Why Smart People Do Stupid Things with Money: Overcoming Financial Dysfunction

Why Smart People Do Stupid Things with Money: Overcoming Financial Dysfunction

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by Bert Whitehead
     
 

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Every year since 1994, Worth magazine has named Bert Whitehead among the “Best 60 Financial Advisors in America.” His unique “behavioral finance” approach goes beyond mere number crunching to help people understand and overcome the complex psychological baggage they bring to their financial decisions. Tested and confirmed by hundreds of…  See more details below

Overview

Every year since 1994, Worth magazine has named Bert Whitehead among the “Best 60 Financial Advisors in America.” His unique “behavioral finance” approach goes beyond mere number crunching to help people understand and overcome the complex psychological baggage they bring to their financial decisions. Tested and confirmed by hundreds of Bert’s clients—including celebrities such as Andrew Weil, M.D., who wrote the foreword for the book—this system shows readers how to identify areas of financial dysfunction and offers specific strategies designed to help different personality types achieve financial freedom by working with their own natural inclinations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402747342
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
06/01/2007
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

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Why Smart People Do Stupid Things with Money: Overcoming Financial Dysfunction 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an analytical person who will analyze the facts and then make my decisions about money based upon my emotions. I had always wondered why this was the case until I read this book. Now that I understand myself better, I feel more in control of my financial life. I particularly like the visual of the investment pyramid and the analogy of the farmer. Understanding the different purposes of stock, bonds and real estate in my portfolio has helped to motivate me to save more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well thought out and easy to understand for the average person.