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Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring with the World's Last True Explorers
     

Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring with the World's Last True Explorers

3.9 27
by Richard Preston
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780141031903
Publisher:
Viking Penguin
Publication date:
08/28/2008

Meet the Author

Whether fiction or nonfiction, Richard Preston's bestselling books — about disastrous scientific scenarios — are always impeccably researched, informative, and deftly drawn. His 1998 novel The Cobra Event, about biological terrorism, was reportedly given to then President Clinton to read. Stephen King called his nonfiction book The Hot Zone, the terrifying true story of the Ebola virus, "One of the most horrifying things I've ever read."

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Hopewell, New Jersey
Date of Birth:
August 5, 1954
Place of Birth:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Education:
B.A., Pomona College, 1976; Ph.D. in English, Princeton University, 1983
Website:
http://richardpreston.net/

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The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Combining the splendor of nature with the magic of his mechanical pen, the Richard Preston has written a book filled with thrilling adventure and charming anecdotes. Written in mellifluous prose with exceptional clarity, parts of the book read like a meditative literary novel. And some parts read like a horror novel also, full of scary situations. This book will make you shake your head with awe, and fill your heart with a renewed respect for all living things in nature. With the publication of The Wild Trees, Richard Preston has added one more magical book of nonfiction to the impressive list of books he has written. This book, an exploration of the miniature world of the giant sequoia redwood trees of northern California, will imprint on your mind an indelible picture of the bounteous nature. These gentle behemoths, the largest and tallest living things on our planet, the ¿blue whales of land¿, are awe-inspiring indeed. But they are also fragile, says the author. The largest of these trees has a thirty feet wide trunk, and it is more than three hundred fifty feet tall. The author explores the world of these wild trees with the help of Steve Sillett and Marie Antoine, a couple, both of them botanists, and Michael Taylor, a son of a wealthy real estate developer, and a small group of botanists and amateur naturalists. This book will open your eyes to the grandeur of these trees. And it will show you the small world of insects, mosses, lichens, spotted salamanders and other small animals, ferns and plants and bushes such as huckleberry and even small trees, all living and thriving on the branches and trunks of these giant sequoia trees. Exploring the canopy of these wild trees is an arduous task indeed to climb a tree one must carry a heavy load of very long ropes and climbing gear. The author took lessons in climbing a tree at a tree-climbing school in Atlanta. While we can all rejoice that quite a few of these sequoias are allowed to live for now in Northern California and also a couple of other parts of our country, we should always remember that ninety-six percent of the ancient redwood trees have been felled by the logging industry. What are left, writes Richard Preston, are 'like a few fragments of stained glass from a rose window in a cathedral after the rest of the window has been smashed and swept away.' I wish to say a few words about the lovely cover of this book. At one time or another, all lovers of books have heard the refrain: Don¿t judge a book by its cover. Occasionally, however, there appears a book with a jacket so gorgeous and befitting that it not only mirrors honestly the book¿s content, but also imparts the book with a soothing shelf-appeal, just as a lovely landscape imparts a house curb-appeal. Read this book to experience the joy of reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite books ever! These wonderful old trees are amazing. Theres a whole world unto its self up in the canope! I love this book and have reccomended it over and over.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I couldn't put down this book. The characters are real people, their explorations are amazing, and their toughts about ecology and our planet are very relevant. Read the book before the redwoods disappear. Reads like the best mystery fiction!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just graduated college as a landscape architect. i learned about trees 'on the east coast' and began to have a passion for them. After reading this, I want to go to the North West and experience all these humungus trees myself. The book also clarified some plant physiology I 'learned' in school. The author did a great job of getting the reader into the story as well as the beauty of untouched nature.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a wonderful story about much more than trees. The author weaves a tale of discovery that ventures into nature and the human soul. The description of the trees and the makeup of the canopies is fascinating. The stories of the lives of those told by the author are very good as well. A very good read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Treeclan Camp!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just can't get past the first few chapters. Hoping it gets better, but just way too descriptive and boring for me, so far. I've been reading other books, in between, to break the monotony. Sorry!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good,,, You will want to climb after you finish reading
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pooleside More than 1 year ago
Richard Preston is one of THE best science writers and Wild Trees is another winner. It's obvious there's been elaborate research, proven as he writes about cutting-edge discoveries regarding the upper canopy. But it's not all science! He weaves compelling human stories throughout that keep you turning pages. This book encouraged me to make a trip to Northern California and see the redwoods for myself.
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