BN.com Gift Guide

Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun?: How Reginald Lewis Created a Billion-Dollar Business Empire [NOOK Book]

Overview

Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun? is the inspiring story of Reginald Lewis: lawyer, Wall Street wizard, philanthropist — and the wealthiest black man in American history.

When six-year-old Reginald Lewis overheard his grandparents discussing employment discrimination against African Americans, he asked, “Why should white guys have all the fun?" This self-assured child would grow up to become the CEO of Beatrice International and one of ...
See more details below
Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun?: How Reginald Lewis Created a Billion-Dollar Business Empire

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$9.95 List Price

Overview

Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun? is the inspiring story of Reginald Lewis: lawyer, Wall Street wizard, philanthropist — and the wealthiest black man in American history.

When six-year-old Reginald Lewis overheard his grandparents discussing employment discrimination against African Americans, he asked, “Why should white guys have all the fun?" This self-assured child would grow up to become the CEO of Beatrice International and one of the most successful entrepreneurs ever. At the time of his death in 1993, his personal fortune was estimated in excess of $400 million and his vast commercial empire spanned four continents. Despite the notoriety surrounding Lewis's financial coups, little has been written about the life of this remarkable man. Based on Lewis's unfinished autobiography, as well as scores of interviews with family, friends, and colleagues, the book cuts through the myth and media hype to reveal the man behind the legend. What emerges is a vivid portrait of a proud, fiercely determined individual with a razor-sharp tongue — and an intellect to match — who would settle for nothing less than excellence from himself and others.

This inspirational story of one of the most dynamic entrepreneurs of our time tells how Reginald Lewis created a billion-dollar business empire. Rising from a Baltimore ghetto to Harvard Law School and into the elite circle of Wall Street deal makers, he went on to engineer the historic buyout of food giant Beatrice International before his untimely death in January 1993. Photos.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This biography of business magnate Lewis is based on his unfinished autobiography; he died in 1993 at age 50 from brain cancer. Walker, who writes for the ``Money'' section of USA Today, completed the book after interviewing Lewis's family, friends, colleagues and employees. Lewis, growing up in an African American family in segregated Baltimore, attended parochial school, worked his way through college and Harvard Law and became a successful attorney and highly visible business executive, capping his career with the leveraged buyout of conglomerate Beatrice International Foods for $985 billion in 1987. His personal fortune was $400 million, we learn in this inspiring bio/business study, which deftly conveys Lewis's concerns not only about his work but also about his family, race and his own death. Photos not seen by PW. First serial to Black Enterprise. Nov.
Library Journal
This work tells the story of a black man who rose to become a top CEO. [Reviewed on p. 82.]
School Library Journal
YA-Even as a small child, Lewis's goal was to become the richest black man in America. When he died of brain cancer at age 50 in 1993, he was worth over $400 million and was considered by Forbes magazine to be one of the 400 wealthiest Americans. Not only was he an extremely successful businessman, but he was also a caring philanthropist. His journey from middle-class Baltimore resident to international citizen makes for fascinating reading. He was in the process of writing his autobiography when he died, and Walker consulted many sources in order to give a full and accurate account of this intense, goal-oriented man's life. Lewis's words appear in italics; Walker's, in Roman typeface, provide additional information. Walker discusses his subject's private life, but he concentrates more on the business aspects. This is enough. It is inspiring to see how one individual can plan ahead and overcome both racial and financial obstacles to become such a world-wide success.-Pat Royal, Crossland High School, Camp Springs, MD
Brad Hooper
Lewis' in-your-face title emphasizes the fact that in the high-stakes games of leveraged buyouts and deal making that were played in the 1980s, none of the participants were black until he came along. Lewis died of brain cancer in 1993 at the age of 50; he had begun work on his autobiography, which forms the basis of this book and which was completed by Walker, a financial writer for "USA Today". The story of Lewis' journey from east Baltimore's ghetto to Harvard Law School to Wall Street makes fascinating and inspiring reading.
David Rouse
Lewis' "in-your-face" title emphasizes the fact that in the high-stakes games of leveraged buyouts and dealmaking that were played in the 1980s, none of the participants were African American until he came along. In 1984, with only $1 million in equity, he leveraged the $25 million purchase of McCall's Pattern Company, and four years later he sold it for $63 million, pocketing $50 million. Shortly after that he successfully acquired Beatrice International, the huge food conglomerate with holdings in 31 countries. Lewis' personal fortune grew to $400 million and he was an active philanthropist, giving $3 million to Harvard University and $1 million to Howard University. Lewis died at the age of 50 of brain cancer in January 1993. He had successfully avoided the press but had begun work on his autobiography, which forms the basis of this book and which was completed by Walker, a financial writer for "USA Today". The story of Lewis' journey from east Baltimore's ghetto to Harvard Law School to Wall Street to the awareness of his impending death makes both fascinating and inspiring reading.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781574780536
  • Publisher: Black Classic Press
  • Publication date: 8/26/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 318
  • Sales rank: 166,225
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Reginald F. Lewis was chairman, chief executive officer, and principle shareholder of TLC Beatrice International Holdings, Inc., until his untimely death of brain cancer in January 1993. He was fifty years old when he died.

