Wickedly Charming [NOOK Book]

Overview

Cinderella's Prince Charming is divorced and at a dead-end in his career, so he opens a bookstore and travels the land ordering books and discovering new authors. Still handsome and still charming, he has given up on women, royalty, and anything that smacks of a future.


Mellie is sick and tired of being called the Evil Stepmother. She did her best by her stepdaughter Snow White, but the girl resented her to no end and made all kinds of false ...

See more details below
Wickedly Charming

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price

Overview

Cinderella's Prince Charming is divorced and at a dead-end in his career, so he opens a bookstore and travels the land ordering books and discovering new authors. Still handsome and still charming, he has given up on women, royalty, and anything that smacks of a future.


Mellie is sick and tired of being called the Evil Stepmother. She did her best by her stepdaughter Snow White, but the girl resented her to no end and made all kinds of false accusations.


Neither of them believes in happily ever after anymore, but both of them believe in happily for the moment . . .


Praise for Kristine Grayson:


"Kristine Grayson gives 'happily ever after' her own unique twist!"

-Kasey Michaels, USA Today bestselling author of How to Tame a Lady

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Reality and fairy tales collide in this altogether delightful story. Prince Charming, now divorced from Cinderella, has happily shed his storybook image for a life of running a bookstore and raising his two daughters. Mellie, on the other hand, can't get over being forever labeled as Evil. When she meets Charming at a book fair while protesting with People for the Ethical Treatment of Archetypes, the attraction is immediate and mutual, but first they must overcome Mellie's hatred of books and Charming's daughters' wariness ("Dad, she's the evil stepmother"). While a bit confusing at first, the story eventually flows and becomes a quick read, with engaging side characters and a sweet romance. Book lovers will be thrilled by the inside look at the publishing world, while fairy tale fans will love the in-jokes. (May)
Alternative Worlds
An amusing satirical take on images, public spins, and the publishing industry.
Book Girl of Mur-y-Castell
A great spin to stories we all know...
Booklist
Grayson deftly nods to pop culture and offers clever spins on classic legends and lore while adding unique twists all her own.
Historical Novel Review Blog
A fun and delightful story, read Wickedly Charming and find out what really happens to "happily ever after!"
Night Owl Reviews
I love this take on an old story... Exceedingly endearing... Reviewer Top Pick!
Pencil Pushers and Ink Splotches
The author manages to bring you along two very different paths that somehow merger perfectly into one very emotional and believable plot.
RT Book Reviews
A delightful antidote to the fairy tale and an entertaining read. 4 Stars
Library Journal
Divorced and disillusioned by love, Prince Charming (Cinderella's, in this case) pursues his passion for books and opens a bookstore in the Greater World. However, when he meets Snow White's gorgeous stepmother, Melvina, at a book fair where she is protesting the way stepmothers and others are portrayed in fairy tales, both their lives take a surprising turn. He sets out to show Mellie the "Charming way" to get her point across in this fanciful tale with a serious core. VERDICT Unusual, whimsical, and wickedly clever, this funny romp takes a decidedly offbeat look at fairy tales from the characters' points of view, with delightful, magical results. Grayson (Totally Spellbound) lives in Oregon.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402248498
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 84,223
  • File size: 959 KB

Meet the Author

Before turning to romance writing, award-winning author Kristine Grayson edited the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction and ran Pulphouse Publishing (which won her a World Fantasy Award). She has won the Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice Award and, under her real name, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, the prestigious Hugo award. She lives with her own Prince Charming, writer Dean Wesley Smith, in Portland, Oregon.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1
Book Fair

The very words of the sign filled Mellie with loathing. Book Fair indeed. More like Book Unfair.
Every time people wrote something down, they got it wrong. She'd learned that in her exceptionally long life.

Not that she was old-not by any stretch. In fact, by the standards of her people, she was in early middle age. She'd been in early middle age, it seemed, for most of her adult life. Of course that wasn't true. She'd only been in early middle age for her life in the public eye-two very different things.
And now she was paying for it.

She stood in a huge but nearly empty parking lot in the bright morning sun. It was going to be hot-California, too-dry-to-tolerate hot, fifty-bottles-of-Gatorade hot-but it wasn't hot yet. Still, she hoped she had on enough sunscreen (even if it did make her smell like a weird, chemical coconut). She had her hands on her hips (which hadn't expanded [much] since she was a beautiful young girl, who caught the eye of every man) as she surveyed the stunningly large building in front of her, with the banner strung across its multitude of doors.

The Largest Book Fair in the World!, the banner proclaimed in bright red letters. The largest book fair with the largest number of publishers, writers, readers and moguls-movie and gaming and every other type of mogul the entertainment industry had come up with.

It probably should be called Mogul Fair (Mogul Unfair?). But people were pitching books, not pitch­ing moguls (although someone probably should pitch moguls; it was her experience that anyone with a shred of power should be pitched across a room [or down a staircase] every now and then).

This season's books, next season's books, books for every race, creed, and constituency, large books, small books, and the all-important evergreen books which were not, as she once believed, books about evergreens, but books that never went out of style, like Little Women or anything by Jane Austen or, dammit, by that villain Hans Christian Andersen.

