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A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future

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Overview

The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: artists, inventors, storytellers-creative and holistic "right-brain" thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't.

Drawing on research from around the world, Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) outlines the six fundamentally human abilities that are absolute essentials for professional success and personal ...

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A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future

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Overview

The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: artists, inventors, storytellers-creative and holistic "right-brain" thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't.

Drawing on research from around the world, Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) outlines the six fundamentally human abilities that are absolute essentials for professional success and personal fulfillment—and reveals how to master them. A Whole New Mind takes readers to a daring new place, and a provocative and necessary new way of thinking about a future that's already here.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

With visionary flare, Pink argues that business and everyday life will soon be dominated by right-brain thinkers. He identifies the roots and implications of transitioning from a society dominated by left-brain thinkers into something entirely different-although at times, he seems to be exhorting rather than observing the trend. As a narrator, Pink delivers in a well executed manner, with occasional hints of enthusiasm. He maintains a steady voice that is well suited for a business-oriented text, and his crisp pronunciation and consistent pace keeps listeners engaged and at ease. Updated with new material. A Riverhead paperback (reviewed online). (Feb.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Soundview Executive Book Summaries

Best-selling author Daniel H. Pink moves us from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age as he defends his argument that the era of "left brain" dominance is giving way to a new world in which "right brain" qualities- inventiveness, meaning, empathy- predominate.

Pink offers a fresh look at what it takes for individuals and organizations to excel. Drawing on cutting-edge research from around the world, he reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend: Design, Story, Symphony, Empathy, Play and Meaning.

Pink also offers several hands-on exercises and examples culled from experts to help readers sharpen the necessary abilities. The impact of what Pink presents can not only change the way we see the world but also how we experience it as well.

The last few decades have belonged to a certain kind of person with a certain kind of mind, Pink explains, like computer programmers who could crank code, lawyers who could craft contracts, and MBAs who could crunch numbers.

But the future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind- creators and empathizers, pattern recognizers, and meaning makers. These people- artists, inventors, designers, storytellers, caregivers, consolers, big-picture thinkers- will now reap society’s richest rewards and share its greatest joys, Pink says.

A change of such magnitude is complex. Ours has been the age of the "knowledge worker," the well-educated manipulator of information and deployer of expertise. But that is changing, Pink explains. Thanks to an array of forces – material abundance that is deepening our nonmaterial yearnings, globalization that is shipping white-collar work overseas, and powerful technologies that are eliminating certain kinds of work altogether- we are entering a new age.

There is something that encapsulates the change and it’s right inside your head, Pink says. Our brains are divided into two hemispheres; the left side is sequential, logical and analytical; the right hemisphere is nonlinear, intuitive and holistic.

Pink explains that we need both "L-Directed Thinking" and "R-Directed Thinking" in order to craft fulfilling lives and build protective, just societies.

In the Conceptual Age, we will need to complement our L-Directed reasoning by mastering six essential R-Directed aptitudes. Together these six high-concept, high-touch senses can help develop the whole new mind this era demands:

  1. Not just function but also DESIGN. Today it’s economically crucial and personally rewarding to create something that is beautiful, whimsical, or emotionally engaging.
  2. Not just argument but also STORY. The essence of persuasion, communication and self-understanding has become the ability also to fashion a compelling narrative.
  3. Not just focus but also SYMPHONY. What’s in greatest demand today isn’t analysis but synthesis- seeing the big picture and, crossing boundaries, being able to combine disparate pieces into an arresting new whole.
  4. Not just logic but also EMPATHY. What will distinguish those who thrive will be their ability to understand what makes their fellow woman and man tick, to forge relationships, and to care for others.
  5. Not just seriousness but also PLAY. Too much sobriety can be bad for your career and worse for your general well being. In the Conceptual Age, we all need to play.
  6. Not just accumulation but also MEANING. A world of material plenty has freed us to pursue more significant desires: purpose, transcendence, and spiritual fulfillment.


The Conceptual Age is dawning, Pink tells us. Those who hope to survive in it must master the high-concept, high-touch abilities. This situation presents both promise and peril. The promise is that Conceptual Age jobs are exceedingly democratic. The peril is that our world moves at a furious pace.

Pink writes,"The first group of people who develop a whole new mind, who master high-concept and high-touch abilities, will do extremely well. The rest – those who move slowly or not at all – may miss out or, worse, suffer. The choice is yours." Copyright © 2006 Soundview Executive Book Summaries


—Soundview Summary\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594481710
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/7/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 31,545
  • Lexile: 1150L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel H. Pink

Daniel H. Pink is the New York Times bestselling author of A Whole New Mind and Free Agent Nation. He lectures to corporations, associations, and universities in the U.S. and abroad on economic transformation and the changing world of work. In 2007, he won a Japan Society Media Fellowship that took him to Tokyo to study the manga industry.

