Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.37
(Save 70%)
Est. Return Date: 10/20/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$16.97
(Save 39%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 92%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (102) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $4.99   
  • Used (97) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(100)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and never been read. Pages are crisp with no markings on the cover.

Ships from: Bellerose Village, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$5.00
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(347)

Condition: New
New Hardback Book With Inventory Mark - No Tears - No Creases - Thank You

Ships from: South Lebanon, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$9.33
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(748)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 1591841933 SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS WITH BEST PRICES. FROM A COMPANY YOU TRUST, HUGE SELECTION. RELIABLE CUSTOMER SERVICE! ! HASSLE FREE RETURN POLICY, SATISFACTION ... GURANTEED**** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$10.55
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(88)

Condition: New
2008-04-17 Hardcover New HARDCOVER, BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 4 of 5
Close
Sort by

Overview

An updated edition of the national bestseller-now with a new introduction and a new chapter

Today, encyclopedias, jetliners, operating systems, mutual funds, and many other items are being created by teams numbering in the thousands or even millions. While some leaders fear the heaving growth of these massive online communities, Wikinomics proves this fear is folly. Smart firms can harness collective capability and genius to spur innovation, growth, and success.

A brilliant guide to one of the most profound changes of our time, Wikinomics challenges our most deeply-rooted assumptions about business and will prove indispensable to anyone who wants to understand competitiveness in the twenty- first century.

Based on a $9 million research project led by bestselling author Don Tapscott, Wikinomics shows how masses of people can participate in the economy like never before. They are creating TV news stories, sequencing the human genome, remixing their favorite music, designing software, finding a cure for disease, editing school texts, inventing new cosmetics, or even building motorcycles. You'll read about:
• Rob McEwen, the Goldcorp, Inc. CEO who used open source tactics and an online competition to save his company and breathe new life into an old-fashioned industry.
• Flickr, Second Life, YouTube, and other thriving online communities that transcend social networking to pioneer a new form of collaborative production.
• Mature companies like Procter & Gamble that cultivate nimble, trust-based relationships with external collaborators to form vibrant business ecosystems.

An important look into the future, Wikinomics will be your road map for doing business in the twenty-first century.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Sklar is a sophisticated reader whose well-known voice is a smooth platform for the authors' case studies of innovative information sharing…. Sklar provides an engaging reading that will make listeners excited." —-AudioFile
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591841937
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/17/2008
  • Edition description: Expanded edition
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 6.26 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Don Tapscott and David Ticoll co-founded the business research and consulting firm Digital 4Sight in 1994. They have written for publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Harvard Business Review, The Globe and Mail and Forbes and appeared on national broadcast media around the world. Both live in Toronto.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Subtitles 5

1 Wikinomics 7

2 The Perfect Storm 34

3 The Peer Pioneers 65

4 Ideagoras 97

5 The Prosumers 124

6 The New Alexandrians 151

7 Platforms for Participation 183

8 The Global Plant Floor 213

9 The Wiki Workplace 239

10 Collaborative Minds 268

11 Enterprise 2.0 288

Acknowledgments 317

Notes 321

Index 341

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 6, 2009

    Important Topic Poorly Executed

    Tapscott and Williams have written a book on the economics of the web that reads as if it was written at a fraternity kegger. The book is verbose, repetitive, and though overly long, barely gives the reader any real insight into the topic.

    The two fraternity brothers make many pontifical statements about intellectual property as if making the statement proves the case. They skirt the very important issue of what makes some companies willing to give up rights to intellectual property while other companies retain rights to intellectual property. I suspect the real answer to why companies give up rights to intellectual property is because doing so enhances their bottom line or creates advantages for them in the marketplace. They seem to soft-peddle the fact that the person/company which owns the intellectual property is the person/company which can chose to give away that intellectual property--that anyone else taking or making use of that intellectual property is a thief!

    I did notice that the two fratboys did not give away their intellectual property having copyrighted both the first and second editions of Wikinomics.