Not that Andersen started it all. He didn't. It was those Grimm brothers, two better named individuals she had never met.

It didn't matter that Mellie had set them straight. By then, their "tales" were already on the market, poison­ing the well, so to speak. (Or the apple. Those boys did love their poisons. It would have been so much bet­ter for all concerned if they had turned their attention to crime fiction. They could have invented the entire category. But noooo. They had to focus on what they called "fairies," as misnamed as their little "tales.")

She made herself breathe. Even alone with her own thoughts, she couldn't help going on a bit of a rant about those creepy little men.

She made herself turn away from the gigantic build­ing and walk to the back of her minivan. With the push of a button, the hatchback unlocked (now that was magic) and she pulled the thing open.
Fifty signs and placards leaned haphazardly against each other. Last time, she'd only needed twenty. She hoped she would use all fifty this time.

She glanced at her watch. One hour until the Book Unfair opened.

Half an hour until her group showed up.

Mellie glared at the building again. Sometimes she thought of these things like a maze she needed to thread her way through. But this was a fortress, one she needed to conquer. All those entrances intimidated her. It was impossible to tell where she'd get the most media exposure. Certainly not at the front doors, with the handicapped ramp blocking access along one side.

Once someone else arrived to help her hand out the plac­ards, she could leave for a few minutes and reconnoiter.

She wanted the maximum amount of air time for the minimum amount of exposure. She'd learned long ago that if she gave the media too much time in the begin­ning, they'd distort everything she said.
Better to parcel out information bit by bit.

The Book Unfair was only her first salvo.

But she knew it would be the most important.

- -

He parked his silver Mercedes at the far end of the mas­sive parking lot. He did it not so that he wouldn't be recognized-he wouldn't be, anyway-but because he'd learned long ago that if he parked his Mercedes anywhere near the front, the car would either end up with door dings and key scratches, or would go missing.

He reached into the glove box and removed his prized purple bookseller's badge. He had worked for two years to acquire that thing. Not that he minded. It still amazed him that no one at the palace had thought of opening a bookstore on the grounds.

He could still hear his father's initial objection: We are not shopkeepers! He'd said it in that tone that meant shopkeepers were lower than scullery maids. In fact, shopkeepers had become his father's favorite epithet in the past few decades, scullery maid being both politi­cally and familially incorrect.
It took some convincing-the resident scholars had to prove to his father's satisfaction that true shopkeep­ers made a living at what they did, and in no way would a bookstore on the palace grounds provide anyone's living-but the bookstore finally happened.

With it came a myriad of book catalogues and dis­counts and advance reading copies and a little bit of bookish swag.

He'd been in heaven. Particularly when he realized he could attend every single book fair in the Greater World and get free books.

Not that he couldn't pay for his own books-he could, as well as books for each person in the entire Third Kingdom (which he did last year, to much com­plaint: it seemed everyone thought they would be tested on the contents of said gift books. Not everyone loved reading as much as he did, more's the pity).

Books had been his retreat since boyhood. He loved hiding in imaginary worlds. Back then, books were harder to come by, often hidden in monasteries (and going to those had caused some consternation for his parents until they realized he was reading, not practic­ing for his future profession). Once the printing press caught on, he bought his own books-he now devoted the entire winter palace to his collection-but it still wasn't enough.

If he could, he would read every single book ever written-or at least scan them, trying to get a sense of them. Even with the unusually long life granted to peo­ple of the Third Kingdom, especially when compared with people in the Greater World (the world that had provided his Mercedes and this quite exciting book fair), he would never achieve it. There were simply too many existing books in too many languages, with too many more being written all the time.

He felt overwhelmed when he thought of all the books he hadn't read, all the books he wanted to read, and all the books he would want to read. Not to mention all the books that he hadn't heard of.

Those dismayed him the most.

Hence, the book fair.

He was told to come early. There was a breakfast for booksellers-coffee and doughnuts, the website said, free of charge. He loved this idea of free as an enticement. He wondered if he could use it for anything back home.

The morning was clear, with the promise of great heat. A smog bank had started to form over Los Angeles, and he couldn't see the ocean, although the brochures assured him it was somewhere nearby. The parking lot looked like a city all by itself. It went on for blocks, delineated only by signs that labeled the rows with double letters.

The only other car in this part of the lot wasn't a car at all but one of those minivans built so that families could take their possessions and their entertainment systems with them.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 104 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(41)

4 Star

(24)

3 Star

(24)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(7)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 104 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is an amusing satirical take on images, public spins, and the publishing industry

    Prince Charming and Cinderella are divorced with the former owning and running a bookstore under the name of Dave Encanto. As a single dad he raises their two offspring far from the fairy tale happily ever after life of a royal in the Third Kingdom as the people blamed him for the split with Ella.

    Also in exile from the Third Kingdom is Mellie who is upset with being stereotyped as evil because she happens to be a stepmother whose life was ruined by rumors of her abusing her stepdaughter Snow White. Angry with the injustice caused by those mean spirited Grimm brothers for her and her cohorts, she goes to a book fair to protest the lying portrayal of her and other stepmothers as malicious malevolent; she wants her Stephanie Meyer's Twilight moment as the vampires have recently been redeemed. Mellie and Charming (along with his distrusting daughters) meet; he offers to help her write the true story of her and Snow White. Neither expected an attraction to spring up between them.

