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Who's in Charge?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain

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Overview

There is no "you" consciously making decisions. So how do we make decisions? How can we have free will if we don't pull the levers on our own behavior? What moral and legal implications follow if we don't have free will? Who's in Charge? is a primer for a new era in the understanding of human behavior that ranges across neuroscience, psychology, ethics, and the law with a light touch but profound implications.

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Who's in Charge?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain

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Overview

There is no "you" consciously making decisions. So how do we make decisions? How can we have free will if we don't pull the levers on our own behavior? What moral and legal implications follow if we don't have free will? Who's in Charge? is a primer for a new era in the understanding of human behavior that ranges across neuroscience, psychology, ethics, and the law with a light touch but profound implications.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Alan Alda
“This exciting, stimulating, and sometimes even funny book challenges us to think in new ways about that most mysterious part of us—the part that makes us think we’re us.”
Wall Street Journal
“Gazzaniga is a towering figure in contemporary neurobiology. . . . Who’s in Charge? is a joy to read.”
Salon.com
“Fascinating. . . . Gazzaniga uses a lifetime of experience in neuroscientific research to argue that free will is alive and well.”
Daily Texan
“An utterly captivating and fascinating read that addresses issues of consciousness and free will and, in the end, offers suggestions as to how these ideas may or may not inform legal matters.”
Portland Mercury
“[The] scope of Michael S. Gazzaniga’s Who’s in Charge? is huge—it tackles the age-old debate of free will [and] offers a lot to consider about what Gazzaniga deems the ‘scientific problem of the century.’”
Reason.com
“Fascinating. . . . [An] intriguing and persuasive treatment of the moral implications of modern neuroscience.”
Best Books for the Holidays CNBC.com
“From one of the world’s leading thinkers comes a thought-provoking book on how we think and how we act. . . . An exciting, stimulating, and at times even funny read that helps us further understand ourselves, our actions, and our world.”
Publishers Weekly
Are our actions determined solely by physical processes, or is the mind its own master? This age-old philosophical conundrum gets a terrific, if ultimately indecisive, analysis in this engrossing study of the mechanics of thought. Gazzaniga (Human: The Science Behind What Makes Your Brain Unique), a leading cognitive neuroscientist, draws on cutting-edge research, including his fascinating experiments with “split-brain” patients, to diagram the Rube Goldberg apparatus inside our skulls. Beneath our illusion of an in-control self, he contends, thousands of chaotically interacting neural modules governing motion, senses, and language unconsciously make decisions long before we consciously register them; the closest thing to a self is a brain module called “the interpreter,” which spins a retrospective story line to rationalize whatever the nonconscious brain did. (Brain injuries can make the interpreter tragicomically muddled, leading patients to claim that their hand doesn’t belong to them or that their relatives are imposters.) The author’s reconciliation of that deterministic model with the idea of free will is less successful, requiring “a unique language, which has yet to be developed”; until then, we can only invoke muzzy notions from complexity theory. Though he doesn’t quite capture the ghost, Gazzaniga does give a lucid, stimulating primer on the machine that generates it. B&w illus. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
"A fascinating affirmation of our essential humanity." —-Kirkus
Best Books for the Holidays - CNBC.com
"From one of the world’s leading thinkers comes a thought-provoking book on how we think and how we act. . . . An exciting, stimulating, and at times even funny read that helps us further understand ourselves, our actions, and our world."
Library Journal
Gazzaniga (psychology, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique) takes us inside the workings of the human brain, exploring its known neurological functions and their contributions to the human sense of the conscious self and consequent behaviors. To what degree are we hardwired for behavior? What of genetics? How does human brain function differ from that of other members of the animal world? He highlights amazing research into split-brain cerebral functions and reveals a brain that can be localized and simultaneously diffuse in function. So do biological processes determine our behavior, trumping free will and letting us off the hook for our actions? Gazzaniga argues convincingly that they do not—that the influence of human social interaction on behavior disproves this deterministic theory. We are free agents, capable of overriding impulses, making conscious decisions, and regulating our behavior accordingly within social and ethical constructs. VERDICT A fascinating, accessible, and often humorous read for anyone with a brain! And a must-read for neuroscientists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and criminal attorneys.—Judith A. Matthews, Michigan State Univ. Lib., East Lansing
Kirkus Reviews

The more we learn about the human brain, the more puzzling the question of free will becomes.