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Table of Contents

A Whole New Mind Introduction

Part One: The Conceptual Age

One. Right Brain Rising
Two. Abundance, Asia, and Automation
Three. High Concept, High Touch

Part Two: The Six Senses

Introducing the Six Senses
Four. Design
Five. Story
Six. Symphony
Seven. Empathy
Eight. Play
Nine. Meaning

Afterword Notes Acknowledgments Index

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 135 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(65)

4 Star

(41)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 135 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Thought-provoking, but ironically, the writing craft is NOT very right brain at all.

    The writer has a great idea but is not an accomplished wordsmith or spinner of tales. In other words, there is no artistry or beauty in the craft. This is ironic, given that Daniel Pink is insisting throughout this book, in very clunky, boring prose, that artistic qualities are what we all need to master in order to survive in business in the 21st Century. The other thing that bothers me about this book is that he feels the only reason to try to be creative is for monetary gain. Financial success, while a worthy goal, is only one goal in life. This is just another one of those western tunnel-vision books about maintaining corporate world domination. Yawn.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Your right mind?

    I purchased this book after I saw part of a PBS program featuring Mr. Pink. He does a fine job of synthesizing years of neurologic and psychologic research by others. There are workbook sections in it which are appropriate for students. The book is thought provoking and may well alert us all to an imminent paradigm shift in society.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A whole new way to see the world

    A Whole New Mind is written for those who are looking for a whole new way to see the world and engage their brain. The book starts with a historical narrative outlining four major "ages":<BR/><BR/>1. Agricultural Age (farmers)<BR/>2. Industrial Age (factory workers)<BR/>3. Information Age (knowledge workers)<BR/>4. Conceptual Age (creators and empathizers)<BR/><BR/>The fourth stage is where Pink focuses on how people and businesses can be successful. Pink references three prevailing trends pointing towards the future of business and the economy: Abundance (consumers have too many choices, nothing is scarce), Asia (everything that can be outsourced, is) and Automation (computerization, robots, technology, processes).<BR/><BR/>This brings up three crucial questions for the success of any business:<BR/><BR/>1. Can a computer do it faster?<BR/>2. Is what I'm offering in demand in an age of abundance?<BR/>3. Can someone overseas do it cheaper?<BR/><BR/>When these questions are present, creativity becomes the competitive difference that can differentiate commodities (and YOU are a commodity, too). Pink outlines six essential senses:<BR/><BR/>1. Design - Moving beyond function to engage the sense.<BR/>2. Story - Narrative added to products and services - not just argument. Best of the six senses.<BR/>3. Symphony - Adding invention and big picture thinking (not just detail focus).<BR/>4. Empathy - Going beyond logic and engaging emotion and intuition.<BR/>5. Play - Bringing humor and light-heartedness to business and products.<BR/>6. Meaning - Immaterial feelings and values of products.<BR/><BR/>Pink makes the argument that we all need to incorporate more empathy and play into our lives because it enables one to relax, enjoy life more and engage the unused capacity of one's intellect. He makes a strong argument that our society pigeon holes us into thinking a certain way and approaching life without the tools we really need to enjoy it and get the most out of it. The book is full of useful tips and strategies in addition to a call to action in your own life.<BR/><BR/>Another great book I read this week that I strongly recommend because it changed how I see myself is The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2006

    Interesting read on right-brain thinking

    This fun, exciting read suggests many ways to develop your 'right-brain' thinking - the kind of relationship-based thought patterns that author Daniel Pink argues will be essential in the emerging 'Conceptual Age.' Pink draws examples from numerous disciplines, industries and locations. The result is thought-provoking and applicable. We recommend this work to individuals and companies committed to change and open to originality its tools will raise your capacities. Pink¿s reasoning about the forces shaping this new age is striking in its simple rigor, as are the questions he offers that let you check how ready you and your business are for the economy that is emerging. His emphasis on the positive is the book¿s one weakness. He doesn¿t really address how trauma or turmoil would affect the driving forces of the Conceptual Age. Also, he only briefly touches upon those aspects of business where right brain thinking is hard to apply. What¿s here is good, but what¿s left out is somewhat troubling.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2006

    Globalization and Outsourcing are Everyone's Reality

    As someone who was in an engineering and IT field, but not of it, I began to feel that there was hope for creatures like me. I understand technology, but my viewpoint tends to be a big picture viewpoint. Writing lines of code left half of me wanting something more and my fellow employees and managers irritated. Pink provides a clue as to the types of jobs that will no longer exist in the United States in the coming decades by asking three questions: Can someone overseas do it cheaper? Can a computer do it faster? Is what I'm offering in demand in an age of abundance? As I watched Information Technology (IT) jobs move overseas and become automated, I fully understood what Pink meant with the first question, but the last one had me stumped until I read further. Then, I grasped that I was already a member of a 'fleet of empathic, meaning-seeking boomers' which had 'already started wading ashore.' I had self-identified as a Cultural Creative a number of years ago. So if American jobs are significantly going to change, how do we prepare for what Pink calls the Conceptual Age? Even if you are planning to retire from your current job in the near future, the likelihood is that you will continue your work life in some form or another. The world is changing and the economy is changing. As boomers enter the last phases of their official working life, what will they bring to the picture? Will corporations understand the value that people with experience bring to the job, or will they pursue the 'cheaper and faster' model of exporting to Asia and hiring young college grads (often immigrants) to replace an aging work force? Thank for you for also recommending the perfect companion book, THE BLACK BOOK OF OUTSOURCING by Brown & Wilson (Wiley Press, 2005) which showed me where the new opportunities are, how to get up to speed on what outsourcing is truly all about from very clear instructions, and an incredible resource directory for me to pursue my job search.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2006

