Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?: The Dangers of Global Warming

Overview

The earth is getting hotter, and not just in the summer.

The climate of your own hometown is changing.

But why is this happening, and can we stop it?

Read and find out!

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Overview

The earth is getting hotter, and not just in the summer.

The climate of your own hometown is changing.

But why is this happening, and can we stop it?

Read and find out!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
The answer to the title's question is global warming, explored in this addition to the "Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science" series for primary-level readers. The author explains global warming and what causes the greenhouse effect. Sources of carbon dioxide are identified in words and pictures (Meisel's bright and generally upbeat ink and watercolor paintings). Images of a street with crowds, buses, and a garbage truck; polar bears on melting ice; kids noting higher water levels and flooding; and an arid desert scene reinforce discussion of problems caused by the greenhouse effect—scientists believe humans are responsible. The two following pages devoted to hedging about whether people are actually causing global warming may not be necessary. Better to cut to some solutions, which do follow—interspersed with urgent warnings about too much logging and loss of plankton, leading to more and faster warming. This book contains quite a lot of information on a serious and scary subject, making it perhaps best suited for use in a classroom or with a parent. Discussion might begin with a comparison of penguins and ice floes on the first and the final double-page spreads: why has the area of ice become so much smaller? What can we do? The author suggests ways for children, families, and nations to help contain global warming, ending with a plea for young readers to learn more about the earth and perhaps become scientists themselves. On an affirmative note, the accompanying illustration shows children enthusiastically exploring sea life in the clear blue water near a beach.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Introductory titles with an environmentalist point of view. The first book offers facts about alligators and their habitat, followed by discussions of why they began to disappear, how their environment changed, and what has been done to save American alligators. Readers are asked to think of ways to save those in China, which continue to be endangered. An activity is included. Ice Caps discusses the need for balance in nature, the greenhouse effect, and what can be done to help combat global warming. In both books, the information is detailed, but not overwhelming. However, the absence of chapters might hinder their use for reports. Colorful illustrations provide details that support the texts.-Christine Markley, Washington Elementary School, Barto, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Posing on icebergs that are considerably smaller on the rear endpapers than the front, flocks of penguins tellingly bookend this call to start worrying about the effects of global warming, and to think about personal-scale ways of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Though Rockwell oddly omits mention of nitrogen and oxygen in her tally of atmospheric gases, and Meisel suggests in one cartoon scene that children might actually perceive a single year's change in sea level, in general readers will find a thought-provoking, balanced mix of facts and opinions that won't leave them feeling helpless in the face of a worldwide catastrophe in the making. A worthy addition to the Lets Read and Find Out series. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060546717
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/7/2006
  • Series: Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Series: Stage 2
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 423,591
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.80 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne and Lizzy Rockwell have collaborated on all the Mrs. Madoff books, including St. Patrick's Day and Presidents' Day, and Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. Anne is the author of What's So Bad About Gasoline?; Brendan and Belinda and the Slam Dunk!; Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?; and Only Passing Through: The Story of Sojourner Truth. Lizzy is the author-illustrator of Good Enough to Eat; The Busy Body Book; and Hello Baby! Both Anne and Lizzy live in Connecticut.

Paul Meisel has illustrated many books for children, including Why Are the Ice Caps Melting?, Energy Makes Things Happen, and What Happens to Our Trash? in the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science series. He lives in Newtown, Connecticut.

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