Why Do Horses Neigh? [NOOK Book]

Overview

Do you love horses? If you do, you're not alone. There's so much to know about these amazing animals. Why do horses neigh? What are baby and adult horses called? How do horses communicate? Beginning readers can find out the answers to these questions-and many more-in this ...
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Overview

Do you love horses? If you do, you're not alone. There's so much to know about these amazing animals. Why do horses neigh? What are baby and adult horses called? How do horses communicate? Beginning readers can find out the answers to these questions-and many more-in this lively, fact-filled introduction to these popular animals. Filled with colorful illustrations and dynamic color photos of real horses, this is a perfect selection for any young horse lover.



Illustrated by Anna DiVito.

Questions and answers present information about the behavior and characteristics of horses and their interactions with humans.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Holub answers the question posed by the title—horses neigh to say hello, but you don't learn that until about halfway through this nonfiction "Dial Easy-to-Read," Level 3 book, Grades 1 to 3. For all of those who have dreamed of owning or riding a horse, this book is a great first step. It introduces the characteristics of various breeds, describes the smallest and largest horses, parts of the horse's body, ways to measure and tell its age, and ways to recognize a horse, and how it recognizes people. Horses are speedy, and the fastest racing thoroughbreds can run at speeds over forty miles an hour. Horses are intelligent, trainable, and loyal. They also require lots of care, which means grooming as well as mucking out their stalls so that they have a clean, dry place to reside in. Horses do sleep, but mostly in snatches; although they will lie down, then close their eyes to sleep more deeply. Each section starts with a question such as "Why do horses wear shoes?; How do horses keep clean?; Who are some famous horses? It is an easy-to-follow format, and there are plenty of photographs and other full-color illustrations to illuminate the facts presented. 2003, Penguin Putnam,
— Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 2-3-Using a question-and-answer format, Rabbits discusses the different traits and behaviors of rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and gerbils. While all are rodents, each one has its own peculiarities. Horses does the same for horses and ponies. Charming, full-color photographs and drawings, especially those depicting the animals interacting with humans, mostly children, enhance the large-type texts. A winning combination of tightly written narrative, age-appropriate vocabulary, and worthy illustrations guarantees that independent readers will enjoy these titles.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Holub (Why Do Rabbits Hop?, below, etc.) continues her series of easy readers focusing on a particular animal with this offering that will be popular with the younger faction of the horse-crazy set. She uses a question and answer format as the structure to impart a broad overview of the equine world, including horse classifications, behavior, characteristics, care, and an introduction to riding. She works interesting tidbits of information into the text, including some surprising facts that children will enjoy, such as the fact that horses sleep only three hours per day or the statistics about the world’s oldest horse on record. Humorous spot illustrations alternate with full-color photographs of horses, many being held or ridden by children. This combination of illustration styles provides an attractive visual variety, augmented by the leading questions on each page reproduced in purple type. The text is written for readers at the early fluency level, but this will find other uses as well: for younger children who are just getting interested in horses and for older children who are reading below grade level. The amount of information covered in a simple, interesting way makes this an excellent introduction to this popular topic. (Easy reader/nonfiction. 6-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698163225
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/27/2003
  • Series: Penguin Young Readers, L3
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: NOOK Kids Read to Me
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 250,242
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • File size: 30 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Joan Holub
The reason I'm a children's book author/illustrator today is that I have a lot of determination. I practiced drawing and revised my stories over and over because I wanted nothing more than to do what I'm doing now--writing and illustrating children's books.



I always knew I'd become an artist and studied art in college in Texas. After graduating from college, I became an Art Director at a graphic design firm. I moved from Texas to New York to work in children's publishing. I got a job as Associate Art Director in children's books at Scholastic, where I designed books and enjoyed working with editors and illustrators. This was excellent experience.



I illustrated my first children's book in 1992 and soon began illustrating full time. I had always written stories, but I began completing manuscripts and mailing them out to publishers in the early 1990's. In 1996, I sold my first two manuscripts -- Boo Who? (Scholastic) and Pen Pals (Grosset & Dunlap) -- both published in 1997.



Now I write and illustrate full time. It is a great job. When I think of a idea, I write it down so that whenever I finish one story I'll have a bunch of ideas waiting that I can begin working on next. I especially love reading and writing funny stories, weird stories, and animal stories.



