Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears
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Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears

4.0 25
by Verna Aardema, Leo Dillon, Diane Dillon
     
 

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"In this Caldecott Medal winner, Mosquito tells a story that causes a jungle disaster. "Elegance has become the Dillons' hallmark. . . . Matching the art is Aardema's uniquely onomatopoeic text . . . An impressive showpiece."
-Booklist, starred review.  See more details below

Overview


"In this Caldecott Medal winner, Mosquito tells a story that causes a jungle disaster. "Elegance has become the Dillons' hallmark. . . . Matching the art is Aardema's uniquely onomatopoeic text . . . An impressive showpiece."
-Booklist, starred review.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble Staff
Mosquito tells iguana such a preposterous tall tale that iguana puts sticks in his ears so he won't have to hear her nonsense. This causes a chain of events that upsets all the animals. When lion calls a council to solve the problem, the animals realize mosquito is at fault. To this day, mosquitoes whine in people's ears to ask if everyone is still angry.
From the Publisher
"In this Caldecott Medal winner, Mosquito tells a story that causes a jungle disaster. "Elegance has become the Dillons' hallmark. . . . Matching the art is Aardema's uniquely onomatopoeic text . . . An impressive showpiece."
-Booklist, starred review.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140549058
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
08/28/1992
Series:
Picture Puffin Books Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
43,152
Product dimensions:
8.56(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.13(d)
Lexile:
770L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Verna Aardema published her first set of stories, Tales from the Story Hat, in 1960. They were so successful that  she continued to adapt traditional tales and folklore from distant cultures, (usually from Africa and Mexico) to expose young children to the vast variety of human expression. She's the author of over 30 children's books. Her book, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears (1975) received the Caldecott Medal in 1976 and the Brooklyn Art Books for Children Award in 1977. Who's in Rabbit's House? 1977 was the 1977 School Library Journal Best Book of the Year and a Lewis Carroll Shelf Award winner in 1978. Aardema received the Children's Reading Round Table Award in 1981, and several of her works have been selected as Notable Books by the American Library Association. Her Oh Kojo! How Could You! won the 1984 Parents' Choice Award for Literature.

Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon, a husband-and-wife team, created more than 100 book and magazine covers together as well as interior artwork. The Dillons won the Caldecott Medal in 1976 and 1977 In 1978 they were the runners-up for the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award for children's illustrators, and were the U.S. nominee again in 1996.

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Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am getting this story for myself, though it was one of my favorites as little kid. I think I first heard it when I was six or seven, and it was the ending I loved most.
Time_Stand_Still More than 1 year ago
My six year old picked this book out and we had to read it as soon as we got home. I negotiated to wait till bedtime but he asked severaltimes more. Once we read it I was glad I did not wait. This is a charming book and the pictures are very eye catching. The story was well developed and left room for my son to ask many questions about the animals in the book. I would recommend this book to anyone with a child wanting to listen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Why do mosquitoes buzz in people's ears? That is a question that i have wondered for a long time. Well it turns out in Africa, there was an order of events that happend to cause this. One day an iguana was drinking from the water hole and a mosquito came and told him a story. 'Iguana you will never believe what I saw yesterday' said the mosquito. 'I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as i am'. The iguana was grumpy so he didn't want to listen any more so he stuck sticks in his ears. He was walking along and and the big snake saw him and said 'Good morning, Iguana.' But the iguana did not answers. What is going to happen now that the big snake has his feeling hurt? Will we ever find out? Verna Aardema was born in Michigan and graduated from Michigan State University. She published her first books in 1960. Her book, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears, won the Caldecott Award in 1976. I really enjoy this book because it has a theme its better to listen to the foolishness then to tune everything out because some information may be overlooked and may lead to some problems. The reading level of the book is third grade, second month. I would recommend for people to read this book, they will like it. Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Puffin Books, 1975.
CKJK More than 1 year ago
In this folktale, the mosquito tells a lie which sets off a series of cause and effect events that affect all of the other animal characters in the story. The animals are each called in turn to tell their side of the story to King Lion until he learns that the problem can be traced back to the mosquito. This is another Verna Aardema story that is great for teaching or pointing out story sequence and cause and effect.
Kaimilalola More than 1 year ago
This book is creatively written. It has a nice lesson to be learned. It has nice rhythm, the pictures are stunning and the ending is quite intelligent! The only negative is the death of the owlet, which upset my five-year old and three-year old a bit.
