Wicked Cool Shell Scripts: 101 Scripts for Linux, Mac OS X, and UNIX Systems

Overview

Fun and functional Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX shell scripts

The UNIX shell is the main scripting environment of every Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX system, whether a rescued laptop or a million-dollar mainframe. This cookbook of useful, customizable, and fun scripts gives you the tools to solve common Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX problems and personalize your computing environment. Among the more than 100 scripts included are an interactive calculator, a spell checker, a disk backup ...

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Overview

Fun and functional Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX shell scripts

The UNIX shell is the main scripting environment of every Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX system, whether a rescued laptop or a million-dollar mainframe. This cookbook of useful, customizable, and fun scripts gives you the tools to solve common Linux, Mac OS X and UNIX problems and personalize your computing environment. Among the more than 100 scripts included are an interactive calculator, a spell checker, a disk backup utility, a weather tracker, and a web logfile analysis tool. The book also teaches you how to write your own sophisticated shell scripts by explaining the syntax and techniques used to build each example scripts. Examples are written in Bourne Shell (sh) syntax.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
You can make UNIX friendlier, more personal, and even more powerful. It just takes a little shell scripting skill, and a little inspiration. This book delivers both.

You’ll find 101 fascinating, non-trivial scripts here (most Bourne, with a little bash). There are scripts for sysadmins (including a disk quota system that automatically emails violators). There are loads of UNIX tweaks, including “unremove,” and a more useful ls. There are dozens of web scripts -- including tools for extracting a page’s URLs, or emailing you when a page changes content, or helping you analyze traffic logs. And for Macfolk, a full chapter of OS X scripts (even one for iTunes). Wicked cool, indeed. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2003 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

From The Critics
Slashdot.org
This incredibly fun book (really!), written by Dave Taylor, a veteran UNIX, Solaris and Mac OS X author, is chock full of 101 scripts to customize the UNIX (Bourne) shell. ... Sysadmins and webmasters will find this book fundamentally critical to day-to-day operations; there are dozens of invaluable, customizable scripts highlighted in this book to enable professionals to save time and add simple, elegant solutions to annoying issues in their work environment. User account management, rotating log files, cron scripts, web page tweaks, apache passwords, synchronizing via ftp, etc. are all eminently useful and tweakable.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593270124
  • Publisher: No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
  • Publication date: 1/28/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 936,348
  • Product dimensions: 6.98 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Dave Taylor has a Masters degree in Education, an MBA, and has written a dozen technical books, including Learning UNIX for Mac OS X (O'Reilly), Solaris for Dummies (Hungry Minds), and Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours (SAMS). He was a contributor to BSD 4.4 UNIX, and his software is included in many major UNIX distributions.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
Ch. 1 The Missing Code Library 9
Ch. 2 Improving on User Commands 43
Ch. 3 Creating Utilities 71
Ch. 4 Tweaking Unix 93
Ch. 5 System Administration: Managing Users 111
Ch. 6 System Administration: System Maintenance 137
Ch. 7 Web and Internet Users 165
Ch. 8 Webmaster Hacks 201
Ch. 9 Web and Internet Administration 229
Ch. 10 Internet Server Administration 255
Ch. 11 Mac OS X Scripts 297
Ch. 12 Shell Script Fun and Games 315
Afterword 329
Index 331
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2004

    Try Scripting Web Apps

    The book is aimed at all users and systems administrators of linux and every unix variant, including most importantly the MacOS. If you already know some scripting, you should be quite at ease here. Taylor does decide to restrict his discussion to the Bourne shell and its descendent, bash. He drops the C shell! But, as he points out, the scripts he gives can be easily rewritten in the latter if you desire. The book can be roughly divided into two parts. The first is essentially traditional scripting tasks. A user from 1988 would see original material here, but no qualitative surprises. The second half of the book is more interesting. It centres on Web applications. For example, when running a Web server that uses CGI, Perl and C are often the choice for implementing logic. But sometimes you can get by with a simpler approach - using a Bourne shell. Taylor shows how to do this to make simple web pages, with images, even. Cool! Though this outlook lacks the full expressive power of generating dynamic pages via Java Server Pages/Servlets, these latter alternatives can be quite forbidding to learn. If you are already comfortable with sed, awk, grep [etc], you may want to try this approach, provided your web site is not too complex. In summary, the web scripting approach suggested here may be the most distinctive and useful sections. Worth checking out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2010

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