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Why the South Lost the Civil War
     

Why the South Lost the Civil War

by Beringer, Herman Hattaway, Archer Jones, William N. Still,Jr.
 
More than one hundred years after the South's surrender at Appomattox, Civil War battles rage on. Beyond the largely settled question of who lost and who won, dissension remains about how and why the war concluded as it did.

Overview

More than one hundred years after the South's surrender at Appomattox, Civil War battles rage on. Beyond the largely settled question of who lost and who won, dissension remains about how and why the war concluded as it did.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
According to the authors, the South lost the Civil War because Southern nationalism was weak, indeed almost nonexistent. Previously, many reasons have been cited for Confederate collapse, such as states rights squabbles, the Union's naval blockade, economic weaknesses, and inadequate military leadership. The authors make interesting but not always convincing counterarguments, concluding that states rights actually helped the Confederacy, the naval blockade was ineffective, the South's economy kept its armies supplied, and military leadership was about equal on both sides. While refuting views of several historians, including those in Why the North Won the Civil War, edited by David Donald (1960), the essays here are, overall, not as persuasive as in that book, though they are sure to renew the historical debate. Suitable mainly for university and large public libraries. History Book Club main selection. Joseph G. Dawson III, History Dept., Texas A&M Univ., College Station
From the Publisher

"[The authors] show that the Southern states were not united around a single leader or cause. . . . In the end, they discovered that God did not wear gray."--New York Times

"The most comprehensive, sophisticated, and well-informed [book on this subject] I have ever read."--New York Review of Books

"Should be required reading for anyone interested in the Confederate experiment. Its superb analysis of the previous literature, including respectful disagreement with many of the conclusions of Owsley, McWhiney, Jamieson and other prominent historians, makes it an ideal starting point for any discussion of Confederate defeat."--Dallas Times-Herald

New York Times

[The authors] show that the Southern states were not united around a single leader or cause. . . . In the end, they discovered that God did not wear gray.

New York Review of Books

The most comprehensive, sophisticated, and well-informed [book on this subject] I have ever read.

Dallas Times-Herald

Should be required reading for anyone interested in the Confederate experiment. Its superb analysis of the previous literature, including respectful disagreement with many of the conclusions of Owsley, McWhiney, Jamieson and other prominent historians, makes it an ideal starting point for any discussion of Confederate defeat.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780820308159
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press
Publication date:
05/10/1986
Pages:
608
Product dimensions:
6.37(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.74(d)

Meet the Author


Richard E. Beringer is a professor of history at the University of North Dakota and the coeditor of a volume of The Papers of Jefferson Davis. Herman Hattaway is a professor of history at the University of Missouri in Kansas City and the coauthor with Archer Jones of How the North Won: A Military History of the Civil War. Archer Jones is emeritus professor of history and former dean at North Dakota State University. William N. Still Jr. is a professor of history at East Carolina University and the author of several books, including Odyssey in Gray: A Diary of Confederate Service, 1863-1865.

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