Why I Left Goldman Sachs: A Wall Street Story

( 17 )

Overview

On March 14th 2012, readers of the New York Times awoke to an Op-Ed "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs." Within 24 hours, 3 million visitors to the Times' website had checked out Greg Smith's account of how an investment bank that was once a proving ground for high-ranking government officials had become a place where clients were referred to as "Muppets."
The Op-ed became one of the most talked about and influential opinion pieces in recent memory. Smith became a global trending ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$21.67
BN.com price
(Save 22%)$27.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (56) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $5.93   
  • Used (45) from $1.99   
Why I Left Goldman Sachs: A Wall Street Story

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$14.99
BN.com price

Overview

On March 14th 2012, readers of the New York Times awoke to an Op-Ed "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs." Within 24 hours, 3 million visitors to the Times' website had checked out Greg Smith's account of how an investment bank that was once a proving ground for high-ranking government officials had become a place where clients were referred to as "Muppets."
The Op-ed became one of the most talked about and influential opinion pieces in recent memory. Smith became a global trending topic on Twitter, generated 120 million Google entries and more than 5,000 articles across the web. The story was carried on the front pages of newspapers across the world, from the US, to the UK and Europe, Australia, Hong Kong, and in South Africa.
The answers to the questions Smith posed in his Op-Ed will become the starting point for his upcoming book-a book in which the author will relate his growing disenchantment with the corporate culture, specifically those ways in which Goldman Sachs has recently taken advantage of its clients, and who is to blame for the collapse in ethics.
WHY I LEFT GOLDMAN SACHS will use scenes, stories and characters from his twelve years at Goldman Sachs to show Main Street why they distrust Wall Street. The book will take the reader inside the walls of an institution that keeps conspiracy theorists up at night

The book will address the following topics:

* Even after the 2008 financial crisis, why does Wall Street still put its own interests ahead of the interests of its clients?
* What danger does this breakdown in trust between banks and their clients pose for global capital markets?
* Is it really true that ethical behavior and big business cannot co-exist at the same time?
* What value should one place on a deep-rooted corporate culture?
* Do people really understand the deep conflicts of interest that still exist at banks that are deemed "Too Big To Fail"?
* And finally, how does Wall Street exploit these conflicts of interest to make so much money?

These questions will not be answered in a preachy way. The book will tackle the above issues with juicy, page-turning anecdotes culled from Smith's own adventures as an intern, trader, analyst, salesman and middle manager.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

"Today is my last day at Goldman Sachs. After almost 12 years at the firm....I believe I have worked here long enough to understand the trajectory of its culture, its people and its identity. And I can honestly say that the environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it." By the standards of American business, Greg Smith's resignation letter was exceptionally critical, what made it unique was that it appeared on the Op-Ed page of the New York Times. This much-anticipated book based on his Goldman experiences will probably determine whether we had an insider's view to a company losing its soul or a front row seat, as some claimed, to watch the midlife crisis of an executive. Certain to gain major reviews.

From the Publisher
A portrait, in Proustian detail, of a world and a mentality that is utterly alien, and should be infuriating, to most of us on Main Street.

— Mark Gongloff, Huffington Post

A personal tale of one person caught up in a wave of greed, betrayal, and a complete disregard for the standards that had made Goldman Sachs the most trusted name on Wall Street.

— David Siegfried, Booklist

[Greg Smith] did what we would all hope that our own banker would do: he spoke out publicly about something that was wrong.

— Hamilton Nolan, Gawker

An insider's take on Goldman Sachs strikes a nerve....it provides a rare inside look into a career path to which many aspire: from nothing to Wall Street affluence. It will also be read because of its characterisation of Goldman's integrity. Where once it profited from helping clients prosper, the bank shifted, Mr Smith contends, into an entity that profited from clients.

— The Economist

...Smith has written a field guide to the culture of Goldman Sachs and a fly-on-the-wall account of Wall Street on the skids.

—USA Today

The author's personal account of the many facets of daily life at Goldman Sachs gives his memoir the power of persuasion and conviction.

