Why Men Fail

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stewart Mason
Neilson Hubbard's 1997 solo debut, The Slide Project, was a textbook example of straight-up power pop. Unfortunately, parts of it sound like it could have been recorded by a dozen other power pop bands. Originality wasn't really that album's strong suit, though it was a perfectly pleasant listen. On the other hand, the 2001 follow-up, Why Men Fail, is an entirely different beast, and it definitely doesn't sound like a standard-issue power pop album. The album title is the first tip-off: This is not sunny, upbeat music. These 12 songs are mostly hushed minor-key ballads, stately tempos, and vocals that sound like they were recorded in a library. The sound makes a lot more ...
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2002-01-01 AUDIO CD New 795306106326 NEW, SEALED! ! FREE UPGRADE TO FIRST CLASS! ! Ships Within 24 Hours-Satisfaction Guaranteed! JJ50.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stewart Mason
Neilson Hubbard's 1997 solo debut, The Slide Project, was a textbook example of straight-up power pop. Unfortunately, parts of it sound like it could have been recorded by a dozen other power pop bands. Originality wasn't really that album's strong suit, though it was a perfectly pleasant listen. On the other hand, the 2001 follow-up, Why Men Fail, is an entirely different beast, and it definitely doesn't sound like a standard-issue power pop album. The album title is the first tip-off: This is not sunny, upbeat music. These 12 songs are mostly hushed minor-key ballads, stately tempos, and vocals that sound like they were recorded in a library. The sound makes a lot more sense when one discovers that the Mississippi native got his start in a Galaxie 500 cover band; with its anguished vocals, acoustic guitar, and mournful strings, the opening "Towns" sounds like it could have come directly off This Is Our Music. Even the more up-tempo songs, like the mildly funky "The Last American Hero," which features an ultra-distorted clavinet that makes it sound like an outtake from Cotton Mather's Kon-Tiki, are rather dark, and the overall effect of listening to the whole album in one sitting can be pretty bleak. On the other hand, the songwriting is much more consistent this time around, and the arrangements feature enough cool touches and varied sounds to keep the album from sounding as monochromatic musically as it does lyrically. Power pop purists might consider Why Men Fail a little too much of a downer, but fans of the darker side of June and the Exit Wounds or Richard Davies will be intrigued.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/1/2002
  • Label: Parasol Records
  • UPC: 795306106326
  • Catalog Number: 63

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Towns (3:13)
  2. 2 Speedin' (4:34)
  3. 3 Wonderful Pain (4:45)
  4. 4 Her Father's Buick (3:57)
  5. 5 The Last American Hero (3:19)
  6. 6 The Girl That Killed September (4:35)
  7. 7 Hollywood 1995 (4:29)
  8. 8 Surrounded (3:02)
  9. 9 Where It Hurts (5:04)
  10. 10 Settle (3:57)
  11. 11 Beautiful Yesterday (4:02)
  12. 12 Sweet Goodnight (1:04)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Neilson Hubbard Primary Artist, Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Percussion, Piano, Vocals, bass pedals, Casio
Peter Holsapple Organ, Piano, Accordion
Clay Jones Dulcimer, Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Percussion, Electric Guitar, Mellotron, Omnichord
Craig Krampf Percussion, Drums
David Lowery Background Vocals
Bill Roberts Horn
Garrison Starr Background Vocals
David Henry Cello
Will Kimbrough Electric Guitar, Omnichord, E-bow, Plucked Piano
Ned Henry Violin
Jason Wilkins Bass
Tywanna Jo Baskette Background Vocals
Chuck Hatcher Clavinet, Wurlitzer
Technical Credits
Greg Calbi Mastering
Clay Jones Producer, Contributor, Microcassette
Davis McCain Engineer
Mike Scotella Engineer
John Travis Engineer
Stuart Sikes Engineer
Aaron Shannon Engineer
David McCain Engineer
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