Why Not Socialism?

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Overview

"Why Not Socialism? very elegantly advances philosophical arguments that Cohen has famously developed over the past twenty years, and it does so in a manner that is completely accessible to nonphilosophers. The book brilliantly captures the essence of the socialist ethical complaint against market society. Why Not Socialism? is a very timely book."—Hillel Steiner, University of Manchester

"Cohen makes out the case for the moral attractiveness of socialism based on the rather homely example of a camping trip. The positive argument of his book is impressive, and there is a rather disarming combination of simplicity of presentation and example with a deep intellectual engagement with the issues. It is very clear that there is an analytically powerful mind at work here."—Jonathan Wolff, author of Why Read Marx Today?

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Editorial Reviews

The Guardian
Beautifully written. . . . In sublimely lucid fashion, Cohen draws up taxonomies of equality, offers ethical objection to capitalism . . . and distinguishes between two questions: is socialism desirable?; and, if desirable, is it feasible? . . . Tiny books are all the rage in publishing nowadays; this is one of the few that punches well above its weight.
— Steven Poole
The Australian
Cohen brings his characteristic clarity to his final defence of socialism.
— Tim Soutphommasane
London Review of Books
Characteristically lucid, engaging and gently humorous. . . . Cohen says things that need to be said, often better than anyone else; and his last book is especially effective as an argument against the obstacles to socialism typically ascribed to human selfishness. His style of argument is very accessible, and it is certainly a more attractive mode of persuasion than dreary analyses of how capitalism actually works.
— Ellen Meiksins Wood
Centre Daily Times
Is socialism really such an alien way of organizing human society? In this stimulating essay titled Why Not Socialism? (just 92 pages long), the late Oxford philosopher G. A. Cohen invites us to think seriously about what socialism has to offer in comparison with capitalism.
— Sanford G. Thatcher
Socialist Review
[A] stimulating and thoughtfully argued advocacy of the better world that we need to fight for.
— Andrew Stone
Philosophers' Magazine
A quietly urgent book.
— Owen Hatherley
Commonweal
No doubt the best forms of socialist organization will emerge, like everything else, after much trial and error. But a vast quantity of preliminary spadework is necessary to excavate the assumptions that keep us from even trying. With Why Not Socialism?, Cohen has turned over a few shovelfuls, bringing us a little nearer the end of the immemorial—but surely not everlasting—epoch of greed and fear.
— George Scialabba
Socialist Studies
[Here] we have a renowned scholar producing an accessible, concise work addressing a vital topic from a committed, progressive standpoint: would that more of today's academic star scholars would follow this example.
— Frank Cunningham
Radical Philosophy
Why Not Socialism? is a lucid and accessible statement of some of Cohen's deepest preoccupations.
— Alex Callinicos
Political Studies Review
However small the package . . . the problems that Cohen addresses in this slim volume are of enormous importance, and can be taken seriously by readers ranging from those with only a tangential interest in the field, to serious scholars of egalitarian and socialist thought.
— Robert C. Robinson
London Review of Books - Ellen Meiksins Wood
Characteristically lucid, engaging and gently humorous. . . . Cohen says things that need to be said, often better than anyone else; and his last book is especially effective as an argument against the obstacles to socialism typically ascribed to human selfishness. His style of argument is very accessible, and it is certainly a more attractive mode of persuasion than dreary analyses of how capitalism actually works.
Centre Daily Times - Sanford G. Thatcher
Is socialism really such an alien way of organizing human society? In this stimulating essay titled Why Not Socialism? (just 92 pages long), the late Oxford philosopher G. A. Cohen invites us to think seriously about what socialism has to offer in comparison with capitalism.
The Guardian - Steven Poole
Beautifully written. . . . In sublimely lucid fashion, Cohen draws up taxonomies of equality, offers ethical objection to capitalism . . . and distinguishes between two questions: is socialism desirable?; and, if desirable, is it feasible? . . . Tiny books are all the rage in publishing nowadays; this is one of the few that punches well above its weight.
Socialist Review - Andrew Stone
[A] stimulating and thoughtfully argued advocacy of the better world that we need to fight for.
Philosophers' Magazine - Owen Hatherley
A quietly urgent book.
The Australian - Tim Soutphommasane
Cohen brings his characteristic clarity to his final defence of socialism.
Commonweal - George Scialabba
No doubt the best forms of socialist organization will emerge, like everything else, after much trial and error. But a vast quantity of preliminary spadework is necessary to excavate the assumptions that keep us from even trying. With Why Not Socialism?, Cohen has turned over a few shovelfuls, bringing us a little nearer the end of the immemorial—but surely not everlasting—epoch of greed and fear.
Socialist Studies - Frank Cunningham
[Here] we have a renowned scholar producing an accessible, concise work addressing a vital topic from a committed, progressive standpoint: would that more of today's academic star scholars would follow this example.
Radical Philosophy - Alex Callinicos
Why Not Socialism? is a lucid and accessible statement of some of Cohen's deepest preoccupations.
Political Studies Review - Robert C. Robinson
However small the package . . . the problems that Cohen addresses in this slim volume are of enormous importance, and can be taken seriously by readers ranging from those with only a tangential interest in the field, to serious scholars of egalitarian and socialist thought.
From the Publisher
"Characteristically lucid, engaging and gently humorous. . . . Cohen says things that need to be said, often better than anyone else; and his last book is especially effective as an argument against the obstacles to socialism typically ascribed to human selfishness. His style of argument is very accessible, and it is certainly a more attractive mode of persuasion than dreary analyses of how capitalism actually works."—Ellen Meiksins Wood, London Review of Books

