Who's Tampering with the Trinity?: An Assessment of the Subordination Debate

Overview

There are few beliefs more essential to Christianity than that of the Trinity. In Millard Erickson's most recent scholarly work on the Trinity, he seeks to provide a lucid and judicious answer to the question: Is Jesus eternally subordinate to the Father, or is Jesus equal with the Father? The answer to that debated question arouses further inquiry: Who is God in relation to Jesus and to the Spirit? What do the Scriptures teach about these relationships? How do our beliefs about...

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Overview

There are few beliefs more essential to Christianity than that of the Trinity. In Millard Erickson's most recent scholarly work on the Trinity, he seeks to provide a lucid and judicious answer to the question: Is Jesus eternally subordinate to the Father, or is Jesus equal with the Father? The answer to that debated question arouses further inquiry: Who is God in relation to Jesus and to the Spirit? What do the Scriptures teach about these relationships? How do our beliefs about the Trinity flesh out in real life activities?

How a Christian views the Trinity has implications for understanding not only God but also family roles and relationships. Are wives subordinate to husbands or are they equal? In addition to providing rigorous theological analysis of the subject, Erickson exposes flaws in familial implications derived from the Trinity. This increasingly debated topic has finally received a thorough, careful, and objective treatment in Who's Tampering with the Trinity?.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780825425899
  • Publisher: Kregel Publications
  • Publication date: 4/28/2009
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Considered one of the top evangelical theologians, Millard J. Erickson has written numerous books and articles, including the well-received Christian Theology. He is former president of the Evangelical Theological Society, and before his retirement served as dean of Bethel Seminary.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 22, 2010

    Perhaps the best book on the subordination debate

    Those familiar with Milliard Erickson's previous writings will not be surprised that he offers a comprehensive, balanced, and nuanced summary and critique of both sides of the subordination debate. This book is particularly useful when read in conjunction with Erickson's earlier writings on the Trinty, although the book stands well on its own. My only main concern with this work is that Erickson seems to leave his own methodological and theological presuppositions uncritiqued, which occasions results in him reaching a conclusion that does not seem to follow from the presented argument (see especially his treatment of the relevant biblical texts). One could also make the case that Erickson does not adequately nuance the philosophical aspects of the debate, but such a critique is not necessarily appropriate given the scope of the book and the subjective nature of briefly summarize volumes of philosophical writing.

    If one is looking for a book on the subordination debate, s/he should start with Erickson's text. Even if one disagrees with his conclusions (as this reviewer does) Erickson is so engaging, lucid, and balanced that the reader walks away with a better understanding of the issues, including the reasons why s/he disagrees or agrees with Erickson.

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