    For those people who want to (or have to because your pointy-haired boss insists you) read this book, I would look for the cheapest copy I can find, would borrow it from a friend (or is that stealing, Don and Tony?), or check it out of the library. I would recommend the reader save time reading by skipping any section in which the fratboys are pontificating and any section in which you find yourself reading a rehash of a previous section. That strategy will turn this 340 page tome into a barely readable 120 pages of poorly written material. It's a shame you cannot scale down the price by the same percentage.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Great Idea, Poor execution

    The idea of this book is excellent. The concepts it focuses on: Peer-production methods, open-source software, and collaboration are clearly ideas and themes that the business world must embrace. The problem with this book is execution. Its poorly written, repetitive and short on in-depth analysis. All those things make getting through it a slog. The authors point out early on that the book was written as an outgrowth of a major study they do for some big corporations on the subject. One is left with the sense that the big corporations got the better result of their work and this "cliff notes" version is simply not worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2008

    Good Topic, Poorly Delivered

    The authors of this book have a very important topic to discuss and there is some value to be gained by reading this book. The problem is that the authors writing style is lacking and it makes reading the book a bit of a trial. As with many authors writing about Web 2.0 concepts and innovation Tapscott and Williams are overly optimistic about the results from using the concepts they espouse. To be sure, there are some companies that have tried these measures and have met with little success ... any business book worth its salt needs to provide a complete picture to get an honest appraisal of new methods. Discussing the disadvantages of these methods 'how they impact overall employment in this country especially for lower wage jobs and the significant impact on our copyright laws' would have been welcome. Maybe that was in there, but I found myself skimming some sections because the authors have a habit of repeating themselves over and over again ... making the same points ad-nauesum. You get the sense that there is some serious meat missing from this meal and the authors admit that in the preface ... this book was an outgrowth of a major study they did on behalf of a consortium of big companies. Unfortunately, they weren't allowed to include what was in that report and it shows.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2007

    A reviewer

    Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams have created a new guide to the modern way of economics, known as Wikinomics. Through Wikinomics we are seeing forms of mass collaboration on a global scale that are continually changing and re-shaping the Economy. I thought this book did a very in-depth look at many examples of Wikinomics and how it is in use in today¿s businesses from gold mining and chemistry, to the web and beyond. This book also inflates some ideas of Wikinomics to an extreme and may not take in all of the critiques that they should, yet they do prove many good points about mass collaboration and how it is used today. I believe after reading this book that Wikinomics will change many business principals, and the way we do business all together. From Wikies to Heavy Industry we see Wikinomics in use to a global extent, with the art of mass collaboration I believe that Wikinomics will be adopted as a major business rule.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2007

    Wiki-Review

    Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams have created a very in depth review of open source and mass collaboration explaining how it is effecting the modern economy, relating it to file sharing, gold mining, or the war between operating systems such as Windows versus Linux. In this ever changing world ideas such as openly sharing your company's secrets may benefit you. Or maybe it is best to bond with other companies and form many allies, all of which is examined and explained in this book. Although there are several points within the book where the authors are a bit biased they are able validate their points and still explain both sides of the argument. It is my belief that reading this book will benefit anyone that has a slight interest in economics or the business world so that they may understand the risks that may take and how it will potentially affect them in the long run.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2007

    A reviewer

    I found that Wikinomics was a well-written, informative book about the coming of age of the internet. Its basic point is that the internet is becoming absolutely free, with books, social networking, encyclopedias and others operate for free with help from unpaid individuals. For instance, Wikinomics mentions that BMW opened all of the code for its computers in its car and freelance computer coders fixed, updated and improved the code for the cars. It implies that businesses should work like internet forums, allowing input from non-employees to make better innovations and products, at the risk of displaying your business model to competitors. It's a balance, however, to decide whether to hold your inner-business secret and recieve no outside help, or to display everything and hopefully recieve outside input.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    A reviewer

    The first few chapters were the best for me. Once the author's got into descriptions of what large corporations did/didn't do regarding the impact of Web 2.0 on their industry/business I lost interest. There are nuggets of significant value in the book, but I got bored trying to find them. The last chapter offers the reader an opportunity to join their 'wiki' on wikinomics which I might take them up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2007

    a reviewer

    Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams have written an intriguing, necessary and, in some ways, groundbreaking book, which we recommend to everyone...with some caveats. The authors examine the possibilities of mass collaboration, open-source software and evolutionary business practices. They integrate examples from the arts ('mashups'), scholarship (Wikipedia) and even heavy industry (gold mining) to argue that new forces are reshaping human societies. Some of their examples will be familiar, but others will surprise and educate you. However, the authors are so deeply part of the world they discuss that they may inflate it at times - for instance, making the actions of a few enthusiasts sound as if they already have transformed the Internet - and they sometimes fail to provide definitions or supporting data. Is the 'blogosphere,' for example, really making members of the younger generation into more critical thinkers? Tapscott and Williams repeatedly dismiss criticisms of their claims or positions without answering them. The result is that the book reads at times like a guidebook, at times like a manifesto and at times like a cheerleading effort for the world the authors desire. It reads, in short, like the Wikipedia they so admire: a valuable, exciting experiment that still contains a few flaws.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 17 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)