Why People Obey the Law / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.28
(Save 79%)
Est. Return Date: 10/19/2014
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $22.01
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 44%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $22.01   
  • New (8) from $22.98   
  • Used (4) from $22.01   

Overview

People obey the law if they believe it's legitimate, not because they fear punishment--this is the startling conclusion of Tom Tyler's classic study. Tyler suggests that lawmakers and law enforcers would do much better to make legal systems worthy of respect than to try to instill fear of punishment. He finds that people obey law primarily because they believe in respecting legitimate authority.

In his fascinating new afterword, Tyler brings his book up to date by reporting on new research into the relative importance of legal legitimacy and deterrence, and reflects on changes in his own thinking since his book was first published.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Law Society Journal - Andrew Goldsmith
Tyler's book posits an alternative model of legal compliance—one that focuses upon ways of obtaining public consent for and cooperation with particular regulatory regimes.... Though written from the perspective of the discipline of social psychology, there are lessons here for everybody involved or interested in legal regulation, governance or, indeed, community relations.
Times Literary Supplement - Roger Hood
Praise for the original edition: [T]he argument and findings of Why People Obey the Law have important implications for the debate about the way in which people subject to legal procedures should be treated. . . . [T]he study is provocative and raises an issue of real importance.
Michigan Law Review - V. Lee Hamilton
Praise for the original edition: Theoretically and empirically, Tyler makes a powerful case. . . . The data set is unusually rich.
Law & Society Review - Austin Sarat
Praise for the original edition: [A] major contribution by a well-known, well-respected scholar in the field.
Contemporary Sociology - Dario Melossi
Praise for the original edition: Tyler's book is interesting, significant, and clearly written. Most important, it contributes to an urgent need for critical consideration of . . . an ideology whose main results have been the current shameful state of the American penal system.
From the Publisher

Praise for the original edition: "[T]he argument and findings of Why People Obey the Law have important implications for the debate about the way in which people subject to legal procedures should be treated. . . . [T]he study is provocative and raises an issue of real importance."--Roger Hood, Times Literary Supplement

Praise for the original edition: "Theoretically and empirically, Tyler makes a powerful case. . . . The data set is unusually rich."--V. Lee Hamilton, Michigan Law Review

Praise for the original edition: "[A] major contribution by a well-known, well-respected scholar in the field."--Austin Sarat, Law & Society Review

Praise for the original edition: "Tyler's book is interesting, significant, and clearly written. Most important, it contributes to an urgent need for critical consideration of . . . an ideology whose main results have been the current shameful state of the American penal system."--Dario Melossi, Contemporary Sociology

"Tyler's book posits an alternative model of legal compliance--one that focuses upon ways of obtaining public consent for and cooperation with particular regulatory regimes.... Though written from the perspective of the discipline of social psychology, there are lessons here for everybody involved or interested in legal regulation, governance or, indeed, community relations."--Andrew Goldsmith, Law Society Journal

Times Literary Supplement
Praise for the original edition: [T]he argument and findings of Why People Obey the Law have important implications for the debate about the way in which people subject to legal procedures should be treated. . . . [T]he study is provocative and raises an issue of real importance.
— Roger Hood
Michigan Law Review
Praise for the original edition: Theoretically and empirically, Tyler makes a powerful case. . . . The data set is unusually rich.
— V. Lee Hamilton
Law & Society Review
Praise for the original edition: [A] major contribution by a well-known, well-respected scholar in the field.
— Austin Sarat
Contemporary Sociology
Praise for the original edition: Tyler's book is interesting, significant, and clearly written. Most important, it contributes to an urgent need for critical consideration of . . . an ideology whose main results have been the current shameful state of the American penal system.
— Dario Melossi
Law Society Journal
Tyler's book posits an alternative model of legal compliance—one that focuses upon ways of obtaining public consent for and cooperation with particular regulatory regimes.... Though written from the perspective of the discipline of social psychology, there are lessons here for everybody involved or interested in legal regulation, governance or, indeed, community relations.
— Andrew Goldsmith
Times Literary Supplement
Praise for the original edition: "[T]he argument and findings of Why People Obey the Law have important implications for the debate about the way in which people subject to legal procedures should be treated. . . . [T]he study is provocative and raises an issue of real importance.
— Roger Hood
Contemporary Sociology
Praise for the original edition: "Tyler's book is interesting, significant, and clearly written. Most important, it contributes to an urgent need for critical consideration of . . . an ideology whose main results have been the current shameful state of the American penal system.
— Dario Melossi
Michigan Law Review
Praise for the original edition: "Theoretically and empirically, Tyler makes a powerful case. . . . The data set is unusually rich.
— V. Lee Hamilton
Law & Society Review
Praise for the original edition: "[A] major contribution by a well-known, well-respected scholar in the field.
— Austin Sarat
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691126739
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 4/17/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 898,295
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom R. Tyler is University Professor at New York University, teaching in the Psychology Department and the Law School. He studies the exercise of authority in groups, organizations, and societies. His many books include "The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice, Social Justice in a Diverse Society, Cooperation in Groups," and "Trust in the Law".

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)