Blair Walker is a former financial reporter with USA Today. He has been writing professionaly since 1980. He has been an editor with New York Newsday and the Washington Post, and has been a reporter witht he Baltimore Sun and the Chicago bureau of The Associated Press. Blair has also freelanced for Emerge, AutoWeek, Fortune, Africans Americans on Wheels and BET Weekend magazines. He currently lives with his family in Columbia, Maryland.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Partial table of contents:
A Kid from East Baltimore.
Lewis's ``Demon Work Ethic'': The High School Years.
``I'm Going to Be a Millionaire'': Lewis at Virginia State.
No Application Needed: Breaking Down the Doors of Harvard Law.
Building His Own Law Practice: The Years of Struggle.
``Masterful'' Man: Winning Loida Nicolas.
``I Was Not Ready.'' Piloting McCall for a 90-to-1 Gain.
The Biggest Deal of All: The Billion-Dollar LBO of Beatrice.
Taming a Business Behemoth.
A Door to a New Universe.
Connoisseur, Philanthropist, Citizen of the World.
Epilogue.
Sources Interviewed.
Index.
About the Authors.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2007

    Enthusiastic.

    This work tells the story of a black man who rose to become a top CEO. Author BLAIR S. WALKER, discusses the chronicle of his subject's private life based on dozens of interviews and also consulting many sources and borrowing on an unfinished autobiography Reginald Lewis wrote shortly before his death from brain cancer in order to give a full and accurate account of this intense, goal-oriented man's life. If motivation and inspiration is what you seek, you will find it in various chapters throughout the book. Power packed with valuable business lessons on deal making and negotiations, this book has the ability to cultivate your mind set in many a positive ways. Lewis was a tough- minded narcissistic individual. He was a man set on being an exception to life's ugly stereotypes towards African Americans. Although the book does fall short in not talking about the deaths of two keystone figures in Lewis's life which was his grand pop and grand mom who were considered some of his greatest strength as a boy. Lewis and his two LBO's became a greater success than the famous 'burning bed' blunder by the former First Boston. Overall, you will find this book an entertaining read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2005

    Extremely Interesting!

    This is an extremely interesting biography! It gives hope that anyone can succeed in a huge way. Strongly recommended to anyone who wants to succeed in businees.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2003

    Great inspiration for young afro-american entreprenuers

    This was one of the first books I read when I became truly interested in entering the world of business. As a young afro-american man, it gave me inspiration in a world where all I saw around me was successful men of every other nationality but mine. It shows us that with hard work and persistance, the ground becomes level, and your success becomes equal with your abilities.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2002

    Inspiring!

    This book has re-defined how I do business in corporate america. Reggie's story showed me how to break through the glass ceilings. This story is one that all young entrepreneurs should read regardless of your race. The hardest thing to believe is that these people actually made all that money!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)