    This is an amusing satirical take on images, public spins, and the publishing industry as Kristine Grayson provides a charming "fractured fairy tale" that the late Jay Ward would have enjoyed. Filled with jocularity, a clever romance, and an Imp of a child (and her sister) fearing the evil stepmother, fans will enjoy what happens following the happily ever after classic fairy tales; in this addition it does not guarantee a happy ending.

    Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 29, 2012

    Great spin on the wicked stepmother tale

    This is a story about what really happened to Snow White's Wicked Stepmother and how life has treated her. There is a lot of humor in this book. I'll definitely be looking for other books from this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2012

    Prince Charming with issuees

    Wwho would've thought Prince Charming had insecurity issues.
    Thought this was cute.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    Recommend

    “Wickedly Charming” is a fun and different love story. It took me a couple of chapters but then I was caught and enjoyed it immensely

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    Fab!

    Love it!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 4, 2012

    When I first read the summary, I assumed that it was speaking hy

    When I first read the summary, I assumed that it was speaking hypothetically. That there was a poor guy in the real world whose story was a lot like Cinderella and Prince Charming, but it didn't work out, and Mellie is just an average stepmom struggling with stereotypes.
    That's not what I got.
    When I realized that Charming was literally written to be THE Prince Charming who was divorced Ella and come to our world, LA to be exact, I was shocked. And then I learned that Mellie, aka Melvina wasn't just any stepmom. She was SNOW WHITE'S stepmom. Except Snow's story isn't exactly accurate...

    Once I realized that, I really got into the novel. A third of the way in, I got really irritated because the summary is a little flawed. Charming starts his bookstore after meeting Mellie, probably not until abouthalfway into the book, at least. And Mellie isn't trying to correct society's view on step moms because she knows it worked for vampires. She doesn't learn about the whole vampires story until after Charming tells her.
    So, all in all, the summary is chronologically incorrect and didn't do a good job of representing the story. My personal opinion? They threw the vampire thing in there to grab attention, which they did, but it could have been placed better just so nitpicky readers like me don't get their panties in a bunch.

    But aside from the back, this book was a REALLY great read. It was like reading a story, within a story, within a story. You've got fairy tale characters in the United States trying to change their lives, debunking of fairy tales we know and love, and all through a book. This book basically does exactly what happens in the book's story and it manages to give us good examples too. Like vampires becoming romantic and sexy and the Wicked Witch of the West becoming a sympathetic character. It shows us just how much of an effect books can have on people's opinions, not just once, but twice.
    PLUS, it's a romance novel. Can't get much better than that. ;)

    Like I said, this was a really good book. If you're open to "women's fiction" at all, I encourage you to read it. I unexpectedly enjoyed this book, and now I can't wait to go find more in the series ;)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Excellent

    Superb story. Read it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    The title does't lie...

    It is wickedly charming. The characters take on a life of their own as they step out of the fairy tale trappings and reveal their flaws. I can't wait to read the next in the series.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    Too charming

    I like the way it had a twist on fairy tales. at first I had trouble getting into it, then I found myself skipping pages but I stayed with it just to get to the end. When I got to the part of "the Book" this is where I really enjoyed the story only wish it when a little longer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2011

    Highly recommend

    Very good, a different twist on fairy tales. I could not put it down. I hope to read more from this author.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2011

    Recommend

    A "charming" story. First few chapters are slow but once you get into the story it is a fun read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2011

    Fun twist on old fairy tales

    Kept my interest throughout.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 14, 2011

    A fun read.

    Quick paced and a nice twist on fairy tales. Story line with wide open possiblities for a series.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2011

    New take on an old fairy tale!

    Terrific book,well written and funny

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 17, 2011

    A Fun Read!

    An interesting twist on the fairy tales we all know. Mellie is Snow White's stepmother and is out to promote a better image for misunderstood stepmoms all over. Charming is Cinderella's ex-husband and a bit of a nerd who loves books. Together they come up with a plan: a book from the stepmother's point of view.

    Grayson nicely pokes at the story stereotypes we all know, thanks to the Brothers Grimm and Disney. I stayed up way past my bedtime getting to the end of this one. Worth a look.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Charming indeed!

    I loved this book! I've read Grayson before, but not for several years--just happened to see it in passing at the story yesterday, so I picked it up. A clever story about what happens after the fairy tale ending is over, this one just confirmed for me why I've never quite warmed up to Cinderella throughout the years. (I never suspected she was as bad as all this, mind you; I just resented that she always got to wear the blue dress when everyone knew that Princess Aurora's dress looked much better in blue than in pink.) I've long felt it would be nice if the family dynamics in Disney stories were a bit healthier, so I really enjoyed this story about an "evil" stepmother attempting to get her reputation salvaged. It certainly didn't hurt that she did it with a book, or that Prince Charming is not only a wonderful father but a serious lover of books himself. I can't wait until Utterly Charming comes out in the fall!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 104 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)