"Is socialism really such an alien way of organizing human society? In this stimulating essay titled Why Not Socialism? (just 92 pages long), the late Oxford philosopher G. A. Cohen invites us to think seriously about what socialism has to offer in comparison with capitalism."—Sanford G. Thatcher, Centre Daily Times

"Beautifully written. . . . In sublimely lucid fashion, Cohen draws up taxonomies of equality, offers ethical objection to capitalism . . . and distinguishes between two questions: is socialism desirable?; and, if desirable, is it feasible? . . . Tiny books are all the rage in publishing nowadays; this is one of the few that punches well above its weight."—Steven Poole, The Guardian

"[A] stimulating and thoughtfully argued advocacy of the better world that we need to fight for."—Andrew Stone, Socialist Review

"A quietly urgent book."—Owen Hatherley, Philosophers' Magazine

"Cohen brings his characteristic clarity to his final defence of socialism."—Tim Soutphommasane, The Australian

"No doubt the best forms of socialist organization will emerge, like everything else, after much trial and error. But a vast quantity of preliminary spadework is necessary to excavate the assumptions that keep us from even trying. With Why Not Socialism?, Cohen has turned over a few shovelfuls, bringing us a little nearer the end of the immemorial—but surely not everlasting—epoch of greed and fear."—George Scialabba, Commonweal

"[Here] we have a renowned scholar producing an accessible, concise work addressing a vital topic from a committed, progressive standpoint: would that more of today's academic star scholars would follow this example."—Frank Cunningham, Socialist Studies

"Why Not Socialism? is a lucid and accessible statement of some of Cohen's deepest preoccupations."—Alex Callinicos, Radical Philosophy

"However small the package . . . the problems that Cohen addresses in this slim volume are of enormous importance, and can be taken seriously by readers ranging from those with only a tangential interest in the field, to serious scholars of egalitarian and socialist thought."—Robert C. Robinson, Political Studies Review

The Guardian
Beautifully written. . . . In sublimely lucid fashion, Cohen draws up taxonomies of equality, offers ethical objection to capitalism . . . and distinguishes between two questions: is socialism desirable?; and, if desirable, is it feasible? . . . Tiny books are all the rage in publishing nowadays; this is one of the few that punches well above its weight.
— Steven Poole
Socialist Studies
[Here] we have a renowned scholar producing an accessible, concise work addressing a vital topic from a committed, progressive standpoint: would that more of today's academic star scholars would follow this example.
— Frank Cunningham
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691143613
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 8/24/2009
  • Pages: 92
  • Sales rank: 244,994
  • Product dimensions: 4.00 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

G. A. Cohen (1941-2009) was emeritus fellow of All Souls College, University of Oxford. His books include "Karl Marx's Theory of History: A Defence" (Princeton), "If You're an Egalitarian, How Come You're So Rich?", and "Rescuing Justice and Equality".

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Table of Contents

CHAPTER I: The Camping Trip
CHAPTER II: The Principles Realized on the Camping Trip
CHAPTER III: Is the Ideal Desirable?
CHAPTER IV: Is the Ideal Feasible? Are the Obstacles to It Human Selfishness, or Poor Social Technology?
CHAPTER V: Coda
Acknowledgment

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