ASDgma More than 1 year ago
I like to create story boards & literature linked activities for emergent readers, and especially for my grandchildren. This book offers a fun combination of "insect lore" & folk tales. Since some of my grands are multi-racial (part African American & more!), it speaks to their roots, as well. I will also share this story when I take them camping for the first time, so they'll have a fun way to understand :"why mosquitos buzz in people's ears"! The artwork is also beautiful. ASDgma
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about a mosquito who tells an iguana a tall tale, so the iguana puts sticks in his ears so he won¿t hear the mosquito¿s nonsense. Which in affect causes a chain reaction that gets all the animals upset. Read the book to find out what the council meeting was about and who held it. Aandema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Puffin Books, 1975.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a west african tale about a mosquito that ends up causing quite a stirr in the jungle. It is a great book that has a good point, and has a cute ending....' Is everyone still made at me' The mosquito buzzes..He is anwsered with a 'KPAO'. This drawings in this book are amazing! This would be good for 3rd grade students!Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquetoes Buzz in People\'s Ears. New York, NY: Dail Books for Young Readers, 1975.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Caldecott Book Title: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears Reading Level: 4th Grade Genre: Traditional/Fiction About the Author: Verna Aardema was born in New Era, Michigan, attended schools there, and received her degree in journalism from Michigan State University. She has written seven previous books of African folk stories. Her most recent, Behind The Back Of The Mountain: Black Folktales From Southern Africa, was illustrated by the Dillons. Aardema now lives in Muskegon, Michigan, with her husband, Dr. Joel Vugteveen. She has retired from teaching and devotes her full time to writing. Book Review: While most of us have never really thought about it, there is a reason Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. This story begins with a mosquito telling an iguana a story, ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ The iguana found this story so annoying and ridiculous that he stuck two sticks in his ears to keep from hearing anymore. This causes a chain reaction of events to take place that leads to utter chaos throughout the forest. Sadly, there was an unfortunate accident and a young owlet was killed during the turmoil. It was Mother Owl who normally woke up the sum each day, but when she found out what had happened to her little owlet, she didn¿t have the heart to wake the sun. The animals all got worried and King Lion called a meeting of the animals to find out why Mother Owl would not wake the sun. Eventually, all was resolved and life returned to normal again when Mother Owl found out what had happened and ¿She turned her head toward the east and hooted: ¿Hoo! Hooooo! Hooooooo! And the sun came up.¿ This book was very enjoyable and I would recommend it for reading. Bibliographic Information: Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: The Dial Press, 1975.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears is a West African Tale that involves several animals and is a great story of what could have happened to the mosquito. It all started with a mosquito saying to an iguana, ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ The iguana replied ¿what¿s a mosquito compared to a yam? I would rather be deaf than listen to such nonsense!¿ So, ¿he stuck two sticks in his ears and went off.¿ When he passed a python who said, ¿good morning¿ the iguana didn¿t respond because the sticks were in his ear. The python thought ¿he is plotting some mischief against me.¿ The frightened python went into a rabbit hole to hide. The python scared the rabbit, and then the running rabbit alarmed the monkey who leapt through the trees and landed on a dead limb that broke. When it fell, it landed on ¿an owls nest, killing one of the owlets. When mother owl got home to her nest, the other children told her that the monkey had killed the owlet. ¿It was mother owl who woke the sun each day so that dawn could come.¿ This time she didn¿t wake the sun and the other animals got worried. The King Lion called a meeting and got to the bottom of it. Read to find out why Mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears. Verna Aardema wrote this educational book about animals. I thought this was a great book and made good relation of the animals to one another. She started writing when she was eleven years old. Her mother noticed that she had a real talent in writing and encouraged her to continue writing. She studied Africa for a little bit. This is why most of her stories are based on African folktales.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book that begins with a tall tale and has a series of events that follow that ends with a lot of misunderstanding. The book should capture the attention of a younger audience, probably K-1st. The pictures are colorful and the text carries out a storyline that should keep children wondering what will happen next. This story could also be used as an example to children of the result of miscontrewed stories and how the end result could have a dramatic effect.