Why the Sun and Moon Live in the Sky

Why the Sun and Moon Live in the Sky

by Niki Daly
     
 

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There was once a time when Sun and Moon lived on the earth—but that was before the rapturous Sun invited the never-ending Sea to visit in this playful version of an eastern Nigerian (Ibibio) creation myth. "This delightful story is outfitted in humor, a mock seriousness, and drama....A wondrous and alluring work."—Kirkus Reviews.  See more details below

Overview

There was once a time when Sun and Moon lived on the earth—but that was before the rapturous Sun invited the never-ending Sea to visit in this playful version of an eastern Nigerian (Ibibio) creation myth. "This delightful story is outfitted in humor, a mock seriousness, and drama....A wondrous and alluring work."—Kirkus Reviews.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In the beginning Sun and Moon live happily on earth, keeping house in grand style and sharing elegant taste. But when roving Sun discovers Sea, who "shimmers and dances without end" and whose songs are "as soothing as sleep," he is infatuated and invites Sea home to meet Moon. Insolent Sea fills the house and rises-and rises. To escape Sea, Sun and Moon take to the sky, where their divided destinies are sealed: Moon establishes a separate residence "with her star children on the dark side of time." Daly's witty illustrations immerse this Nigerian tale in offbeat charm. His sophisticated watercolors showcase sketchy images borrowed from Renaissance motifs. A wonderful balance of high energy and refined aesthetics. Ages 4-up. (May)
Children's Literature - Leila Toledo
Daly's story is based on an African tale about the sun and moon. According to the legend, the sun and moon originally lived on earth until the sun, enraptured with the sea, invited her home. This resulted in dire consequences.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4Daly bases his retelling on a legend told by Elphinstone Dayrell in Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria West Africa, (Green & Co., 1910; o.p.). The social customs of the Ibibio tribe are manifested in the tale of the Sun's insistent invitation to the Sea to come visit his home in order to return her hospitality. When the Sea arrives, with all her children in tow, the Sun and Moon, flooded out of their house, are forced to live in the sky. Daly's version is more sophisticated than the original; his Moon is a materialistic wife who, annoyed with her husband's foolishness, flees to ``the dark side of time, where Sun and Moon never meet.'' Framed cartoonlike watercolor illustrations in shades of blue, brown, and rust on cream-colored backgrounds show indications of the Earth's beginning (a rainbow with dove and hands reaching from the sky, a large egg hatching, a dinosaur feeding at a tree) mingled with details reminiscent of the Renaissance period in the Sun's house. Blair Lent's illustrated edition of the original Dayrell tale (Houghton, 1990) is a more authentic representation of Nigerian folklore with illustrations indicative of African culture.Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Janice Del Negro
Daly takes a familiar bibio (Nigerian) folktale and reinterprets it using some unusual, very appealing illustrations. Sun, an adventurous roamer, lives on earth with Moon, a domestic homebody. Sun invites Sea and all her children to visit, but Sea floods the house, causing great distress for Moon. The flooding forces Sun and Moon into the sky, where they have been to this day. Daly's watercolor illustrations personify Sun and Moon as lord and lady of the manor, with Renaissance images (astronomical and otherwise) adding a sense of play and personality. Daly uses a palette of muted golds and blues, and has framed the images with lines of burnt sienna. Although the illustrations do not reflect the culture of the tale's origin, the sophisticated imagery is sure to "amuse the gods and entertain the reader." The size and format make the book acceptable for reading aloud to groups, but the details of the pictures demand a closer look. No specific source notes are given.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688133313
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/01/1995
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.60(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

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