BN.com Gift Guide

Who's Who? [NOOK Book]

Overview


Over in these pages
where it's hard to tell who's who,
live six pairs of twins
who are the best at what they do.
"Laugh!" say the twins.
"We laugh!" So will you.
...
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Overview


Over in these pages
where it's hard to tell who's who,
live six pairs of twins
who are the best at what they do.
"Laugh!" say the twins.
"We laugh!" So will you.
And you'll giggle as you read
while you try to tell who's who.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Geist offers a high-spirited salute to animal sounds, movements, and twin siblings, riffing on the nursery rhyme “Over in the Meadow.” Geist’s verse introduces various sibling pairs in outdoor settings: “Over in the barnyard/ where the cows moo and moo,/ lives a noisy little calf/ and her loud twin, Blue./ ‘Moo!’ said the sister./ ‘We moo,’ said the two./ So they moo and they chew/ where the cows moo and moo.” Cole dresses his expressive cartoon animal twins in goofy, nearly matching outfits and provides plenty of action beyond that mentioned in the verse. A zippy if conventional spin on this familiar rhyme. Ages 1–3. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
Praise for Who's Who?:

“The illustrations of fully dressed featured animals are colorful, as are the beasts, birds, and people…” —School Library Journal

“Geist offers a high-spirited salute to animal sounds, movements, and twin siblings…” —Publishers Weekly

“The author's note to this fun-for-the-tongue book says Ken Geist was inspired to write it by his own brother and sister twins.…Henry Cole's illustrations add to the fun—from the argyle pattern end pages to a boisterous bunch of creatures who look like they could have come out of a popular cartoon show.” —Children’s Literature

“This serviceable bedtime story will find the most appeal with families of multiples and brother/sister pairs.” —Kirkus

“…a fun exercise made vivid by the bright acrylic-and-color-pencil illustrations featuring plenty of warm, romping cartoon details (the bats wear Batman logos on tiny T-shirts). According to an opening note, the book was inspired by the famous nineteenth-century counting rhyme 'Over in the Meadow,' by Olive A. Wadsworth.” —Booklist

 

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
The author's note to this fun-for-the-tongue book says Ken Geist was inspired to write it by his own brother and sister twins. So this adaptation of the "Over in the meadow" counting rhyme features six sets of animal twins in a variety of settings from barnyard to meadow to jungle to cave to a final set of owls calling "who" in the night forest. In each pair of spreads, the setting and creatures are introduced and on the next page one twin tells the other what they do. "Moo, said the sister. "We moo," said the two. So they moo and they chew/where the cows moo and moo." Henry Cole's illustrations add to the fun—from the argyle pattern end pages to a boisterous bunch of creatures who look like they could have come out of a popular cartoon show. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
Kirkus Reviews
A classic counting rhyme is subjected to a lackluster treatment in this retelling that focuses on twins. Inspired by his own set of twins and the repetitive rhythm of the poem "Over in the Meadow," Geist features six pairs of animal twins in various habitats. Beginning with a calf twosome on a farm ("Over in the barnyard / where the cows moo and moo, / lives a noisy little calf / and her loud twin, Blue"), the rhyming text continues with bunnies that hop in a garden, long-tailed monkeys that swing in jungle trees, shiny fish that swim in a pond, "itty bitty" bats that flap in a cave, and, finally, silly owlets in the night sky, which giggle and wish children a good night. Cole's cartoonish animals, rendered in acrylic and colored pencil, are usually the highlight of any of his collaborations. Perhaps drawing little inspiration from the pedestrian text, the illustrations lack his typical energy and charm. This serviceable bedtime story will find the most appeal with families of multiples and brother/sister pairs. [Note: An earlier version of this review was published in the July 1, 2012, issue and cited a concern based on a preliminary copy of the book. We publish herewith this revised review, as the problematic text was removed in the final, edited version.] (Picture book. 1-5)
Kirkus Reviews
A classic counting rhyme is subjected to a lackluster treatment in this retelling that focuses on twins. Inspired by his own set of twins and the repetitive rhythm of the poem "Over in the Meadow," Geist features six pairs of animal twins in various habitats. Beginning with a calf twosome on a farm ("Over in the barnyard / where the cows moo and moo, / lives a noisy little calf / and her loud twin, Blue"), the rhyming text continues with bunnies that hop in a garden, long-tailed monkeys that swing in jungle trees, shiny fish that swim in a pond, "itty bitty" bats that flap in a cave, and, finally, silly owlets in the night sky, which giggle and wish children a good night. Cole's cartoonish animals, rendered in acrylic and colored pencil, are usually the highlight of any of his collaborations. Perhaps drawing little inspiration from the pedestrian text, the illustrations lack his typical energy and charm. This serviceable bedtime story will find the most appeal with families of multiples and brother/sister pairs. [Note: An earlier version of this review was published in the July 1, 2012, issue and cited a concern based on a preliminary copy of the book. We publish herewith this revised review, as the problematic text was removed in the final, edited version.] (Picture book. 1-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466816480
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
  • Publication date: 8/7/2012
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 28
  • Age range: 1 - 3 Years
  • File size: 14 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


Ken Geist is an editor of children's books. He lives in New York City with his joyous twins, Owen and Kei--the inspiration for Who's Who?--along with his two older singletons.

Henry Cole is the acclaimed illustrator of nearly 100 children's books. He has twin hobbies of gardening and drawing, and twin homes, one in Florida and one in Virginia. Visit him online at henrycole.net.


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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 10, 2014

          I¿m not a children¿s librarian, and although I do enjoy a

          I’m not a children’s librarian, and although I do enjoy a good picture book, I sometimes don’t agree with what’s on the best of lists. I read them purely for enjoyment, and some more than others as with everything in life, are simply better. This is not one of those books. While the illustrations are incredibly cute and playful, the text and rhyming rhythm of the book seemed off to me.
          The story is comprised of small poems in the wildlife kingdom. From a farmyard to the jungle, the author describes two animals’ antics through rhyming. While it was a cute concept, it didn't work for me. The rhyming doesn’t seem well done in places and the story is disjointed.  In contrast, the illustrations are well done in pastel and earth tones. I enjoyed the subtle jokes within the illustrations, especially the twin bats with the “Batman” shirts. So I guess I would suggest this one for the pretty pictures, but definitely not a good one for read alouds or using to learn rhyming words.      

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