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Why Switzerland?
     

Why Switzerland?

by Jonathan Steinberg
 

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First published in 1976, this revised and extended edition offers a unique analysis of the structures that make Switzerland work. Linking an analysis of the microeconomy to politics, history, religion and language, it reveals how a bottom up society has survived in a world of top down states.

Overview

First published in 1976, this revised and extended edition offers a unique analysis of the structures that make Switzerland work. Linking an analysis of the microeconomy to politics, history, religion and language, it reveals how a bottom up society has survived in a world of top down states.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I recommend that you buy it, read it, and realise what you are missing - not just the railways- by not being Swiss." -Swiss Express

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521281447
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
11/27/1980
Edition description:
2. ed
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.43(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.55(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"I recommend that you buy it, read it, and realise what you are missing - not just the railways- by not being Swiss." -Swiss Express

Meet the Author

Jonathan Steinberg is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Modern European History and former Chair of the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania, and an Emeritus Fellow of Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He gave the biennial Leslie Stephen Lecture on 25 November 1999 at Senate House, University of Cambridge, with the title 'Leslie Stephen and Derivative Immortality'. He was the principal author of The Deutsche Bank and its Gold Transactions during the Second World War (1999). He is also the author of Yesterday's Deterrent: Tirpitz and the Birth of the German Battle Fleet (1965), All or Nothing: The Axis and the Holocaust, 1941-43 (1990) and Bismarck: A Life (2011), which was shortlisted for both the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction (2011) and the Duff Cooper Prize (2012).

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