Wild Shore (Three Californias #2)

( 4 )

Overview

2047: For the small Pacific Coast community of San Onofre, life in the aftermath of a devastating nuclear attack is a matter of survival, a day-to-day struggle to stay alive. But young Hank Fletcher dreams of the world that might have been, and might yet be—and dreams of playing a crucial role in America's rebirth.

The author of the award-winning Red Mars and its sequel Green Mars offers a vision of a radically different alternative future in the first volume of his...

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The Wild Shore: Three Californias

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Overview

2047: For the small Pacific Coast community of San Onofre, life in the aftermath of a devastating nuclear attack is a matter of survival, a day-to-day struggle to stay alive. But young Hank Fletcher dreams of the world that might have been, and might yet be—and dreams of playing a crucial role in America's rebirth.

The author of the award-winning Red Mars and its sequel Green Mars offers a vision of a radically different alternative future in the first volume of his highly acclaimed "Three Californias" trilogy. The Wild Shore tells the story of a young man coming of age on the Pacific coast in the aftermath of a devastating nuclear war.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"There's a fresh wind blowing in The Wild Shore." —Ursula K. Le Guin

"Part Huck Finn and part Our Town....A well-written, engaging rite of passage." —Publishers Weekly

"Beautifully written...with a vivid depth rarely encountered in science fiction." —The Washington Post

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312890360
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 3/15/1995
  • Series: Wild Shore Triptych Series , #2
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 497,441
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Meet the Author

Kim Stanley Robinson's Three Californias trilogy — The Gold Coast, The Wild Shore and Pacific Edge — has been observed as "an intriguing work, one that will delight and entertain you, and, most importantly, cause you to stop and think" (The Santa Ana Register). His many other novels include Escape from Kathmandu and Green Mars — which won the Hugo and Locus Award for Best Novel.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 11, 2014

    This book is set in a quarantined America devastated by nuclear

    This book is set in a quarantined America devastated by nuclear weapons. While we are subjected to much speculation by various characters, we never do find out precisely who attacked America, why they were attacked or why they are under quarantine.

    Kim Stanley Robertson has a real talent for presenting believable characters and situations in his books, and this one is no exception. I felt sympathy for the people in this book, who were simply trying to rebuild their lives under very trying circumstances, not knowing who to trust, who to regard as the enemy or why they were being held back from recovery.

    I found this book to be so realistic, particularly in the light of the fact that it was written in the mid-eighties, during the height of the cold war, that it was, at times, quite frightening. This is not the best post-apocalyptic novel I have read, but it is definitely worth your time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2008

    Thoroughly unrealistic post-nuclear war California.

    This novel was very disappointing, so I definitely won't be reading the other two books of the series. The only reason I liked it at all was the same reason I read it: it's the only novel I know that is largely set in San Onofre, which is an area that interests me since it's one of the few pristine places left on the Southern California coast. There are some nice descriptions of the plant life of the area, especially Torrey Pines and eucalyptus, but otherwise everything is so unrealistic. The story's premise is that the United States suffered from a coordinated nuclear attack, and has been bombed back to the stone age: shades of post-9/11 sentiment in reverse, but this was written in the '80s. For some reason the author saw it necessary to change the climate as a result of this attack, which is probably not even scientifically possible. Apparently she liked the San Onofre setting as much as I do, but then why did she make it snow there, and cover it with forests so that it becomes unrecognizable in just 30 years? That much forest growth is not realistic, either. I had trouble believing any of the story: the male teen hero does not seem to have any memories of his childhood, his boldness in spying and ambushing an attack on a landing party is too out-of-character with his lifestyle and experience, his long ocean swim and walking in the snow after his escape from the Japanese were too extreme, the difficulties at rivers that the San Diegans were willing to suffer with their railroad were unrealistic, the male teen's ruminations on trees was uncharacteristically feminine, the story of the purring tiger was far-fetched, and so on. To make it worse, the story wasn't even interesting, for the most part. There was one cute detail that most people might miss, however: the place the book calls Concrete Bay is where the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station currently exists, which suggests that facility either suffered a meltdown or was ground zero for a nuke, which is what Californians have been fearing for decades. The book did stay on my mind for a while, but unless a reader has a particular interest in this geographical area or an interest in post-apocalyptic societies, I wouldn't recommend that anybody waste their time reading it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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