Why the Poor Pay More: How to Stop Predatory Lending

Overview

The proverbial American dream of owning a home has become an all-too-real nightmare for a growing number of families. The most vulnerable segments of our society—including minorities, the elderly, and working families—are being victimized by financiers who lure them into commitments they cannot fulfill. Collectively known as predatory lending, these practices include offering higher interest rates than can be justified by the risk, high pre-payment penalties that lock families into exploitative loans, and ...

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Overview

The proverbial American dream of owning a home has become an all-too-real nightmare for a growing number of families. The most vulnerable segments of our society—including minorities, the elderly, and working families—are being victimized by financiers who lure them into commitments they cannot fulfill. Collectively known as predatory lending, these practices include offering higher interest rates than can be justified by the risk, high pre-payment penalties that lock families into exploitative loans, and monstrous balloon payments that often result in default and the loss of the home. The net result can be disastrous: damage to one's credit rating, bankruptcy, and even the loss of lifelong savings.

Why the Poor Pay More is an incisive exposure of these practices: how they have evolved, why they have become so prevalent in recent years, and how their negative effects can be quantified. It features in-depth analysis from prominent scholars, legal experts, and community leaders, who shed new light on the social, political, and economic consequences of predatory lending. Why the Poor Pay More is much more than an indictment of these insidious discriminatory practices. It is a call to arms for anyone concerned about how the financial-political system can be corrupted to serve the needs of the wealthy. Highlighting community initiatives already underway to combat predatory lending and an extensive listing of practical resources, Why the Poor Pay More outlines active roles that individuals, advocacy groups, financial and legal service providers, and policymakers can play in reversing this destructive trend.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780275981860
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/30/2004
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.48 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

GREGORY D. SQUIRES is Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Department of Sociology at The George Washington University. Currently on the Board of Directors of the Woodstock Institute and the Advisory Board of the John Marshall Law School Fair Housing Legal Support Center in Chicago, he has served as a consultant and expert witness for fair housing groups and civil rights organizations around the country and as a member of the Consumer Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Board. He has written for several academic journals and general interest publications, including Social Science Quarterly, Urban Affairs Review, the New York Times, and the Washington Post. His recent books include Insurance Redlining, Color and Money, Urban Spraw, and Organizing Access to Capital.

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Table of Contents

Foreword: Loan Sharks in Pinstripes by Clarence Page

The New Redlining by Gregory D. Squires

The Targets of Predatory Lending: Who Are They and Where Do They Live? by John Taylor, Josh Silver, and David Berenbaum

The Economic Consequences of Predatory Lending: A Philadelphia Case Study by Ira Goldstein

Predatory Lending Practices: Definition and Behavioral Implications by Patricia A. McCoy

Legal and Economic Inducements to Predatory Practices by Christopher A. Richardson, Deborah N. Goldstein, and Keith Ernst

Community Organization and Advocacy: Fighting Predatory Lending and Making a Difference by Maude Hurd and Lisa Donner, with Camellia Phillips

Designing Federal Legislation That Works: Legal Remedies for Predatory Lending by John Relman, Fred Rivera, Meera Trehan, and Shilpa Satoskar

Predatory Lending Goes Global: Consumer Protection in a Deregulation Network Economy by Matthew Lee

Predatoriness, and What We Can Do about It by Chester Hartman

Appendix: Predatory Lending Resources

Notes

Index

About the Editor and Contributors

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