Forty years ago, cognitive neuroscientist Gazzaniga (Human: The Science Behind What Makes Your Brain Unique, 2008, etc.)—the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara—pioneered the study of the different functions of the right and left hemispheres of the human brain. Since then, it has become clear that what characterizes the human brain is not simply its size—after all, Neanderthal brains were larger—or even the greater connectivity of our neurons than occurs in the brains of our chimpanzee cousins. Neuropsychologists have established that the human brain is composed of specialized modules, local circuits that each operate automatically. "The end result is thousands of modules, each doing their own thing," writes the author, so that "our conscious awareness is the mere tip of the iceberg of non-conscious processing." This capability allowed us to create culture and technology, our hallmark as a species, but we are left with a disturbing question: "[W]hy do we feel so unified and in control" if our conscious experience is the result of "positive feedback" from modules that are each acting independently in response to environmental challenges? Gazzaniga goes on to pose the deeper question of whether can exist if "the thoughts that arise from our minds are also determined," as can be shown experimentally by brain scans. If the brain is made up of subsystems without any one locus of control, can the concept of free will have any meaning? The author examines this knotty question from many different angles and offers a simple analogy to explain how, in his view, consciousness and moral responsibility emerge from social interaction. In other words, the rules of traffic are collective and cannot be reduced to the behavior of individual cars.

A fascinating affirmation of our essential humanity.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061906114
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/11/2012
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 260
  • Sales rank: 419,039
  • Product dimensions: 7.80 (w) x 5.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the president of the Cognitive Neuroscience Institute, the founding director of the MacArthur Foundation's Law and Neuroscience Project, and a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. He lives in California.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

1 The Way We Are 7

2 The Parallel and Distributed Brain 43

3 The Interpreter 75

4 Abandoning the Concept of Free Will 105

5 The Social Mind 143

6 We Are the Law 179

7 An Afterword 217

Acknowledgments 221

Notes 223

Index 243

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2013

    Intended for lay people, the author did a superb job.

    Intended for lay people, the author did a superb job.

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  • Posted June 26, 2012

    Who's in Charge? (Free Will and the Science of the Brain), by Mi

    Who's in Charge? (Free Will and the Science of the Brain), by Michael Gazzaniga is a "popular" presentation of the latest ideas about what mind is and how it is associated with the brain. He covers many topics from quantum mechanics, and chaos theory, to address issues of unpredictability at the subatomic level, to the behavior of neurons, and on to the organization and operation of brain processes. In addition, he makes the connections with present brain characteristics to evolutionary pressures experienced by hominids. All of the general material is well presented in a rather light mood (not my preference) but well done. However, to me the most interesting thing was his presentation of the concept of emergence vis-a-vis all types of systems and, of course, with particular reference to the brain/mind relationship. Finally, he explores how our present and future understanding of the brain/mind will have to have an affect on legal and moral decision making endeavors.
    As a non neuroscientist or psychologist, I found the book very informative, but someone familiarly with these fields may find it rather pedestrian. Also, sometimes (not very often) his writing is not very clear, and can be misleading for a short period, and I found the light mood to be a little annoying. However, I also found the "conclusion" to be too non specific and rather open ended, but on the whole, it is definitely worth reading if you wish to be brought up to speed on the most current ideas in his field.

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    Posted May 14, 2012

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    Posted November 18, 2011

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    Posted June 2, 2012

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    Posted November 22, 2011

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