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Overview

Wildcat has been banned by the United Auto Workers union: General Motors and the United Auto Workers lock horns in this tale of a go-for-broke wildcat strike. Wildcat is set in Vietnam-era, 1970 Ohio at a General Motors stamping plant--lots of laughs and labor history, and a not-nostalgic look at what Vietnam cost us all.

In most of the recent books, articles, and analyses of General Motors, few armchair critics have bothered to write about ...
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Wildcat

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Overview

Wildcat has been banned by the United Auto Workers union: General Motors and the United Auto Workers lock horns in this tale of a go-for-broke wildcat strike. Wildcat is set in Vietnam-era, 1970 Ohio at a General Motors stamping plant--lots of laughs and labor history, and a not-nostalgic look at what Vietnam cost us all.

In most of the recent books, articles, and analyses of General Motors, few armchair critics have bothered to write about the company's attitude toward the rank-and-file workers who build its cars. Fortunately, we now have Bill Pancoast, a front-line autoworker in one of GM's key factories for many years, to thank for filling that void. For those trying to understand why the auto industry is where it is today, Wildcat will provide some of the answers.
--Dave Elsila, editor, Solidarity magazine,
1976-1998 and former editor, American
Teacher and Changing Education

Bill Pancoast's Wildcat is a funny, sad, and thoroughly convincing portrait of autoworkers--many damaged by war, broken dreams, or substance abuse--dependent on a General Motors plant in fictional Cranston, Ohio, during the Sixties and Seventies. After reading this moving story, I once again asked myself: why is the subject of work so often neglected by today's fiction writers? Fortunately, we have Pancoast to fill in some of the blanks.
--Donald Ray Pollock, author of Knockemstiff

Most novelists haven't been anywhere near an auto plant, let alone worked in one, but Bill Pancoast has. Wildcat takes us inside a spontaneous strike at an Ohio stamping plant in the Vietnam era, showing how righteous anger, insane hijinks, and bloodshed can break out when workers decide to do something--anything--about brutal and boring working conditions.
--Christopher Phelps, Associate professor,
American Studies, University of Nottingham

Just when General Motors is facing its biggest challenge, along comes Bill Pancoast’s Wildcat. This gritty story follows a team of autoworkers back in GM’s oil-spattered glory days. Whether you’re reading about security captain Big Bill or line worker Bobby Finnegan, Wildcat reveals the slimy underbelly of the car industry with a muckraker’s finesse. Pancoast’s knowledge of factory operations, his portrait of labor—and human—relations in America’s heartland, recall Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, as well as Ida Tarbell’s exposé of the Standard Oil Company.
—James Reiss, author of Riff on Six

I used to tell Bill Pancoast that he was going to get his ass kicked if he didn’t shut up. I’m glad he didn’t listen to me. Wildcat is the story of the auto industry no one ever believed when I told it.
--Ken Kreiger, retired autoworker, 41 years service
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Editorial Reviews

Wildcat - Charley Gee
The author provides an insightful yet vivid account on the state of industrial relations of the big three in the 1970s, a mindset that focused on internal social stratification rather than external competition. The consequences to the big three is well known by the millions of Americans who drive autos and trucks from foreign flagship companies such as Honda and Toyota.

Perhaps IPO investors in the soon to be "New" GM might encourage the new management team to read Pancoast's work. Oth
Wildcat - John Beck
Wildcat is an engrossing read and a fascinating portrait of a stamping plant, its workforce, its management and its local union across decades of change for all within the context of national industrial, political, social and cultural transformation. Some of the chapters/stories are comic, others tragic. The Vietnam War is one of the most important backdrops for this fictionalized account of the life that Pancoast lived as a local General Motors diemaker, union member, and union newspaper editor
Wildcat - Donald Pollock
Bill Pancoast's Wildcat is a funny, sad, and thoroughly convincing portrait of autoworkers--many damaged by war, broken dreams, or substance abuse--dependent on a General Motors plant in fictional Cranston, Ohio, during the Sixties and Seventies. After reading this moving novel-in-stories, I once again asked myself: why is the subject of work so often neglected by today's fiction writers? Fortunately, we have Pancoast to fill in some of the blanks.
--Donald Ray Pollock, author of Knockemsti
Wildcat - Ken Kreiger
I used to tell Bill Pancoast that he was going to get his ass kicked if he didn’t shut up. I’m glad he didn’t listen to me. Wildcat is the story of the auto industry no one ever believed when I told it. Fiction is fact.
--Ken Kreiger, retired autoworker, 41 years service
Amazon - Bill Bill
In this hardhitting suckerpunch of a novel, the author invites you into his world--the insane environment of a General Motors stamping plant. A wildcat strike in 1970 is the foundation of the plot--the boredom and brutality of the workplace force the workers to hit the street.

As the United Auto Workers and General Motors seek resolution of the strikes, the reader gets an insider's view of the auto industry of that era--complete with the hard drinking autoworkers and arrogant and incom
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012634849
  • Publisher: Blazing Flowers Press
  • Publication date: 8/20/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 124
  • File size: 336 KB

Meet the Author

William Trent Pancoast
1949—

“Blue collar writer” is how the Wall Street Journal referred to William Trent Pancoast in a 1986 front page article. By that time, his working-class-flavored short stories and essays had appeared in many Midwestern and international magazines and newspapers. Pancoast’s novel Crashing had been published in 1983. In 1986, his United Auto Worker’s union history was published. Pancoast would spend the next twenty years as the editor of a monthly union newspaper—the Union Forum—while continuing to publish his fiction, essays, and editorials not only in the Union Forum but also in Solidarity magazine, the 1.2 million circulation United Auto Workers International publication.
The term “blue collar writer” suits Pancoast just fine. As he said in the WSJ interview, “The reason I write about work is that that’s just about damn near all I’ve ever done.” The dust jacket of Crashing notes, “He has worked as a construction laborer, gas station attendant, railroad section hand and brakeman, factory laborer, commercial laundry foreman, and machinist. He has been an English teacher and is a journeyman die maker.” Pancoast supplements his blue collar writing credentials with a B.A. in English from the Ohio State University.
William Trent Pancoast is now retired from the auto industry after 30 years as a die maker and union newspaper editor. Born in Galion, Ohio, in 1949, Pancoast now lives in Ontario, Ohio.
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