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Why Medieval Hebrew Studies?: Inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University of Cambridge, 11 November 1999
     

Why Medieval Hebrew Studies?: Inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University of Cambridge, 11 November 1999

by Stefan C. Reif
 
The Jewish Middle Ages were not, as was once supposed, full of 'doom, gloom and pedantry'. Medieval Hebrew manuscripts testify to stunning theology, super-rational exegesis, and interesting notions of language usage. There are unexpectedly 'modern' interpretations of the Hebrew Bible in Spain and France and exciting fragments from the Cairo Genizah, including a prayer

Overview

The Jewish Middle Ages were not, as was once supposed, full of 'doom, gloom and pedantry'. Medieval Hebrew manuscripts testify to stunning theology, super-rational exegesis, and interesting notions of language usage. There are unexpectedly 'modern' interpretations of the Hebrew Bible in Spain and France and exciting fragments from the Cairo Genizah, including a prayer to be recited by medieval pilgrims to Jerusalem. Among more prosaic Genizah items are a crusader note in Latin, a certificate about kosher cheeses, an appeal for financial assistance, and a doctor's faith in God over his own medicine. Stefan C. Reif shows that Medieval Hebrew culture is a vibrant and compelling field of study.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521010474
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
09/06/2001
Pages:
54
Product dimensions:
4.84(w) x 7.32(h) x 0.35(d)

Meet the Author

Stefan C. Reif is Professor of Medieval Hebrew Studies and Director of the Genizah Research Unit in the University of Cambridge. His publications are: Shabbetai Sofer and his Prayer-Book (1979); (ed.) Interpreting the Hebrew Bible (1982); Published Material from the Cambridge Genizah Collections (1998); (ed.) Genizah Research After Ninety Years (1992); Judaism and Hebrew Prayer (1993); Hebrew Manuscripts at Cambridge University Library (1997); A Jewish Archive from Old Cairo (2000); and over two hundred articles.

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