    Right on the mark! A must-read for all Executives

    After attending a seminar with this very charismatic and dynamic author (Dan Pink), I read the book in one sitting. As a corporate executive, I can attest that the concepts and trends noted in this book are relevant and accurate. This is a great read with well organized thoughts and case studies that reinforce a very simple concept. It offers invaluable insights as to the key success-drivers for companies in the 21st century. I have made this a required reading for all of my directors and managers, who are facing a rapidly changing landscape in a traditionally left-brained, engineering and finance company.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2005

    Read this or perish in the new workplace world order

    Perhaps 1 in 10 books I read to the end. This one I read to the end and wished there were another 1,000 pages to go. Daniel Pink clarifies, confirms and supports many things I kinda suspected or felt were the case, but could not articulate. Until now. If you have ever felt that art or empathy or feeling should not always take a back seat to power in the workplace, well, your time has come. They are no longer quaint nice-to-haves; they are essential to the survival of your job, your future and the prosperity of the nation. It's just that everyone hasn't quite woken up to the fact. Pink explains the how's and the why's, and what you need to do to not only survive this tsunami, but to build a better life than you ever thought you could have.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    An excelent book for business professionals or anyone contemplating an educational choice or occupational change. Great book for HS or college grads

    An excelent book for business professionals or anyone contemplating an educational choice or occupational change. A practical application section at the end of each skill chapter gives the reader pleanty of ways to learn more about a subject and/or improve skills. The author uses humor and great examples to keep you interested.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 23, 2009

    A whole new mind.

    As I read through this book, my mind was racing with idea about what is in store for the future. It challenges the reader to think and look at things in a whole new perspective. Right-brain thinking is undoubtedly going to rule the future. It is the type of thinking that allows individuals to be creative and unique.
    This book is a great tool for the upcoming generation, because it tells us how we need to expand, and how that's going to happen. Also, it gives great incite on how to read people's body language. This book covers a vast number of things that will help many people in the future. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in being successful and know you will like it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Time For A Change

    Change is a-comin'. For those people that don't believe it, now would be a good time to leave the cave. And yes, power and control will go to people who possess strong right brain qualities. "R <BR/><BR/>The author gives us a quick trip through the halls of neuroscience which leads into acquiring the skills that will be needed for this new Conceptual Age. I actually preferred the second half of the book as I am not one that needs to be convinced that my environment and certainly the environment of my children and grandchildren will be vastly different from the one my father and grandfather grew up in. <BR/><BR/>Certain ideas and theories in this book could stand a little more research and certainly may be influenced by political leanings. All in all, it is still a very important book and should be part of any manager's survival pack. I hope you find this review helpful. <BR/><BR/>Michael L. Gooch, SPHR

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2013

    Great book

    Provides an interesting point of view on how to encourage creativity.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2013

    Excellent info. I read it in one sitting. I am 70..a mother of

    Excellent info. I read it in one sitting. I am 70..a mother of 8, grandmother of 25, I will re- read it, and send them to all.
    As one reader said read this or perish. Change is a-comin'

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  • Posted March 12, 2013

    Good Book

    This book is interesting, entertaining, and well organized. I'm enjoying reading it chunk at a time to digest the information. Well done.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2013

    Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future We prob

    Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
    We probably all have read how right brain/left brain factors influence our perceptions and expressions. This book goes on to expand these influences onto our societal and economic structures. Daniel Pink presents some very interesting concepts to consider. However, right/left brain influences have been around since humans started using their brains, and Pink uses just the past few decades, and only in our culture to focus his point.
    Historically there have been other eras such as the renaissance that right brain thinking was evident.

    The last part of the book presents the “senses” we will need to develop more of a right brain approach to our thinking, listing resources and exercises to use. This struck me as totally silly fluff.

    So, in conclusion… I found the first half of the book worth while, but it seemed to me to taper off into vague redundancy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Awesome

    One of the coolest books ever

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2012

    Fascinating Read

    I experienced many "aha" moments reading this book. Really made me look at the world in a different way and gave me understanding of the direction we're all headed in. Great information presented in a easy to grasp way. Nice work by Mr. Pink.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    To: Anyone want nook sex

    I do!!! Meet me at dont lie result one

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2012

    Pink

    Pink

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    U r team epic

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    One vote for pink

    (This was a stupid scavenger hunt.)

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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