Why vs Why Big Australia

Why vs Why Big Australia

by Jessica Brown, Oliver Hartwich, Mark O'Connor
     
 

The question of whether Australia should welcome population growth or avoid it remains unresolved. The issue raises its head in public debate in different guises – from controversies over importing labour to filling vacancies in booming industries like mining, to temporary work visas and refugee quotas, from pressure on infrastructure and services in cities

Overview

The question of whether Australia should welcome population growth or avoid it remains unresolved. The issue raises its head in public debate in different guises – from controversies over importing labour to filling vacancies in booming industries like mining, to temporary work visas and refugee quotas, from pressure on infrastructure and services in cities to boosting regional areas – who makes up Australia’s population and what level it should be remains a sticky issue.

The two positions are presented in an easy to read 2-books-in-1 format. Both authors discuss the seven key reasons why we should say yes/no to a big Australia and further investigate the evidence behind each of these reasons through their seven chapters. Importantly, this book leaves no issue hanging. On top of their seven key arguments, each author gives a punchy rebuttal to their opponent’s specific arguments.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781921997198
Publisher:
Pantera Press
Publication date:
08/27/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
128
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Jessica Brown is a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Independent Studies. Her research at the CIS has focused on population, family policy, welfare reform, disability pensions, parental leave and foreign policy. She has published widely in these areas. Jessica comments regularly in the media on social policy issues. She has been published in major newspapers such as the Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian and the Herald Sun, and has appeared on television programs such as Q&A, The Drum, and Today Tonight and on radio programs around Australia. She holds a Master of International Studies from the University of Sydney and a Bachelor of Arts (Hons.) from the University of Melbourne, where she majored in Political Science. Jessica Brown and Oliver Marc Hartwich are authors of Populate and Perish: Modelling Australia’s Demographic Future, and Why A Growing Australia is Nothing to Fear, both published by the CIS.
Oliver Marc Hartwich is the Executive Director of The New Zealand Initiative in Wellington. Before that he was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Independent Studies from October 2008 to April 2012. His area of expertise is local government and federalism, urban economics, European affairs and Industry policy. He was previously, the Chief Economist at the British think tank, Policy Exchange, London. His publications with Policy Exchange mainly dealt with housing and planning, urban regeneration and transport policy. Before that he worked as an adviser to Lord Oakeshott of Seagrove Bay in the UK House of Lords. He studied Business Administration and Economics at Bochum University (Germany). After graduating with a Master’s Degree, he completed a PhD in Law at the universities of Bochum and Sydney (Australia) while working as a Researcher at the Institute of Commercial Law of Bonn University (Germany).
Mark O’Connor (b. 1945) is an award-winning Australian poet and environmental writer with a special interest in population. He is an editor of the Oxford University Press textbook Protected Area Management: Principles and Practices (2001). He is the author of This Tired Brown Land and co-author of Overloading Australia: How Governments and Media Dither and Deny on Population, the book which Dick Smith sent to all Australian MPs and mayors in 2010. He has taught at James Cook University, University of Aarhus, and the Australian National University, and has been the ANU’s H. C. Coombs Fellow, and thereafter a Visiting Scholar in its Department of Archaeology and Natural History. He has also been the Museum of Victoria’s Thomas Ramsay Science and Humanities Fellow; and served for a decade as National Vice-President of Sustainable Population Australia. Mark has published 16 books of verse, and is the editor of Oxford University Press’Two Centuries of Australian Poetry. He is a frequent voice on a range of ABC radio programs.

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