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Verna Aardema was born in Michigan and graduated from Michigan State University. Even as a little girl, she dreamed of becoming a writer. She loved to read, and every minute she got a chance to would read. She published her first books in 1960. Her book, Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears, won the Caldecott Award in 1976. The book also received the Brooklyn Art Books for Children Award in 1977. The central theme of the book is that it is better to listen to foolishness then to tune everything out because some information may be overlooked and may lead to some problems. Mosquito told the Iguana some nonsense. In the book, it says ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ He did not want to listen to it so he plugged his ears with two sticks. Since Iguana did this, it led to a chain of events. It created chaos within the jungle. What happened to the animals? Why do mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears? Read the book to find out more about why mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears. The reading level of the book is third grade, second month. The book is very descriptive with the wording, and has very detailed illustrations. I like how both the wording and illustrations worked together to create a wonderful story. I would recommend for people to read this book, they will like it. Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Puffin Books, 1975.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears is a Caldecott Award book. The Mosquito caused lots of trouble in the forest. He told a lie to the iguana. The mosquito told the iguana ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ The iguana put sticks in his ears to that he couldn¿t hear the mosquito. He met the python and did not speak. A chain reaction occurs. Read the book to find out why people splat mosquitoes when they buzz in their ears. This book would be good for grades 4-8. I enjoyed this tale. I had never heard it before. This is a traditional book. Verna Aardema died in August of 2000. She spent most of her life retelling African folktales. She grew up in Michigan. She married Albert Aardema. Aadems, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Pied Piper, 1975.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bet that you never thought that their was a reason for it did you? To find out what this reason is you should read the story ¿Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears.¿ The story all begins when a mosquito tells his friend, the iguana, a story. ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ Iguana found this story so ridiculous that he stuck two sticks in his ears to keep from hearing any more. This sparks a chain of events that leads to utter chaos in the forest. It is only ended with an unfortunate accident. I young owlet was killed during all of the turmoil. The mother owl was so devastated that she could not signal the end of night and beginning of day. Therefore, night continued. This causes panic among the other animals. King lion organized a meeting to investigate the situation and to find out where it originated. To find out if the problem is solved, and why do mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears read the rest of this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Why do mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears? Verna Aardema, the author of this African tale has the answer. One morning while an iguana, minding his own business drinking fresh water from a nearby waterhole, was interrupted by a mosquito. The iguana told the mosquito he¿d rather not be annoyed with his babbling. Mosquito was going on and on not making any sense. So that the iguana could not hear the mosquito jabber he stuck a stick in each ear, and went on his own way. Along the way the iguana passed a snake. The snake said hello to be friendly but, the iguana couldn¿t hear. The snake got scared thinking the iguana was up to no good, and ran into a rabbit hole. Scaring the rabbit, the rabbit ran through the woods catching the attention of a crow. The crow assumed their lives were in danger, so he flew the woods cueing all the other animals that harm is upon them. A monkey starting leaping from tree top to tree top helping warn others when he leap onto a branch that broke killing a baby owl. When mother discovered that one of her young had been killed, she became so sad. She had the duty of waking the sun each day, and for days the entire forest was dark. With so much confusion and commotion the king of the forest called meeting. King Loin managed to trace the problem all the way back to the mosquito, to learn that it was really the mosquito that caused the death of the owlet. Mother owl found peace, ascertain who had killed her baby, and realize she had to go on hooting for the sun to come up. The repetition in this book is great for struggling readers to gain confidence. It also helps us to find humor in those annoying little mosquitoes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mosquito loved to fib, so one morning when he saw an iguana, he told him a lie, ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ The iguana became annoyed, so he stuck two sticks in his ears and walked away. A little ways along he came across a python who tried to talk to him, but with the sticks in his ears, he couldn¿t hear the python. The python did not know that the iguana could not hear him and he thought that the iguana was plotting mischief against him, so he hurried off to hide in a rabbits¿ hole. But ¿when the rabbit saw the big snake coming into her burrow, she was terrified¿ and she took off. A crow saw the rabbit running and assumed that something was wrong, so he flew into the forest and sounded a danger call. Then a monkey heard the danger call and took off to warn the other animals, but all of the sudden, a disaster occurred, and the big question was, who was responsible? Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears is a great book for children of all ages, and the lessons it teaches are good lessons for people of all ages to pay attention to (even adults). There are a couple of good lessons in this book. One of them is that sometimes you really need to listen. When the iguana did not listen to the snake, it set off a chain reaction which eventually led to a disaster. For when you don¿t listen, you might miss something very important. Another good lesson that can be taken from this book is that you cannot always put the blame on everyone else. Sometimes everyone is at fault in some way, and that is just what happened in this story. When all of the animals just jumped to conclusions and panicked, they all created the chaos which led to disaster. Lastly, the big lesson of this folktale is that you should not spread rumors which are not true. The spreading of rumors is what caused the iguana to put sticks in his ears, and all of the animals to create chaos. This book¿s bright illustrations are definitely deserving of the Caldecott medal which it received, however, I do not feel that this book is one to be read and reread for a lifetime. For when I read this book as a child, I loved it, but now, reading it as an adult, I really didn¿t enjoy it. Verna Aardema currently lives with her husband Albert in Fort Myers, Florida. She began writing at the age of eleven in a cedar swamp behind her house which was her inspiration for writing. Verna graduated from Michigan State College with a degree in journalism, but she did not start to write children¿s stories until she started making them up for her daughter who refused to eat unless she was told a story. Most of her stories are African folktales because of her fascination with Africa. To date, she has published over twenty-five books and they have been translated into six other languages. Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1975. RL: Ages 4-8, Grades PreK-3
Guest More than 1 year ago
It all starts with a whisper from a mosquito into an iguana¿s ears and ends in darkness because the sun will not come up. A West African Tale retold by Verna Aardema about a chain reaction throughout the forest. The Lion tries to get to the bottom of everything as the blame keeps getting passed down from the monkey to the rabbit to the snake and finally to the iguana. Even though the mosquito never gets blamed it has a guilty conscience. That is why ¿to this day she goes about whining in people¿s ears: Zeeee! Is everyone still angry at me? When she does that, she gets an honest answer.¿ A much deserved Caldecott Award winner with the colorful illustrations that lets the reader climb right into the forest.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Everyone has had an annoying little mosquito in their ear from time to time, however, did you know that there was a reason he was there? This cute little story by Verna Aardema explains the real reason why pesky mosquitoes do what they do. The story all begins when a mosquito begins telling an iguana a story, and then at the end of the story the iguana thought it so ridiculous that he stuck two sticks in his ears to keep from hearing any more. This sparks a huge chain of events in the forest, which ends with the death of a young owlet. The mother owl too devastated to signal the end of night and beginning of day causes panic among the other animals to think it may never be day again. I recommend this book to anyone that wants to know the real reason for pesky mosquitoes. The author of this book Verna Aardema was born in Michigan. She began writing when she was eleven years old her mother noticed her talent at this age and began actively encouraging her to write. Her first stories were written when her daughter began refusing to eat until her mother told her a story. Aardema also studied Africa for a while, and many of her stories, like this one, are based on African folktales.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Have you and a friend ever had a misunderstanding? That is just what happens in this book, ¿Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears.¿ One day mosquito was telling his friend iguana, ¿I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.¿ Then iguana replied grumpily back to mosquito, ¿What¿s a mosquito compared to a yam?¿ ¿I would rather be deaf than listen to such nonsense!¿ Then he stuck two sticks in his ears and takes off. Because iguana had sticks stuck in his ears, he could not hear python¿s greeting, which frighten him and so he dove into the nearest rabbit hole. Which caused rabbit to run away and when crow saw rabbit running he raised the alarm that danger was near. When monkey heard the alarm he when leaping though the trees and broke a branch and it fell on owl¿s nest killing an owlet. With her owlet die, mother owl was so heart broken, she couldn¿t hoot to awake the sun and so night continued, and then king lion called a meeting to investigate what the problem was, and where it had started. To find out if the problem gets solved, and why do mosquitoes buzz in people¿s ears you need to read the rest of the book. The author of this book, Verna Aardema, was born in New Era, Michigan on June 6, 1911. Raised with eight brothers and sisters, Verna would sneak off to read a book, avoiding her chores. After graduating from Michigan State University in 1934, she taught school in Michigan from 1934 to 1973. While raising her children, she would tell them ¿feeding¿ stories which where folktales taken from Africa. She wrote more than 25 books which were based on stories from Africa. Verna loved to attend storytelling sessions for young people. She passed away in August of 2000, but her spirit lives on in many books she wrote for children. Aardema, Verna. Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People¿s Ears. New York: Penguin Young Readers Group, 1975
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story is truly an onomatopoeic art. The story also has an important moral, too. Never spread a rumor that you know isn't true. Why Mosquitoes Buzz In People's Ears is an excellent storybook for all ages
