Whose Nose? by Jeanette Rowe, Jeannette Rowe |, Other Format | Barnes & Noble
Whose Nose?

Whose Nose?

by Jeanette Rowe, Jeannette Rowe
     
 
This appealing and attractively designed "lift-the-flaps" book ends with the young reader being asked a question that personalizes the book: "Whose nose is the cutest nose? Your nose!" Color illustrations throughout.

Overview

This appealing and attractively designed "lift-the-flaps" book ends with the young reader being asked a question that personalizes the book: "Whose nose is the cutest nose? Your nose!" Color illustrations throughout.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Simply illustrations combined with bright, bold colors make this book just jump off the shelf. It is the job of the reader to guess whose nose is sticking out from behind the flap. Once you guess, just flip the flap to reveal the character. This a is good book to read aloud to a preschool group. Follow up activities could include having each child draw a different animal nose and then the class could guess which animal the nose belongs to. A book that is sure to bring about plenty of giggles and laughs. 1998, Little Brown, Ages 1 to 4, $7.95. Reviewer: Sharon Tolle
School Library Journal
PreS-K-These lift-the-flap books will be great additions to toddler and preschool storytime programs. Simply drawn animals, outlined in heavy black, frolic on brightly colored pages. The artwork is reminiscent of Katie Davis's in Who Hops? (Harcourt, 1998) and Lucy Cousins's in the "Maisy" books (Candlewick). In Whose Feet? the flaps cover most of each animal's body but keep its feet in view. The kangaroo's characteristic long, flat feet could belong to a rabbit, while the turtle's feet are easily mistaken for an elephant's. The other creatures, however, will be guessed immediately. Whose Nose? includes a pink pig with purple spots, a cheerful blue rhino, and a toothy green crocodile. Each picture is covered by a flap that reveals only the creatures' distinctive profiles. While youngsters are likely to think that the rhino is a dino or call the crocodile an alligator, in general the pictures will be easily identified. Both books end with a question about whose features (feet or nose) are the cutest-and both have the same answer (mine). Two engaging titles.-Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Whose Nose? (16pp.; Sept.; 0-316-75933-3): "Whose nose?" is the question appearing on the lefthand page, while on the right a nose is on display, with its owner hidden by a flap. Some of the noses, rendered in super-saturated colors, are a snap to identify, e.g., the pig's snout is an early give-away, which will encourage children. The rhino's nose, later on, isn't so easy. The mouse's nose and dog's nose share features, so readers will want to really look at the animals. A handsome, participatory, and potentially thought-provoking early natural history. (Picture book. 3-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316759335
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.58(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.27(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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