— Kirkus

Kirkus Reviews
The controversial former head of Goldman Sachs' United States equity derivatives business for Goldman Sachs in Europe, the Middle East and Africa chronicles his work for, and departure from, the Wall Street financial giant. "If I achieve one thing with this book," writes Smith, "I hope it will be to empower some people with enough understanding" to call their congressional representatives and ask for a modern version of the Pecora Commission, which investigated Wall Street after the 1929 crash and proposed durable reforms. The author became a figure of controversy when, on March 15, 2012, the New York Times published his resignation letter, in which he called the current atmosphere at the company "as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it." Indeed, controversy, criticism and questions about his motivation and ability continue to swirl around his book. Smith chronicles his career, which began when he applied for Goldman's intern program when at Stanford University. He explains how the search for revenues from fees came to overshadow the growth of clients' assets, as dog-eat-dog competitiveness spread among the employees at all levels. In the author's view, the transformation took place gradually over the 12 years he worked for the company. Goldman became bound up with changing views of employees' function in financial transactions and the hunt for "elephant trades," in which "Goldman made $1 million or more in discretionary profit." Smith links this process effectively to the boom-bust bubble cycle, which characterized the financial world during those years. The author's personal account of the many facets of daily life at Goldman Sachs gives his memoir the power of persuasion and conviction.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455527472
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/22/2012
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 450,695
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Greg Smith resigned this spring as the head of Goldman Sachs' United Stated equity derivatives business in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
Born-and-raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, Smith graduated from Stanford University before going to work for the firm in the summer of 2001. He spent his first 10 years in the New York headquarters before moving to London in 2011. Outside of the financial sphere, Smith won a bronze medal for table tennis at the Maccabiah Games in Israel.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 "I Don't Know, but I'll Find Out" 1

Chapter 2 Fall and Rise 30

Chapter 3 The Springbok Has Landed 53

Chapter 4 The End of Something 66

Chapter 5 Welcome to the Casino 91

Chapter 6 Hunting for Elephants 121

Chapter 7 Looking into the Abyss 138

Chapter 8 The Four Clients 160

Chapter 9 "Monstruosities" 176

Chapter 10 London Calling 200

Chapter 11 The Wild West 216

Afterword 245

Author's Note 251

Acknowledgments 253

A Glossary of Trader-Speak 255

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2012

    Educational

    A well written and detailed book everyone should read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2012

    Jpp

    Centers on the change in the culture of Wall Street.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 8, 2014

    A fast paced and interesting read that only serves to confirm wh

    A fast paced and interesting read that only serves to confirm what anyone with a modicum of sense already new about the Wall Street / Goldman culture. At times its a little self serving, but nothing I couldn't personally look past and laugh off for what it was.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2013

    Very good read for me. I recommend this book to all people. Like

    Very good read for me. I recommend this book to all people. Like Greg said to Mom & Pop. We are the ones affected by their greed and should be aware and take action. I love is "call to arms". I will contact my congressman and congresswoman. They should have the guts to do something about our corrupt system.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Good read.

    I have read over half a dozen books about the financial mess we are in - yes we are still in it. No one seems to listen to any of these authors about the culture of the "too big to fail" banks. Smith, whom I hope is as altruistic as he writes, needs an audience. So buy the book and read it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2013

    Excellent. Really paints the picture vividly and educating along

    Excellent. Really paints the picture vividly and educating along the way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 2, 2013

    Usually I get bored easily when I read books, but this one! I lo

    Usually I get bored easily when I read books, but this one! I loved it. It's about intimidating, funny, and  interesting life at Sachs. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2013

    Eric and Jenny

    Eric sits and Jenny lays on her bed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Fascinating!

    An excellent read regarding the ins & outs of wall street. Very interesting and an eye opener. Thanks for the insight Greg!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2012

    Smith elaborates on the culture and insides of GS in a way for e

    Smith elaborates on the culture and insides of GS in a way for everyone to understand. He conflicts the positives and negatives in his career with the firm. This book is a must read for anyone seeking to know what a career at Goldman Sachs is like. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)