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Why We Vote: How Schools and Communities Shape Our Civic Life
     

Why We Vote: How Schools and Communities Shape Our Civic Life

by David E. Campbell
 

ISBN-10: 069113829X

ISBN-13: 9780691138299

Pub. Date: 07/21/2008

Publisher: Princeton University Press

Why do more people vote--or get involved in other civic and political activities--in some communities than in others? Why We Vote demonstrates that our communities shape our civic and political engagement, and that schools are especially significant communities for fostering strong civic norms.

Much of the research on political participation has found that

Overview

Why do more people vote--or get involved in other civic and political activities--in some communities than in others? Why We Vote demonstrates that our communities shape our civic and political engagement, and that schools are especially significant communities for fostering strong civic norms.

Much of the research on political participation has found that levels of participation are higher in diverse communities where issues important to voters are hotly contested. In this well-argued book, David Campbell finds support for this view, but also shows that homogenous communities often have very high levels of civic participation despite a lack of political conflict.

Campbell maintains that this sense of civic duty springs not only from one's current social environment, but also from one's early influences. The degree to which people feel a sense of civic obligation stems, in part, from their adolescent experience. Being raised and thus socialized in a community with strong civic norms leads people to be civically engaged in adulthood. Campbell demonstrates how the civic norms within one's high school impact individuals' civic involvement--even a decade and a half after those individuals have graduated.

Efforts within America's high schools to enhance young people's sense of civic responsibility could have a participatory payoff in years to come, the book concludes; thus schools would do well to focus more attention on building civic norms among their students.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691138299
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
07/21/2008
Series:
Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, International, and Comparative Perspectives Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
1,300,633
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures ix
List of Tables xi
Acknowledgments xiii

Chapter One: Introduction: Voting Alone 1

Part One: What You Do Now Depends on Where You Are Now 11

Chapter Two: Putting Madison and Tocqueville to the Test: The Dual Motivations Theory of Public Engagement 13
Chapter Three: Further Implications of the Dual Motivations Theory 50
Chapter Four: Social Networks 76

Part Two: What You Did Then Depends on Where You Were Then 93

Chapter Five: Social Environments and Adolescents' Public Engagement 95

Part Three: What You Do Now Depends on What You Did Then 129

Chapter Six: The Links between Adolescents' and Adults' Public Engagement 131

Part Four: What You Do Now Depends on Where You Were Then 145

Chapter Seven: Adolescents' Social Environments and Adults' Public Engagement: The Civic Motivation Model 147
Chapter Eight: Conclusion: Implications for Theory and Policy 180

Appendix A: Data Sources 201
Appendix B: Questions from the 1996 National Election Study Used in Table 2.1 and Figure 2.4 204
Appendix C: Full Results of Models Discussed in the Text 208

Notes 223
Bibliography 243
Index 261

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