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. The drawings are AMAZING!!! No wonder it won the Caldecott Award! Verna Aardema made this book very good. She even wrote the sounds. You could hear them while you were reading the book. Leo and Diane Dillion made this book great! The drawings were OUTSTANDING! I would recommend this book to anyone! Everyone should read this book at least once!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read this story, and I believe it is a very good story. But I wouldnt use it as a rational. It is a very kiddie story, but I feel children of all ages will like this story.However, I always had a problem with the main idea of the storyline itself. Readers can come to all kinds of conclusions about this story. But yet the book comes to one for you. For instance, the reason Mosquitoe buzzed in people ears could be because they were so interested in her and less interested in themselves and wanted to be guided by her without her permission or wants. And they were buzzing in other peoples earsabout her, and everybody listened because she was so amazing and maybe they were envious of her wits. Whether the buzzing was true, untrue or half true they did it anyway because they are the ones people are most likely to believe because there are many of them who are consversation thirsty as them to hear anything that they feel can make them feel sickly better about themselves because they are so fascinated with her that they want to bring her down to their level. And because they were truly the weak and petty ones who were doing all the buzzing. They made her buzz too. But her buzzing was more powerful because she knew their game but played by their dirty rules and people wanted to immulate her because they found her to be the opposite of their sickness. And she was the winner in the end because she was able to find out exactly what sick games they were up to and why they felt the need to waste their times buzzing about her. It was because everyone else was doing it. And it would be fun to have people notice you, and petty jealousy. So, maybe she decided to turn the tables on them, to find out why they are so guilty and have no shame in their game. Because people like to play games, but do not want to have the game played on them! If they all had a life, there would be no buzzing! When my teacher read this story to my class in school, she tried to use different ideas and conclusion to this story. So people wouldn't have the same one tracked mind or idea. There can always be two sides to every story!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was the Caldecott Medal winner in 1976 for the best illustrated children's book of that year. The book is a retold version of a West African folk tale which will charm anyone who hears it. This book is not only good for parents to read to their children, it is also appropriate for use in the classroom for K - 2nd grade. The book subtly explores the unseen hand of causation to expand children's horizons about the effects of what they do. In so doing, it raises a number of interesting issues that you can discuss together. The story is organized as follows. A mosquito sets off a string of causation. At the end of the causation, there is an investigation which gradually unveils the causation. Realizing the causation solves the problem, and has an unintended consequence. The book's overall point is that we all need to be better listeners. Since poor communication and listening are the most important causes of problems, this story can be the foundation to focus a child on improving in both of those areas. 'The mosquito siad, 'I saw a farmer digging yams that were almost as big as I am.'' 'I would rather be deaf than listen to such nonsense!' was the Iguana's reaction. So he put 2 sticks into his ears to block out the sound of the mosquito. (Hardly a good role model for listening.) Because Iguana could not hear, he ignored Python's greeting. Frightened by this, Python dived down the nearest rabbit hole. Doing this caused the rabbit to scurry away. Crow spotted the rabbit running, and raised the alarm that danger was near. Monkey heard the cry and leapt through the trees. One of the branches broke, and Monkey fell into Owl's nest killing an owlet. When Mother Owl returned, she was so heart broken she could not hoot to awaken the sun. So night continued. King Lion called a meeting of the animals to investigate. Beginning with Owl, he uncovers the source of the problem. The last to be questioned was Iguana. 'Yes,' said the iguana. 'It was mosquito's fault.' The cry went up, 'Punish the mosquito!' 'When Mother Owl heard that, she was satisfied. She turned her head towards the east and hooted . . . .' 'And the sun came up.' Mosquito has listened to all this from a nearby bush. Mosquito crept away. 'But because of this the mosquito has a guilty consicence.' 'To this day she goes about whining in people's ears. 'Zeee! Is everyone still angry at me?'' 'When she does that, she gets an honest answer.' The illustrations are based on cut-outs of vivid pastel shades that make the story even more lively. As you can see, the book takes causation past where responsibility really goes. So you will have a chance to discuss that mosquito wasn't really guilty of the owlet's death. It was just an accident. The mosquito was an indirect cause of the owlet's death, but not a blameworthy one. Iguana plays a much bigger and more blameworthy role, but is still not a murderer. But everyone tends to see the blame lying elsewhere (in this story, as in real life). Obviously, the science facts are not all correct here. The sun would rise anyway, and the mosquito's sound probably plays some role in reproduction. You should discuss with your child how the human mind makes associations that are not logical and miss the real causes. Also, who should be punished in this story? Actually, no one, but societies tend to create punishments even for innocent activity. This animal group is no exception. Despite not being guilty, mosquito still feels uncomfortable. This is a good thing to discuss. Victims of crimes often blame themselves for somehow causing their own victimization. Finally, what would have been a better response by Iguana? Why did Python run rather than sticking around to get better information? You can use these areas to help you child understand the important role of questions in unlocking solutions. I also suggest that you practice a little together. Find some event, and try to trace the