Why Did Cherokees Move West?: And Other Questions about the Trail of Tears

Overview

On May 26, 1838, U.S. soldiers surrounded Cherokee villages across Georgia. The soldiers came to force Cherokee families to move to a new territory in Oklahoma. The Cherokees had little time to gather their belongings before being herded into camps. From there, 13,000 were forced on the thousand-mile journey to Oklahoma. They had little food and no shelter from the weather. Many—especially children—grew sick and died. The forced march became known as nunna-dual-tsuny—the Trail ...

See more details below
Paperback
$8.95
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$9.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $9.67   
  • New (6) from $9.67   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

On May 26, 1838, U.S. soldiers surrounded Cherokee villages across Georgia. The soldiers came to force Cherokee families to move to a new territory in Oklahoma. The Cherokees had little time to gather their belongings before being herded into camps. From there, 13,000 were forced on the thousand-mile journey to Oklahoma. They had little food and no shelter from the weather. Many—especially children—grew sick and died. The forced march became known as nunna-dual-tsuny—the Trail of Tears.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761361251
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/28/2010
  • Series: Six Questions of American History Series
  • Pages: 48
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    An excellent book for the young student

    The Cherokee people had been on the North American continent long before explorers started to come to the Americas in the 1400s. The Cherokees were located in the Appalachian Mountains and "called themselves Tsa-lagi, meaning the Principal (first of main) People." They believed that their creator, the Great Spirit, had created this land especially for them and they would live there forever. They were an agricultural tribe, but the men were primarily "warriors, hunters, and fishers." The Cherokees were closely tied to nature and had ceremonies to represent such things as the thirteen phases of the moon. Their society included "seven large families, or clans." In their many villages each had a council house which was their most important building. Their lives had remained unchanged for centuries until the arrival of the white man, an arrival that brought great change to the Cherokee tribes. One of the more unfortunate changes was the arrival of serious diseases that brought death to many. The newcomers quest for gold and other natural resources led to fighting and several treaties came into effect between 1721 and 1777, treaties in which the Cherokee "gave up almost half of their hunting grounds." There were so many treaties that eventually these false promises on "paper that rustled" were called "talking leaves . . . [that] blew away when no longer useful." The white man's attempt at civilizing the Cherokee only made them band more closely together. The Cherokee Nation was forged in 1817 and their capital was New Echota in the state of Georgia. The Nation was in turmoil as the white man continued to push to capture their lands. They began to fight back, but they were clearly outnumbered. In 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act and within eight years hundreds of men, women, and children were forced to walk 1,000 miles to a new territory in Oklahoma. It was on this trail, the Trail of Tears, that many lost their lives as they walked away from the very land that the Creator had intended for them. This book is an excellent overview of the Cherokee Nation and why they were forced to leave Georgia for Oklahoma. This clear, concise and well-written history tries to keep as close as possible to the facts and dismisses legend. For example, The Robert Lindneux painting, shown on the cover, shows the Cherokee people on horseback or in wagons. The author clearly states, in response to the fallacy, that, "In reality, most Cherokees had to walk the entire way." There is a lot of history, we see portraits of many people (Cherokee and white), and learn a lot about their culture and lifestyle. I especially liked the sidebars which were "written" on notebook pages. These added many interesting historical vignettes including what the Cherokee's constitution's mission statement was, how some people escaped the roundup, and what they wore for clothing. There is a lot of information in this book that could easily lead to a stepping stone for a school report. There are photographs, art reproductions, and maps throughout the book. In the back of the book is an explanation of John G. Burnett's report (primary source material), a writing exercise, a timeline, an index, and additional recommended book and website resources. Quill says: This is an excellent book in which the young student can learn about the place of the Cherokee Nation in our history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)