Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire-- Two Evolutionary Psychologists Explain Why We Do What WeDo

Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire-- Two Evolutionary Psychologists Explain Why We Do What WeDo

2.9 15
by Alan Miller, Satoshi Kanazawa
     
 

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Now available in paperback-a provocative new look at biology, evolution, and human behavior 'as disturbing [as it is] fascinating' (Publishers Weekly).

Why are most neurosurgeons male and most kindergarten teachers female? Why aren't there more women on death row? Why do so many male politicians ruin their careers with sex scandals? Why and how do

Overview

Now available in paperback-a provocative new look at biology, evolution, and human behavior 'as disturbing [as it is] fascinating' (Publishers Weekly).

Why are most neurosurgeons male and most kindergarten teachers female? Why aren't there more women on death row? Why do so many male politicians ruin their careers with sex scandals? Why and how do we really fall in love? This engaging book uses the latest research from the field of evolutionary psychology to shed light on why we do the things we do-from life plans to everyday decisions. With a healthy disregard for political correctness, Miller and Kanazawa reexamine the fact that our brains and bodies are hardwired to carry out an evolutionary mission? an inescapable human nature that actually stopped evolving about 10,000 years ago.

Editorial Reviews

We modern humans work hard to prove that we're an advanced species. Researchers Alan S. Miller and Satoshi Kanazawa think that it's a losing battle. These evolutionary psychologists insist that we've never really transcended our prehistoric ancestors or, for that matter, our fellow primates; we just hide it better. To demonstrate their contention, they insist that men and women are still driven by 10,000-year-old impulses to find an optimal mate and produce healthy offspring. As the subtitle suggests, they link nearly every conceivable aspect of human activity to these primal drives; from selecting a favorite television show to finding religious faith. Sometimes politically correct, but always provocative.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399534539
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/02/2008
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
227,222
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Satoshi Kanazawa received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Arizona. His work has been covered in such newspapers as the New York Times, the Washington Post.

Alan S. Miller was professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Japan's Hokkaido University.

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Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire---Two Evolutionary Psychologis 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book completely engrossing. A must read for everyone, particularly single women. It explains, based on extensive scientific reserch and observation, many of the behaviors, both men's and women's, that we have long wondered about.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The 'sample' doesn't include any content from the book !
The_Reverend More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best scholarly books I have ever read. A solid treatise on the state of Evolutionary Psychology today that is unflinching and certainly not politically correct. Everything from sexual behavior to why we steal and kill and go to war. For those who look around and wonder why people do some of the strange things we do in everyday life, this book will make you say "OK, I get it now". Occasionally there are some far-fetched ideas, and the book doesn't have all the answers (especially were explaining lesbians is concerned) but overall, it would be hard for me to think that someone could read this book and not have at least some of their ideas about humanity changed in some way. This book is my new Bible.
McMama More than 1 year ago
This is a fascinating, lay-person's introduction to evolutionary psychology. Screw Freud, Darwin's the one who REALLY holds the answers to why we do what we do. I read this in two days.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
it is a book of correlations not causation but still interesting and fun to read.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up while browsing mainly because of the catchy title, and read a great deal of it. The book is a series of soundbites to explain human behavior (and even biology) today against the backdrop of evolution. Much of what I read was nonsense and some of it was insulting with a political agenda masquerading as science. I sense that because Kanazawa is on the faculty of the London School of Ecnonomics this may be more a case of the emporer's new clothes rather than rigorous serious science.
alaskagrown More than 1 year ago
I am mortified that by purchasing this book, I might have supported the "research" of pseudo-scientist Satoshi Kanazawa, the principle author. I urge potential buyers to at least google Kanazawa, whose research shows that African countries are entrenched in poverty because of the low IQs of Africans, that women (regardless of race or culture) want to look like Barbie (the blond one) and that men enjoy pornography because their feeble brains can't distinguish between porn and the real thing. I will leave it to the adventurous reader to find the even more ridiculous theory for why women don't like porn. Kanazawa begins with tenuous assumptions of what IS and uses some tricky methods of backwards induction and guesses of what WAS to explain WHY. He combines nuggets of research conducted by people who seem to understand the scientific method with his own half-baked ideas to reveal his true bigotry. Please, don't fall for the catchy title like I did. Kanazawa is trying to bring eugenics and misogyny back into legitimate scientific discourse, and while I am all for freedom of speech, I sure wish I hadn't bought the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Week book, disappointing, the Author does not give answers and/or explain clearly the subjects, lacks of substance. I think, Kanazawa deep down knew this book will not be good. In the Preface, he mentions that the book was his partner's idea 'Alan S. Miller' and that before his death his partner was the one completing the first draft of some chapters but Kanazawa ended up reworking all the chapters his partner left. The title of the book was not even his own idea, it was Marian Lizzi an Editor, also at the end of his Acknowledgments he calls himself 'a delusional man' Saying all of this, how can you trust this book will be of any worth? as a matter of fact, how/who can trust having Kanazawa as an Assistant Professor or as a tenured Reader? Kanazawa is definitively in my NOT to read list.
tootsieCP More than 1 year ago
I read half of this book and lost interest. I would not recommend it new; buy it used.