpAs much a social history of the postwar era as a chronicle of women in baseball, this lively, informative titlesupported by interesting photos and appendixesis in a league all its own. (May 1993)
Ilene Cooper
Anyone who's seen the movie "A League of Their Own" will be familiar with the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League started by P. K. Wrigley to keep fan attention on baseball when most male ball players were fighting in World War II. The attention garnered by the movie can only help sell Macy's solidly researched book, which not only tells the story of the league, but also celebrates the women who played in it. Using anecdotes and interviews, Macy brings the league to life for today's readers as she captures both the on-field action and the off-field high jinks. Yet, Macy's greatest contribution is placing the league in a historical and sociological context. The league's time frame parallels an era when women's place in society came full circle. Before the war, married women were not even allowed to work in some places, so that heads of households could have what few jobs there were during the Depression. But when the men went to war, women went into the factories--and into baseball. By the 1950s, women were encouraged to get back into the kitchen, and the league eventually folded. Macy also discusses the exclusion of African American women from the league, another consequence of society's prejudices. Despite the league's ignominious end, this book is still a celebration. Through their own efforts and perseverance, the ball players and their league are now remembered in the Baseball Hall of Fame. To be illustrated with black-and-white photographs, including historical memorabilia such as baseball cards.
From the Publisher
"An interesting and informative look at the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League that operated from 1945–1954.... A significant title." —School Library Journal, starred review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466851092
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 8/6/2013
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 207,102
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author


Sue Macy is a lifelong baseball fan and has been a writer and editor for children and young adults for more than fifteen years. A member of Princeton's first women's softball team as an undergraduate, she is now an editorial director in the magazine division of Scholastic Inc.  She lives in Englewood, New Jersey.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2014

    Really good

    This is a really good book for anyone who likes baseball

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2014

    A whowle knew habnfgge

    It was a very inspiring book suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuupppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrtrrtrrrrrrrrrrtrrrrrrrr interesting

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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