Who's in a Family?

Who's in a Family?

by Robert Skutch, Laura Nienhaus
     
 

Family is important, but who's in a family? Why, the people who love you the most!This equal opportunity, open-minded picture book has no preconceptions about what makes a family a family. There's even equal time given to some of children's favorite animal families. With warm and inviting jewel-tone illustrations, this is a great book for that long talk with a

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Overview

Family is important, but who's in a family? Why, the people who love you the most!This equal opportunity, open-minded picture book has no preconceptions about what makes a family a family. There's even equal time given to some of children's favorite animal families. With warm and inviting jewel-tone illustrations, this is a great book for that long talk with a little person on your lap.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Beginning with a traditional nuclear family and ending with blank spaces in which the child reader is instructed to ``draw a picture of your family,'' this slight book catalogues multicultural contemporary family units, including those with single parents, lesbian and gay parents, mixed-race couples, grandparents and divorced parents. Kevin and his brother like their kimono-clad grandmother to help them with their jigsaw puzzles, while Ricky lives with two families. ``Aunt Amanda and Uncle Stan,'' pictured riding in a blue convertible with their pets, ``don't have any children at all'' but are ``still a family,'' says the narrator, because ``they say Mouser and Fred are their `babies.'" Because ``animals have families, too,'' the text describes elephant, lion, chimpanzee and dog families as well as human families. (A human family headed by a mother is ``like the chimpanzee family. Mama chimp raises the babies by herself, with the help of any older children she may have.'') Nienhaus's lackluster illustrations, the schoolmarmish tone of the text and the comparisons with wild animals all tend to undercut the final definition of a family as ``the people who love you the most!'' Ages 3-7. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Leila Toledo
Bright vivid illustrations show the combinations of people and animals that come together to form a family. The combinations include single parents, grandparents, female and males partners and married couples without children. Lions, chimpanzees and elephants are among the animal families featured.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Simple declarative statements move readers from one family configuration to the next, from single children to single parents to same-sex couples. Here and there animal families are juxtaposed with the human, presumably to show that certain situations are natural. For instance, one double-page spread shows a grandmother caring for her two grandsons while their mother is at work. The following page explains that the eldest female is also in charge in elephant families. While this may reassure some youngsters, it could also very well produce more questions than answers. Richly colored although somewhat two-dimensional pencil illustrations show loving families of a variety of races and colors in action. A serviceable, albeit surface, title.-Martha Topol, Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, MI

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883672669
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
02/28/1997
Pages:
1
Sales rank:
230,446
Product dimensions:
7.04(w) x 9.85(h) x 0.15(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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