Books I've written and illustrated include:


Cinderdog and the Wicked Stepcat Albert Whitman, 2001 (ages 4-8, picture book)

Abby Cadabra, Super Speller, Grosset & Dunlap, 2000 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

How to Find Lost Treasure in All Fifty States and Canada, Too Aladdin, 2000 (ages 8-12, NF)

The Haunted States of America Aladdin, 2001 (ages 8-12, NF)

Vincent Van Gogh: Sunflowers and Swirly Stars, 2001 Grosset & Dunlap (ages 6-9, NF)

Happy Monster Day! Scholastic,1999

Pen Pals Grosset & Dunlap, 1997 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

Ivy Green, Cootie Queen Troll, 1998 (ages 7-9)

Red, Yellow, Green What Do Signs Mean? Scholastic, 1998 (ages 4-8)

Boo Who? A Spooky Lift-the-Flap Book Scholastic, 1997 (ages 1-6)

Eek-A-Boo! A Spooky Lift-the-Flap Book Scholastic, 2000 (ages 1-6)



Books I've written include:


I Have A Weird Brother Who Digested A Fly, Albert Whitman, 1999 (picture book)

Light the Candles, A Hanukkah Lift the Flap Book, Puffin, 2000

The Garden That We Grew Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

The Pizza That We Made Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

Scat Cats! Viking/Puffin, 2001(ages 4-7, easy reader)

Backwards Day, Scholastic, 2000

Why Do Dogs Bark? Puffin, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

Why Do Cats Meow? Puffin, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

The Spooky Sleepover, Grosset & Dunlap, 1999 (ages 6-8, easy reader)

Pajama Party Grosset & Dunlap, 1998 (ages 4-7, easy reader)

Space Dogs on Planet K-9 Troll, 1998 (ages 7-10)



Books I've illustrated include:


Breakout at the Bug Lab Dial, 2001(ages 6-8, easy reader)

Hector's Hiccups Random House, 1999

Shadows Everywhere Scholastic, 1999

Hot Cha-Cha! Winslow Press

No Fair! Scholastic, Hello Math

The 100th Day of School Scholastic

Ten Little Ballerinas Grosset & Dunlap

I Love You Mom Troll

I Love You Dad Troll

My First Book of Sign Language Troll



Answers to questions people sometimes ask me:



1. Where do you get your ideas?


I get ideas many different ways. Sometimes, ideas just pop into my head. I also listen to and watch the people around me for ideas. I read to get ideas. I daydream to get ideas. When I get an idea, I write it down in an idea notebook, so I won't forget it. I think ideas are the easy part of writing. I get lots of ideas for books all the time. Developing them into a book with a beginning, middle and end is the difficult, time-consuming part. The idea is important, but an idea isn't a book until it has been developed into a story that works as a whole from start to finish.



2. When and why did you decide to become an author and artist?


I've been writing and reading stories all of my life. I didn't concentrate on writing children's books until around 1990. In 1991, I began regularly submitting manuscripts to publishers.I began writing because I had story ideas that I thought would make good books. I've always known I would become an artist--ever since kindergarten.



3. Why don't you illustrate all of the books you write?


I haven't had time to illustrate all of the books I write, but I've usually been very happy with the work of the illustrators who have illustrated my books. I wasn't happy with the art in a couple of books, but I don't think it's fair to try and control the artist, so I keep out of the artist's way as much as possible. I continue to illustrate books by other authors as well. I have just as much fun illustrating a book written by someone else as I do illustrating books I write. As long as the story is good, illustrating it is fun.



4. Did you like school when you were a kid?


Most of the time. I got bored during the summer, so I was glad when school started. I loved getting a new lunchbox and choosing what I would wear the first day. But then after about 2 weeks of school, I wished for summer again. I like to read and I made good grades, so school was mostly fun for me.



5. How do you develop your characters and plot?


I've usually already decided on a main charater and 1/4 to 3/4 of a plot before I start writing a story. I just write and work out the rest of the characters and plot as I go along. I have a college art degree, but have no formal training as a writer. I learn the rhythm and structure of stories by reading books and thinking about how they are structured. I also read instructional books about how to write.



6. What is your favorite part about writing? Why?


Getting an idea; finishing a book manuscript; getting an offer from a publisher; and seeing my book in a store are all big thrills. The process of writing is not always fun. But I'm driven to write, and time flies when I'm writing.



7. How hard has it been to get your works published?


It was hard to sell the first manuscript. Then in 1996, I suddenly sold three manuscripts in three months to Grosset & Dunlap and Scholastic.



8. What are your favorite books besides the one(s) you have written?


Spaceship Under the Apple Tree; Martha Speaks; The Giving Tree; A Friend for Dragon; Chrysanthemum; Ruby the Copycat; Marvin Redpost--Is He A Girl?



9. What do you look for in a good book?


Something I think is funny or a feeling I can strongly identify with. A good idea and a memorable plot and characters.



10. Do you have kids or pets? Hobbies?


No kids, but we do have a great cat, who thinks he's our child. For hobbies, I like to hike, bikeride, and read.


Anna Divito lives in Unionville, New York.





























































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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2008

    Excellent series and this is a favorite

    There are 6 books in this series and our favorites are this one and the cats and dogs ones. I've taught for six years now and horses are big favorites with kids year after year. We haven't read the other 3 yet, about rabbits/hamsters/etc, snakes/turtles/etc, and birds, but we plan to over the summer. In a Q&A format, questions are posed such as: Why Do Horses Neigh? and answered in an easily read format that my students could grasp and enjoy. Good content and good binding so it stands up to repeated readings in the classroom, even in paperback. A worthwhile purchase.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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