The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today

The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today

4.2 9
by Rob Dunn
     
 

ISBN-10: 006180648X

ISBN-13: 9780061806483

Pub. Date: 06/21/2011

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

In the name of progress and clean living, we scrub much of nature off our bodies and try to remove whole kinds of life—parasites, bacteria, mutualists, and predators. To modern humans, nature is the landscape outside. Biologist Rob Dunn contends that while "clean living" has benefited us in some ways, it has also made us sicker in others.

We are

…  See more details below

Overview

In the name of progress and clean living, we scrub much of nature off our bodies and try to remove whole kinds of life—parasites, bacteria, mutualists, and predators. To modern humans, nature is the landscape outside. Biologist Rob Dunn contends that while "clean living" has benefited us in some ways, it has also made us sicker in others.

We are trapped in bodies that evolved to deal with the dependable presence of hundreds of other species. This disconnect from the web of life has resulted in unprecedented effects that immunologists, evolutionary biologists, psychologists, and other scientists are only beginning to understand. Diabetes, autism, allergies, many anxiety disorders, autoimmune diseases, and even tooth, jaw, and vision problems are increasingly plaguing bodies that have been removed from the ecological context in which they existed for millennia.

Dunn considers this crossroads at which we find ourselves. Through the stories of visionaries, Dunn argues that we can create a richer nature, one in which we choose to surround ourselves with species that benefit us, not just those that, despite us, survive.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061806483
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/21/2011
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
397,670
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction ix

Part I Who We All Used to Be

1 The Origins of Humans and the Control of Nature 3

Part II Why We Sometimes Need Worms and Whether or Not You Should Rewild Your Gut

2 When Good Bodies Go Bad (and Why) 17

3 The Pronghorn Principle and What Our Guts Flee 30

4 The Dirty Realities of What to Do When You Are Sick and Missing Your Worms 45

Part III What Your Appendix Does and How It Has Changed

5 Several Things the Gut Knows and the Brain Ignores 61

6 I Need My Appendix (and So Do My Bacteria) 91

Part IV How We Tried to Tame Cows (and Crops) but Instead They Tamed Us, and Why It Made Some of Us Fat

7 When Cows and Grass Domesticated Humans 111

8 So Who Cares If Your Ancestors Sucked Milk from Aurochsen? 130

Part V How Predators Left Us Scared, Pathos-ridden, and Covered in Goose Bumps

9 We Were Hunted, Which Is Why All of Us Are Afraid Some of the Time and Some of Us Are Afraid All of the Time 143

10 From Flight to Fight 155

11 Vermeij's Law of Evolutionary Consequences and How Snakes Made the World 164

12 Choosing Who Lives 181

Part VI The Pathogens That Left Us Hairless and Xenophobic

13 How Lice and Ticks (and Their Pathogens) Made Us Naked and Gave Us Skin Cancer 203

14 How the Pathogens That Made Us Naked Also Made Us Xenophobic, Collectivist, and Disgusted 217

Part VII The Future of Human Nature

15 The Reluctant Revolutionary of Hope 233

Acknowledgments 261

Notes 263

Index 279

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites, and Partners That Shape Who We Are Today 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I won't hurt her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wails mommy mommy mommy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AnnieBM More than 1 year ago
Rob Dunn, a professor and researcher at North Carolina State University, does an excellent job of presenting many interesting aspects of the wildness of our bodies. The foundation of our wildness is its ecology -- that our bodies are essentailly in relationships with other organisms which shape not only our state of health but how that health is maintained. This ecological perspective is the most important aspect overlooked by medical practise and research. Very thought provoking, accessible, and gives a much needed broad perspective concerning the most intimate relationships between our bodies and other organisms. Read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dam<_>n missed er
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kalee??